Crossing the Line in Africa

-

Livres
502 pages
Lire un extrait
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus

Description

This book explores a collective understanding of the perception and treatment of borders in Africa. The notion of boundary is universal as boundaries are also an important part of human social organization. Through the ages, boundaries have remained the �container� by which national space is delineated and �contained�. For as long as there has been human society based on territoriality and space, there have been boundaries. With their dual character of exclusivism and inclusivism, states have proven to adopt a more structural approach to the respect of the former in consciousness of the esteem of international law governing sovereignty and territorial integrity. However, frontier peoples and their realities have often opted for the latter situation, imposing a more functionalist perception of these imaginary lines and prompting a border opinion shift to a more blurring form of representation and meaning in most African communities. This collective multidisciplinary effort of understanding how tangible and intangible borders have influenced Africa�s attitude and existence for ages is worthy in its own rights. The difference between what borders are and what they are not to a people is the mere product of their own estimations and practices, a disposition that leads the contributors to this book to study borders beyond states or nations and how borders are crossed or transferred from one point to the other for the convenience of their histories and being.

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Ajouté le 07 janvier 2019
Nombre de lectures 3
EAN13 9789956550784
Langue English
Signaler un problème
Crossing the Line in Africa Crossing the Line in Africa Reconsidering and Unlimiting the Limits of Borders within a Contemporary Value
EDITEDBYCanute Ambe Ngwa & Mark Bolak Funteh
Crossing the Line in Africa: Reconsidering and Unlimiting the Limits of Borders within a Contemporary Value Edited by Canute Ambe Ngwa & Mark Bolak Funteh L a ng a a R esea rch & P u blishing CIG Mankon, Bamenda
Publisher:LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.comwww.langaa-rpcig.net Distributed in and outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookscollective.com
ISBN-10: 9956-550-89-2
ISBN-13: 978-9956-550-89-0
©Canute Ambe Ngwa & Mark Bolak Funteh 2019 All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, mechanical or electronic, including photocopying and recording, or be stored in any information storage or retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher
About the Contributors Akara Damain, PhD, is a Teacher/Researcher at the Department of History, the Higher Teachers’ Training College of the University of Maroua, Cameroon. Anatole Fogou, PhD and Associate Professor of Philosophy at the Higher Teachers’ Training College of the University of Maroua, Cameroon. Ankiabom L. Lawyer, PhD, is a Lecturer of History at the Higher Teachers’ Training College of the University of Yaounde, Cameroon. Banese Betare Elias,PLEG, is a PhD Fellow of History at the University of Maroua, Cameroon. Canute A. Ngwa, PhD, is an Associate Professor of History and the Dean of the Faculty of Arts of the University of Bamenda, Cameroon. David Walais a PhD Fellow of History at the University of Ngaoundere, Cameroon. Eloundou Messi Paul Basile, PhD, is a Teacher/Researcher at the Department of Geography, the Higher Teachers’ Training College of the University of Maroua, Cameroon. Ernest Kum and Associate Professor, the University of Pretoria, South Africa. FrançoisWassouni, PhD, is a Teacher/Researcher at the Faculty of Arts, Letters and Social Sciences of the University of Maroua, Cameroon. Jabiru Muhammadou Amadou, PhD, is a Lecturer of History at the Higher Teachers’ Training College of the University of Yaounde, Cameroon.
Kingsly Awang Ollong, PhD, is a Lecturer of History at the Higher Teachers’ Training College of the University of Bamenda, Cameroon. Mark Bolak Funteh, PhD and Associate Professor of History at the University of Bamenda, Cameroon. Nguemba Guillaume, PhD, is a Teacher/Researcher at the Department of Philosophy, the Higher Teachers’ Training College of the University of Maroua, Cameroon. Ousmanou Adama, PhD, is a Teacher/Researcher at the Faculty of Arts, Letters and Social Sciences of the University of Maroua, Cameroon. Pahimi Patrice, PhD, is the Head of Department of History at the Higher Teachers’ Training College of the University of Maroua, Cameroon. Rodrigue de Paul Kepgang, is a Teacher/Researcher at the Department of History, the Higher Teachers’ Training College of the University of Maroua, Cameroon. Sali Hassan, Ph.D. is a Teacher/Researhcer at the Department of History, at the Higher Teachers’ Training College of the University of Ngaoundere, Cameroon. Samuel Kamougnana, PhD, is a Teacher/Researcher at the Department of History, Faculty of Arts, Letters and Social Sciences of the University of Maroua, Cameroon. Zacharie Duflot Tatuebu, is the Lecturer of History and Fine Arts at the Department of Fine Arts and Heritage Science, Higher Institute of the Sahel, the University of Maroua, Cameroon.
Table of Contents Introduction ...................................................................... ix Part 1: Peoples, Administration and Mobility ................... 1 Chapter 1: Administration cantonale et dynamique sociopolitique dans les monts Mandara camerounais et nigérians (1916-1958) ..................................................... 5 Samuel Kamougnana Chapter 2: Fiscalité et dynamique des migrations transfrontalières entre le Cameroun, le Tchad et le Nigeria sous la période coloniale et postcoloniale......................... 39 Pahimi Patrice Chapter 3: Dynamique des rapports entre société et individu chez les Gbaya-yaayuwee en Afrique: Entre continuité et rupture ............................................... 65 Banese Betare Elias Chapter 4: Femmes et mobilités d’affaires entre le Cameroun et les pays d’Afrique de l’ouest: fonctionnement et enjeux.................................................. 99 François Wassouni Chapter 5: Terrorist Transnational Imprints, Border Closing and Circulation around the Lake Basin Region: Boko Haram against Human and Merchandise on the Nigeria-Cameroon of Far North Cameroon..................................................... 129 Mark Bolak Funteh and Canute Ngwa Part 2: Conflict, Insecurity and Peace............................... 163 v
Chapter 6: The Authority of Consensual Thoughts and Rituals in Boundary Dispute Settlement in Cameroon: The Case of the Pre-colonial Cameroon Grassfields States .................. 167 Canute Ngwa and Damian Tatazo Akara Chapter 7: Grassfields States Boundary Conflicts in Northwest Cameroon: A Historical Investigation ................................................. 181 Jabiru Muhammadou Amadou Chapter 8: L’acuité des conflits frontaliers entre les chefferies Bamiléké à L’ouest Cameroun: Le asc de Bangou-Babouantou......... 207 Rodrigue de Paul Kepgang Chapter 9: Women as Symbols and Swords in Boko Haram’s Terror ....................................... 237 Ankiabom L. Lawyer Chapter 10: Insécurité transfrontalière, mouvements des populations et risques sanitaires dans le camp des réfugiés de Minawao Mokolo (Extrême-nord, Cameroun)................. 261 Eloundou Messi Paul Basile Chapter 11: From Transnational to National Security, the Changing Pattern of Ethno-Military Systems in the Post-independence Chad: Comparative Study from Tombalbaye to Deby ................ 277 Ousmanou Adama Part Three: State Creation, Building and Sustenance ...... 301 Chapter 12: État postcolonial et problématique identitaire : la nation politique ................. 305 Nguemba Guillaume Chapter 13: Problème de l’imprécision des frontières chez les paysTupuridu Cameroun ........... 327 David Wala
vi
Chapter 14: Security Crises in Cameroon Coastal Towns: Bakassi Freedom Fighters’ Reaction to International Decision over the Bakassi Peninsula ................................ 349 Mark Bolak Funteh Chapter 15: Strong Power Exert Follow-Up as a Fundamental Ethnic and “Agitational” Blend for Nation Building and Up-Keeping in Cameroon .......................................... 373 Ernest Kum Chapter 16: Musée et école au Cameroun: Stratégie pour briser les frontières dans leur mission éducative .............................................. 397 Zacharie Duflot Tatuebu Chapter 17: Emerging Market Multinational Corporations across Borders: Analyses of their Implication in Africa’s Development ........................................................ 423 Kingsly Awang Ollong Chapter 18: Esquisse d’une théorie normative du fédéralisme en Afrique................................ 455 Anatole Fogou
vii
viii
Introduction Geographically, the notion of boundary is universal (Foucher, 1988); boundary is also an important part of human social organisation (Alexander, 1963; Anene, 1970; Anderson, 1996). Through the ages, boundaries have remained the “container” by which national space is delineated and “contained” (Anderson and O’Dowd, 1999). For as long as there has been human society based on territoriality and space, there have been boundaries (Cukwurah, 1967; DeBlij, 1973). Little wonder that boundary studies have been the concern of scholars since classical times, through the middle ages to the present times. Although, the concept has evolved through the ages, from zones of separation to frontiers (no man’s land); or border regions and finally to its present form as a finite line of division, it has remained (either as frontier or boundary) a zone/line indicating the extent of the area of jurisdiction of one independent political community in relation to another (Weigert, et al, 1957; DeBlij, 1973). The emergence of modern boundaries as finite delimiters of geopolitical space evolved gradually over the ages, beginning from zones of separation or “no man’s land”, to the frontier, and finally, to the definite line on map and territorial limits.” Territoriality, being characterised by the enforcement of control over access to a geographic space as well as to things within it, or to things outside by restraining those within and outside its confines (Sack, 1986:32). Of course, since the creation and evolution of Humans and their interactive space, borders have often existed. Even though, the force of the border mentality may differ from one persons to and/or nations to the next, the principle recognition of points of divergence or convergence, points of division or exclusion and inclusion have since then been the conscious or unconscious preoccupation of individuals and states. Meanwhile states may incline more towards the latter formula owing to its awareness of the concept of territorial integrity, sovereignty and its aspiration to preservation of the status quo, most communities do so in appreciation the complementarily of its neighbors in terms of providing the available in situations of need by the other. This is what we term “good neighborliness.” This type of situation often provokes good, open and friendly and ix