Decolonising Colonial Education

-

Livres
379 pages
Lire un extrait
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus

Description

This book on decolonising education chastises, heartens and invites academics to seriously commence academic and intellectual manumission by challenging the current toxic episteme – the Western dominant Grand Narrative that embeds, espouses and superimposes itself on others. It exhorts African scholars in particular to unite and address the bequests of colonialism and its toxic episteme by confronting the internalised fabrications, hegemonic dominance, lies and myths that have caused many conflicts in world history. Such a toxic episteme founded on problematic experiments, theories and praxis has tended to license unsubstantiated views and stereotypes of others as intellectually impotent, moribund and of inferior humanity. The book invites academics and intellectuals to commit to a healthy dialogue among the world’s competing traditions of knowing and knowledge production to produce a truly accommodating and inclusive grand narrative informed by a recognition of a common and shared humanity.

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Ajouté le 23 septembre 2018
Nombre de lectures 1
EAN13 9789956550876
Langue English
Signaler un problème
Decolonising Colonial Education Decolonising Colonial Education Doing Away with Relics and Toxicity Embedded in the Racist Dominant Grand Narrative
Nkwazi Nkuzi Mhango
Decolonising Colonial Education: Doing Away with Relics and Toxicity Embedded in the Racist Dominant Grand Narrative Nkwazi Nkuzi Mhango
L a ng a a R esea rch & P u blishing CIG Mankon, Bamenda
Publisher:LangaaRPCIG Langaa Research & Publishing Common Initiative Group P.O. Box 902 Mankon Bamenda North West Region Cameroon Langaagrp@gmail.comwww.langaa-rpcig.net Distributed in and outside N. America by African Books Collective orders@africanbookscollective.com www.africanbookcollective.com
ISBN-10: 9956-550-27-2
ISBN-13: 978-9956-550-27-2
©Nkwazi Nkuzi Mhango 2018All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, mechanical or electronic, including photocopying and recording, or be stored in any information storage or retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher
As a thinker and member of a human family, I truly envisage a pivotally collective dream-cum-vision for peace and development for the human family through the decolonisation and detoxification of colonial education as espoused by the current dominant grand narrative. I envisage the world in which all grand narrative matters; and are treated equally in constructing a world grand narrative made after dialogues and agreement of the human family that will reconcile the well off and the worse off of the world. Nkwazi Mhango University of Manitoba Winnipeg Canada
Table of Contents
List of Images....................................................................... vii Acknowledgements .............................................................. ix Preface .................................................................................. xi List of Abbreviations ............................................................ xvii 1. Detoxifying Toxic and Hegemonic Education as Step to True Peace and Reconciliation of the World based on Equality ................... 1 2. The Role of True and Decolonised Education to Justice in the World Today Based on Historical Realities.......................................................... 37 3. Division as the Carryover of Toxic Education................................................................... 59 4. Toxic Education as an Offshoot of the Dominant Grand Narrative........................................ 89 5. Achieving Decolonised Education, the Need for Integrated Knowledge .................................... 113 6. Peace with Environment and Human Coexistence Based on Decolonised Education........................................................ 143 Genocide as the Legacy of Colonial Education: Two Case Studies ............................... 165 I). Rwandan Genocide: How Colonial Legacies Created It .............................................................. 170 II). Canada’s Genocide: How Hegemony Maintained It........................................................................ 193 III) Colonialism, Colonial Episteme and Terrorism……………………………………………………...201 7. Whose Story Should We Buy into or Ignore and Why? .................................................................. 211
v
8. Relationship and Peace and Conflict Based on Decolonised Education........................................ 247 9. Prescriptive Nature of Colonial and Toxic Education: How the Dominant Grand Narrative Monopolised Knowledge ..................................... 267 The System Asks for the Overhaul....................................... 275 10. Taking on the Dominant Grand Narrative as the Beneficiary and Creator of Toxic Education ............ 289 References ............................................................................ 333
vi
List of Images Figure 1 Photo; courtesy of readingthemaps.blogspot.com .........13
Figure 2 Photo; courtesy of definyourgrid.com..............................35
Figure 3 Photo; courtesy of edustank.blogspot.com......................57 Figure 4 Photo; courtesy of theblogofprogress.com......................87 Figure 5 Photo; courtesy of ei-ie.org ................................................ 111 Figure 6 Photo; courtesy of news.blogs.wlu.edu ............................118 Figure 7 Photo; courtesy ofwww.tiki-toki.com...........................411... Figure 8 Photo; courtesy of Reuters ................................................. 165 Figure 9 Photo; courtesy of sbs.com.au ........................................... 167
Figure 10 Photo; courtesy of socialist.ca.......................................... 182 Figure 11 Photo; courtesy of MacLean January 2015 ....................188 Figure 12 Photo; courtesy of likesuccess.com ................................209 Figure 13 Photo; courtesy of kuweight64.blogspot.com...............245 Figure 14 Photo; courtesy of izquote.com ...................................... 265 Figure 15 Photo; courtesy of solidmars.deviantart.com ................273 Figure 16 Photo; courtesy of jadour.wordpress.com .....................287 Figure 17 Photo; courtesy of pintrest.com ...................................... 329
vii
viii
Acknowledgements As ever, I acknowledge my wife Nesaa who contributed immensely in writing this tome. Her unconditional and unwavering support has always been second to none. So, too, our children mainly Ng’ani, Nkuzi and Nkwazi Jr, the youngest, do bear the brunt sometimes, especially when I am out for my researches and readings which lead to missing me at home at the normal times and occasions as their father. I hugely acknowledge my mentor, Professor Sean Byrne, has also been so instrumental to remind me not to stop writing apart from contributing some ideas as far as writing is concerned. Again, Byrne is the one who pushed me to the limits to write academic books after teaching me in my grad studies. I also would like to acknowledge Professor Jessica Senehi who has also been instrumental to me, especiallyvis-a-vis how to tell the story nicely. From these two professors and friends, I learned how to use a simplified language in telling my stories. No way can I thank my brother professor Eliakim Sibanda who enriched my knowledge, especially as the guru of History. There is no way I can complete my acknowledgements without mentioning the name of my brother, Professor Munyaradzi Mawere who has always encouraged me to think about Africa; and thus, do something about it. As well, my friends and readers Sirili Akko and Salih Hassan are acknowledged for their unwavering support. Lastly, I would like to acknowledge all academics, practitioners and readers who will pick up from where I ended in my quest for the decolonisation and detoxification of colonial education as it is embedded in the current dominant grand narrative.
ix