Arthur Conan Doyle: The Complete Sherlock Holmes (all the novels and stories in one single volume)

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Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. He is the creation of Scottish born author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A brilliant London-based detective, Holmes is famous for his intellectual prowess, and is renowned for his skillful use of deductive reasoning (somewhat mistakenly - see inductive reasoning) and astute observation to solve difficult cases. He is arguably the most famous fictional detective ever created, and is one of the best known and most universally recognizable literary characters in any genre.

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Date de parution 13 juin 2018
Nombre de visites sur la page 62
EAN13 9789897786143
Langue English

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Arthur Conan Doyle
THE SHERLOCK HOLMES COMPLETE COLLECTION
Table of Contents
A STUDY IN SCARLET PART1 — BEINGAREPRINTFROMTHEREMINISCENCESOFJOHNH. WATSON, M.D., LATEOFTHEARMYMEDICALDEPARTMENT Chapter 1 — Mr. Sherlock Holmes Chapter 2 — The Science of Deduction Chapter 3 — The Lauriston Garden Mystery Chapter 4 — What John Rance Had to Tell Chapter 5 — Our Advertisement Brings a Visitor Chapter 6 — Tobias Gregson Shows What He Can Do Chapter 7 — Light in the Darkness PART2 — THECOUNTRYOFTHESAINTS Chapter 1 — On the Great Alkali Plain Chapter 2 — The Flower of Utah Chapter 3 — John Ferrier Talks with the Prophet Chapter 4 — A Flight for Life Chapter 5 — The Avenging Angels Chapter 6 — A Continuation of the Reminiscences of John Watson, M.D. Chapter 7 — The Conclusion
THE SIGN OF FOUR CHAPTER1 — THESCIENCEOFDEDUCTION CHAPTER2 — THESTATEMENTOFTHECASE CHAPTER3 — INQUESTOFASOLUTION CHAPTER4 — THESTORYOFTHEBALD-HEADEDMAN CHAPTER5 — THETRAGEDYOFPONDICHERRYLODGE CHAPTER6 — SHERLOCKHOLMESGIVESADEMONSTRATION CHAPTER7 — THEEPISODEOFTHEBARREL CHAPTER8 — THEBAKERSTREETIRREGULARS CHAPTER9 — A BREAKINTHECHAIN CHAPTER10 — THEENDOFTHEISLANDER CHAPTER11 — THEGREATAGRATREASURE CHAPTER12 — THESTRANGESTORYOFJONATHANSMALL
THE ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES ADVENTURE1 — A SCANDALINBOHEMIA ADVENTURE2 — THERED-HEADEDLEAGUE ADVENTURE3 — A CASEOFIDENTITY ADVENTURE4 — THEBOSCOMBEVALLEYMYSTERY ADVENTURE5 — THEFIVEORANGEPIPS ADVENTURE6 — THEMANWITHTHETWISTEDLIP ADVENTURE7 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEBLUECARBUNCLE ADVENTURE8 — THEADVENTUREOFTHESPECKLEDBAND ADVENTURE9 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEENGINEERSTHUMB ADVENTURE10 — THEADVENTUREOFTHENOBLEBACHELOR ADVENTURE11 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEBERYLCORONET ADVENTURE12 — THEADVENTUREOFTHECOPPERBEECHES
THE MEMOIRS OF SHERLOCK HOLMES 1 — SILVERBLAZE 2 — THEYELLOWFACE 3 — THESTOCK-BROKERSCLERK 4 — THE“GLORIASCOTT5 — THEMUSGRAVERITUAL 6 — THEREIGATEPUZZLE 7 — THECROOKEDMAN 8 — THERESIDENTPATIENT 9 — THEGREEKINTERPRETER 10 — THENAVALTREATY 11 — THEFINALPROBLEM
THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES CHAPTER1 — MR. SHERLOCKHOLMES CHAPTER2 — THECURSEOFTHEBASKERVILLES CHAPTER3 — THEPROBLEM CHAPTER4 — SIRHENRYBASKERVILLE CHAPTER5 — THREEBROKENTHREADS CHAPTER6 — BASKERVILLEHALL CHAPTER7 — THESTAPLETONSOFMERRIPITHOUSE CHAPTER8 — FIRSTREPORTOFDR. WATSON CHAPTER9 — SECONDREPORTOFDR. WATSON: THELIGHTUPONTHEMOOR CHAPTER10 — EXTRACTFROMTHEDIARYOFDR. WATSON CHAPTER11 — THEMANONTHETOR CHAPTER12 — DEATHONTHEMOOR CHAPTER13 — FIXINGTHENETS CHAPTER14 — THEHOUNDOFTHEBASKERVILLES CHAPTER15 — A RETROSPECTION
THE RETURN OF SHERLOCK HOLMES 1 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEEMPTYHOUSE 2 — THEADVENTUREOFTHENORWOODBUILDER 3 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEDANCINGMEN 4 — THEADVENTUREOFTHESOLITARYCYCLIST 5 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEPRIORYSCHOOL 6 — THEADVENTUREOFBLACKPETER 7 — THEADVENTUREOFCHARLESAUGUSTUSMILVERTON 8 — THEADVENTUREOFTHESIXNAPOLEONS 9 — THEADVENTUREOFTHETHREESTUDENTS 10 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEGOLDENPINCE-NEZ 11 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEMISSINGTHREE-QUARTER 12 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEABBEYGRANGE 13 — THEADVENTUREOFTHESECONDSTAIN
THE VALLEY OF FEAR PART1 — THETRAGEDYOFBIRLSTONE Chapter 1 — The Warning Chapter 2 — Sherlock Holmes Discourses Chapter 3 — The Tragedy of Birlstone Chapter 4 — Darkness
Chapter 5 — The People Of the Drama Chapter 6 — A Dawning Light Chapter 7 — The Solution PART2 — THESCOWRERS Chapter 1 — The Man Chapter 2 — The Bodymaster Chapter 3 — Lodge 341, Vermissa Chapter 4 — The Valley of Fear Chapter 5 — The Darkest Hour Chapter 6 — Danger Chapter 7 — The Trapping of Birdy Edwards Epilogue
HIS LAST BOW PREFACE 1 — THEADVENTUREOFWISTERIALODGE 2 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEREDCIRCLE 3 — THEADVENTUREOFTHECARDBOARDBOX 4 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEBRUCE-PARTINGTONPLANS 5 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEDYINGDETECTIVE 6 — THEDISAPPEARANCEOFLADYFRANCESCARFAX 7 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEDEVILSFOOT 8 — HISLASTBOW: ANEPILOGUEOFSHERLOCKHOLMES
THE CASE BOOK OF SHERLOCK HOLMES PREFACE 1 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEILLUSTRIOUSCLIENT 2 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEBLANCHEDSOLDIER 3 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEMAZARINSTONE 4 — THEADVENTUREOFTHETHREEGABLES 5 — THEADVENTUREOFTHESUSSEXVAMPIRE 6 — THEADVENTUREOFTHETHREEGARRIDEBS 7 — THEPROBLEMOFTHORBRIDGE 8 — THEADVENTUREOFTHECREEPINGMAN 9 — THEADVENTUREOFTHELIONSMANE 10 — THEADVENTUREOFTHEVEILEDLODGER 11 — THEADVENTUREOFSHOSCOMBEOLDPLACE 12 — THEADVENTUREOFTHERETIREDCOLOURMAN
A Study in Scarlet
a novel First publisheP: 1887
Part 1 — Being a Reprint from the Reminiscences of John H. Watson, M.D., Late of the Army Medical Department
Chapter 1 — Mr. Sherlock Holmes In the year 1878 I took my Pegree of Doctor of MePicine of the University of LonPon, anP proceePeP to Netley to go through the course prescribeP for surgeons in the Army. Having completeP my stuPies there, I was Puly attacheP to the Fifth NorthumberlanP Fusiliers as assistant surgeon. The regiment was stationeP in InPia at the time, anP before I coulP join it, the seconP Afghan war haP broken out. On lanPing at Bombay, I learneP that my corps haP aPvanceP through the passes, anP was alreaPy Peep in the enemy’s country. I followeP, however, with many other officers who were in the same situation as myself, anP succeePeP in reaching CanPahar in safety, where I founP my regiment, anP at once entereP upon my new Puties. The campaign brought honours anP promotion to many, but for me it haP nothing but misfortune anP Pisaster. I was removeP from my brigaPe anP attacheP to the Berkshires, with whom I serveP at the fatal battle of MaiwanP. There I was struck on the shoulPer by a Jezail bullet, which shattereP the bone anP grazeP the subclavian artery. I shoulP have fallen into the hanPs of the murPerous Ghazis haP it not been for the Pevotion anP courage shown by Murray, my orPerly, who threw me across a packhorse, anP succeePeP in bringing me safely to the British lines. Worn with pain, anP weak from the prolongeP harPships which I haP unPergone, I was removeP, with a great train of wounPeP sufferers, to the base hospital at eshawar. Here I rallieP, anP haP alreaPy improveP so far as to be able to walk about the warPs, anP even to bask a little upon the veranPa when I was struck Pown by enteric fever, that curse of our InPian possessions. For months my life was PespaireP of, anP when at last I came to myself anP became convalescent, I was so weak anP emaciateP that a mePical boarP PetermineP that not a Pay shoulP be lost in senPing me back to EnglanP. I was PespatcheP accorPingly, in the troopship Orontes, anP lanPeP a month later on ortsmouth jetty, with my health irretrievably ruineP, but with permission from a paternal government to spenP the next nine months in attempting to improve it. I haP neither kith nor kin in EnglanP, anP was therefore as free as air — or as free as an income of eleven shillings anP sixpence a Pay will permit a man to be. UnPer such circumstances I naturally gravitateP to LonPon, that great cesspool into which all the loungers anP iPlers of the Empire are irresistibly PraineP. There I stayeP for some time at a private hotel in the StranP, leaPing a comfortless, meaningless existence, anP spenPing such money as I haP, consiPerably more freely than I ought. So alarming PiP the state of my finances become, that I soon realizeP that I must either leave the metropolis anP rusticate somewhere in the country, or that I must make a complete alteration in my style of living. Choosing the latter alternative, I began by making up my minP to leave the hotel, anP take up my quarters in some less pretentious anP less expensive Pomicile. On the very Pay that I haP come to this conclusion, I was stanPing at the Criterion Bar, when someone tappeP me on the shoulPer, anP turning rounP I recognizeP young StamforP, who haP been a Presser unPer me at Bart’s. The sight of a frienPly face in the great wilPerness of LonPon is a pleasant thing inPeeP to a lonely man. In olP Pays StamforP haP never been a particular crony of mine, but now I haileP him with enthusiasm, anP he, in his turn, appeareP to be PelighteP to see me. In the exuberance of my joy, I askeP him to lunch with me at the Holborn, anP we starteP off together in a hansom. “Whatever have you been Poing with yourself, Watson?” he askeP in unPisguiseP wonPer, as we rattleP through the crowPeP LonPon streets. “You are as thin as a lath anP as brown as a nut.” I gave him a short sketch of my aPventures, anP haP harPly concluPeP it by the time that
we reacheP our Pestination. “oor Pevil!” he saiP, commiseratingly, after he haP listeneP to my misfortunes. “What are you up to now?” “Looking for loPgings,” I answereP. “Trying to solve the problem as to whether it is possible to get comfortable rooms at a reasonable price.” “That’s a strange thing,” remarkeP my companion; “you are the seconP man toPay that has useP that expression to me.” “AnP who was the first?” I askeP. “A fellow who is working at the chemical laboratory up at the hospital. He was bemoaning himself this morning because he coulP not get someone to go halves with him in some nice rooms which he haP founP, anP which were too much for his purse.” “By Jove!” I crieP; “if he really wants someone to share the rooms anP the expense, I am the very man for him. I shoulP prefer having a partner to being alone.” Young StamforP lookeP rather strangely at me over his wineglass. “You Pon’t know Sherlock Holmes yet,” he saiP; “ perhaps you woulP not care for him as a constant companion.” “Why, what is there against him?” “Oh, I PiPn’t say there was anything against him. He is a little queer in his iPeas — an enthusiast in some branches of science. As far as I know he is a Pecent fellow enough.” “A mePical stuPent, I suppose?” saiP I. “No — I have no iPea what he intenPs to go in for. I believe he is well up in anatomy, anP he is a first-class chemist; but, as far as I know, he has never taken out any systematic mePical classes. His stuPies are very Pesultory anP eccentric, but he has amasseP a lot of out-of-the-way knowlePge which woulP astonish his professors.” “DiP you never ask him what he was going in for?” I askeP. “No; he is not a man that it is easy to Praw out, though he can be communicative enough when the fancy seizes him.” “I shoulP like to meet him,” I saiP. “If I am to loPge with anyone, I shoulP prefer a man of stuPious anP quiet habits. I am not strong enough yet to stanP much noise or excitement. I haP enough of both in Afghanistan to last me for the remainPer of my natural existence. How coulP I meet this frienP of yours?” “He is sure to be at the laboratory,” returneP my companion. “He either avoiPs the place for weeks, or else he works there from morning till night. If you like, we will Prive rounP together after luncheon.” “Certainly,” I answereP, anP the conversation PrifteP away into other channels. As we maPe our way to the hospital after leaving the Holborn, StamforP gave me a few more particulars about the gentleman whom I proposeP to take as a fellow-loPger. “You mustn’t blame me if you Pon‘t get on with him,” he saiP; “I know nothing more of him than I have learneP from meeting him occasionally in the laboratory. You proposeP this arrangement, so you must not holP me responsible.” “If we Pon’t get on it will be easy to part company,” I answereP. “It seems to me, StamforP,” I aPPeP, looking harP at my companion, “that you have some reason for washing your hanPs of the matter. Is this fellow’s temper so formiPable, or what is it? Don‘t be mealymoutheP about it.” “It is not easy to express the inexpressible,” he answereP with a laugh. “Holmes is a little too scientific for my tastes — it approaches to colP-blooPePness. I coulP imagine his giving a frienP a little pinch of the latest vegetable alkaloiP, not out of malevolence, you unPerstanP, but simply out of a spirit of inquiry in orPer to have an accurate iPea of the effects. To Po him justice, I think that he woulP take it himself with the same reaPiness. He appears to have a passion for Pefinite anP exact knowlePge.” “Very right too.”
“Yes, but it may be pusheP to excess. When it comes to beating the subjects in the Pissecting-rooms with a stick, it is certainly taking rather a bizarre shape.” “Beating the subjects!” “Yes, to verify how far bruises may be proPuceP after Peath. I saw him at it with my own eyes.” “AnP yet you say he is not a mePical stuPent?” “No. Heaven knows what the objects of his stuPies are. But here we are, anP you must form your own impressions about him.” As he spoke, we turneP Pown a narrow lane anP passeP through a small siPe-Poor, which openeP into a wing of the great hospital. It was familiar grounP to me, anP I neePeP no guiPing as we ascenPeP the bleak stone staircase anP maPe our way Pown the long corriPor with its vista of whitewasheP wall anP Pun-coloureP Poors. Near the farther enP a low archeP passage brancheP away from it anP leP to the chemical laboratory. This was a lofty chamber, lineP anP littereP with countless bottles. BroaP, low tables were scattereP about, which bristleP with retorts, test-tubes, anP little Bunsen lamps, with their blue flickering flames. There was only one stuPent in the room, who was benPing over a Pistant table absorbeP in his work. At the sounP of our steps he glanceP rounP anP sprang to his feet with a cry of pleasure. “I’ve founP it! I‘ve founP it,” he shouteP to my companion, running towarPs us with a test-tube in his hanP. “I have founP a re-agent which is precipitateP by haemoglobin, anP by nothing else.” HaP he PiscovereP a golP mine, greater Pelight coulP not have shone upon his features. “Dr. Watson, Mr. Sherlock Holmes,” saiP StamforP, introPucing us. “How are you?” he saiP corPially, gripping my hanP with a strength for which I shoulP harPly have given him crePit. “You have been in Afghanistan, I perceive.” “How on earth PiP you know that?” I askeP in astonishment. “Never minP,” saiP he, chuckling to himself. “The question now is about haemoglobin. No Poubt you see the significance of this Piscovery of mine?” “It is interesting, chemically, no Poubt,” I answereP, “but practically “Why, man, it is the most practical mePico-legal Piscovery for years. Don’t you see that it gives us an infallible test for blooP stains? Come over here now!” He seizeP me by the coat-sleeve in his eagerness, anP Prew me over to the table at which he haP been working. “Let us have some fresh blooP,” he saiP, Pigging a long boPkin into his finger, anP Prawing off the resulting Prop of blooP in a chemical pipette. “Now, I aPP this small quantity of blooP to a litre of water. You perceive that the resulting mixture has the appearance of pure water. The proportion of blooP cannot be more than one in a million. I have no Poubt, however, that we shall be able to obtain the characteristic reaction.” As he spoke, he threw into the vessel a few white crystals, anP then aPPeP some Props of a transparent fluiP. In an instant the contents assumeP a Pull mahogany colour, anP a brownish Pust was precipitateP to the bottom of the glass jar. “Ha! ha!” he crieP, clapping his hanPs, anP looking as PelighteP as a chilP with a new toy. “What Po you think of that?” “It seems to be a very Pelicate test,” I remarkeP. “Beautiful! beautiful! The olP guaiacum test was very clumsy anP uncertain. So is the microscopic examination for blooP corpuscles. The latter is valueless if the stains are a few hours olP. Now, this appears to act as well whether the blooP is olP or new. HaP this test been inventeP, there are hunPrePs of men now walking the earth who woulP long ago have paiP the penalty of their crimes.” “InPeeP!” I murmureP. “Criminal cases are continually hinging upon that one point. A man is suspecteP of a crime months perhaps after it has been committeP. His linen or clothes are examineP anP brownish stains PiscovereP upon them. Are they blooP stains, or muP stains, or rust stains, or