Partition How to Sing, How to Sing, Meine Gesangskunst, Lehmann, Lilli

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Pratiquez les partitions de morceau How to Sing How to Sing, par Lehmann, Lilli. Partition de style romantique.
Cette partition aborde plusieurs mouvements et une subtile association d'instruments.
Obtenez encore tout une collection de musique sur YouScribe, dans la catégorie Partitions de musique romantique.
Rédacteur: English translation Richard Aldrich (1863-1937)
Edition: New York: MacMillan, 1914

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HOW TO SING
[MEINE GESANGSKUN8T]
BY
LILLI LEHMANN
TRANSLATED FROM THE GEBJIAN
BY
RICHARD ALDRICH
NZW AND RBVIBBD BDITION
NdD 1m
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
1914
\,PREFACE TO THE REVISED EDITION
THE object of the first edition is attained.
The book has opened the eyes of many to the
nature of the art of song. All those who have
,--. \.
anything to say or write must expect to meet
misinterpretations: there are just as many
ideas and modes of expressing the same thing
88 there are listeners and readers.
I have endeavored, in this second edition,
to foresta1l misinterpretations and to express
-', -.
... ,,) better what I had to say in the first. It must
not be thought that I lay claim to anything
new. But I do lay claim to having translated
that which has often been said and likewise
misunderstood, into the language of the singer
who can only guide himself by tone BenBationa
and learn therefrom.
Only a few are chosen, - not all can become
great artists. But every one who devotes him-vi PREFACE TO THE REVISED EDITION
self earnestly to this vocation should endeavor
to attain the highest ejJi£iency. Even though
the theatre has experienced an incisive reform
and will again and again, I do not see why we
should not hold ourselves responsible for the
technique of the art of song, the beauty and the
preservation of the human voice of which we
shall always stand in need. Without a thorough
knowledge of technique, the art is an impossi­
bility or is insufficient. To keep our bodies
supple and healthy we take gymnastic exer­
cises. Why then should not singers also take
daily gymnastic exercises with their vocal
organs so as to preserve their material for their
profession? Technique is inseparable from art.
Only by mastering the technique of his material
is the artist in a condition to mould his mental
work of art and to again give it - his posses­
sion borrowed from life - to others. Even
artists intellectually highly gifted remain
crippled without this mastery of the technique.
Surely every great artist has now and then ex­
perienced it himself.PREFACE TO THE REVISED EDmON vii
Only because I feel myself 80 small and im­
perfect in the face of our great art of song,
only because I see how much there is still left
to learn do I from the bottom of my heart
wish and hope that others will do it better than
I to whom no one will be able to deny at least
two things: seriousness and the highest respect
for art and capability.
LILLI LEHMANN.
8cJLua'Lmo, MONDso,
January, 1914.CONTENTS
.~..
My PcllPOSE • 1
My TITLB TO WBITB OB THI: ABT 01' SoRG. 4:
SECTION I
PBBLlJI'INA.BY PBAOTICIt 9
SECTION IT
01' TUB BBBATH • 28
SECTION III
OJ' TUIt BBEATH AlfD WHIRLING CUllBEXT8. 88
SECTION IV
TSE SmGRB'S PHYSIOLOGIOAL STUDIBS 40
SECTION V
EQUALlZIKG THE VOIOB - FOB.
SECTION VI
Tu. ATTACK .um TBB VOWBLS. 69
SECTION VII
NASAL-NA8AL SINGING • 88
IxCONTENTS
SECTION vm
.~..
THE HEAD VOIOB 96
SECTION IX
SD8ATIOK AIm POIITIOK 01' THB TOKGn • 110
SECTION X
THI: S08ATlon 01' THI: N08•• • 118
SECTION XI
TBB S.KIATIOKS 01' THB PALATB • 115
SECTION XU
To S••SATIOK 01' THIt RB80NANOE 01' TRE BUD
CAVITIB8 • 129
SECTION xm
OK VGOAL BBGI8T.B8 - Voc.u. BAKGI:S • • 1M
SECTION XIV
DBVIDLOPIIDT AIm EQuALlZATlOK • • 1&1
SECTION XV
WHIU VOlcmS • 188
SECTION XVI
TOODOB WAORTa. • 18'1
SECTION xvn
TRIC HIGHB8T HU.D To.a • 17'1CONTENTS zi
SECTION xvm ....
TBB TBB.oLO 178
SECTION XIX
TBB CURl: 184:
SECTION XX
THE TOBGU_ . 189
SECTION XXI
PJucPA.BATION :rOB SINGING. 197
SECTION xxn
P081TION OP TO MOUTH 200
SECTION XXIII
THE CONNBCTIOB 01' VOWJ:L8 204:
SECTION XXIV
TBB LIPS 216
SECTION XXV
Tim Vown SoUlfD AH 01' FOBIIBB DATI 118
SEOTION XXVI
ITALUX AXD GU.AX. • 2'J8
SECTION XXVII
AUDLIAaY VOWELS 280CONTENTS
SECTION xxvm
flA8.
BBsO:RA:RT Co.aONAIna • 288
SECTION XXIX
PRA.CTICAL EXBRCI8ES. • 286
SECTION XXX
THB GREAT ScALB • 242
SECTION XXXI
VBLOCITY • 251
SECTION xxxn
TRILL • • 258
SECTION XXXIII
How TO BOLD ONB'a SEL,. WHEN PRAOTI8ING. • 263
SECTION XXXIV
PBOlfUKCUTlON - CONSONANTS • • 270
SECTION XXXV
COKCBBKINa EXPRK88105 • • 800
SECTION XXXVI
BEJ'ORE THE PUBLIC • • 802CONTENTS
SECTION XXXVII
PAe.
IKTBBPBJ:TATIOlf • • 807
SECTION XXXVllI
Ilf CONCLUSION • 820
NOTB-A GOOD REMEDY I'OR CATABBB A.ND
HOABSJDfa. • • 828MY PURPOSE
My purpose is to discuss simply, intelligently,
yet from a practical standpoint, sensations
known to us in singing, and exactly ascertained
in my experience, by the expressions "singing
open," "covered," "dark," "nasal," "in the
head," or "in the neck," "forward," or "back."
These expressions correspond to our sensations
in singing; but they are unintelligible as long
88 the causes of those sensations are unknown,
and each one has a different idea of their mean­
ing. Many singers try their whole lives long
to produce them and never succeed. This
happens because science understands too little
of singing, the singer too little of science. I
mean that the physiological explanations of the
highly complicated processes of singing are
not plainly enough put Jor the singer, who must
depend chiefly on his vocal sensations. Scien­
tific men are not at all agreed as to the exact
B 1