CREATING A CLUB

CREATING A CLUB

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CREATING A CLUB Level 2, 140 King StreetMelbourne VIC 3000 PO Box 13285 Law Courts VIC 8010 Tel: +61 3 8621 8600 Fax: +61 3 9614 4308 Email: infonet@netball.asn.au Web: www.netball.asn.au All Australia Netball Association Ltd. ABN 66 001 142 818 Trading as Netball Australia Introduction Netball clubs are established for many reasons. Typically however, new clubs are formed as communities grow or as a result of existing organisations expanding their operations. The process of creating a new netball club is a complex one and needs to be carefully planned if the club is to succeed in the long term. Fostering a wide cross ‐section of community involvement is vital for the long ‐term viability of the club. Flowchart – Creating a Club Initial interest or reason for establishing a new club Collect and review community information Key community contact input No Do not Is the club viable? proceed Create Awareness Yes Hold public meeting No Do not Motion to establish club passed? proceed Yes Establish interim committee Develop Club Plan Yes Hold inaugural annual general meeting Establish Club Extract from Sport & Recreation Queensland - establishing a club.

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Publié le 13 janvier 2012
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Langue English
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Level 2, 140 King Street
Melbourne VIC 3000
PO Box 13285
Law Courts VIC 8010
Tel: +61 3 8621 8600
Fax: +61 3 9614 4308
Email: infonet@netball.asn.au
Web: www.netball.asn.au
All Australia Netball Association Ltd.
ABN 66 001 142 818
Trading as Netball Australia
CREATING A CLUB
Creating a Club
2
Introduction
Netball clubs are established for many reasons. Typically however, new clubs are formed as
communities grow or as a result of existing organisations expanding their operations.
The process of creating a new netball club is a complex one and needs to be carefully planned if the club
is to succeed in the long term. Fostering a wide cross
section of community involvement is vital for the
long
term viability of the club.
Flowchart – Creating a Club
I
nitial interest or reason for establishing a new club
Collect and review community information
Do not
proceed
Do not
proceed
No
No
Key community contact input
Yes
Is the club viable?
Hold public meeting
Yes
Motion to establish club passed?
Establish Club
Create
Awareness
Yes
Establish interim committee
Hold inaugural annual general meeting
Develop Club
Plan
Extract from Sport & Recreation Queensland - establishing a club. 2004
Creating a Club
3
Planning
Although people may feel the establishment of a new club is required, or have a strong personal interest
in developing the sport of netball, this is not enough to accurately gauge the extent of potential demand
for the club or its likelihood of survival.
The process needs to be approached as if you were seeking to create a small business in the area. In
other words, you need to undertake some basic ‘research’ to determine the likely success of the
venture. It is important to have factual data against which other types of information (e.g. assumptions,
opinions, input from the community) can be evaluated. The information will also be invaluable when
developing the club plan and seeking funding assistance.
Some questions that need to be answered during the planning process are:
What are the netball activity patterns and interests of the local community?
What facilities currently exist?
What is the demographic profile of the community (eg age, sex, occupation, income)?
Is the demographic profile expected to change over time?
What is the current population and expected growth rate?
What future plans does the local council have for the area?
The next step is to complete this checklist:
‰
Does netball already exist in the area?
‰
Is it active?
‰
Does it cater for its members?
‰
Are there already netball courts in the area? If so is there sufficient demand to sustain another
netball club?
‰
What is the potential for funding/sponsorship in the area?
‰
Will the new netball club be able to share existing facilities/equipment or will they need to
purchase their own? At what cost?
‰
Is storage available at the facility? If so, will this need to be shared?
‰
Where will funds come from?
‰
Will there be enough volunteers to help with establishing the new club?
If it appears that there is sufficient demand as well as the necessary resources within the community,
then the establishment process can proceed to the next stage. This involves holding a public meeting,
forming an interim committee and conducting the inaugural general meeting.
Creating a Club
4
Initial Public Meeting
A meeting of all those interested in being part of the new netball club, whether its players or officials,
such as the committee and coaches, must be organised. The meeting needs to be widely advertised in a
number of different ways using a variety of sources (local paper, radio, TV, Internet, community centres,
schools etc).
The first meeting needs to be well structured to ensure that the outcome is achieved (determining
whether a new netball club is sustainable). The following is a suggested meeting process:
Welcome and explain briefly the reason for the meeting.
Record names, addresses and telephone numbers and any special interest or skills of the people
attending and those who may have been unable to attend.
Summarise the key findings and issues arising from the research and initial community contact
phase.
Guest speakers .
General discussion and opportunity for questions.
Re
evaluate whether to form the netball club.
Vote on whether to form the netball club.
Elect an interim committee to coordinate further development of the club structure.
Determine a timeline for the establishment process (eg. bylaws, general meeting).
The Interim Committee
The interim committee should have wider representation than just the founders of the club.
Keep in
mind the size of the committee for it to remain operational.
Determine the main areas of responsibility
e.g. membership, fundraising and finances. The key positions include President, Secretary and Treasurer.
The interim committee must carry out the following tasks before the inaugural general meeting:
Draft a constitution or charter to cover the aims, objectives and rules under which the club will run.
Start developing the club plan. This is a critical stage of inception, the committee should begin long
term planning immediately.
Develop a draft budget and indicate possible sources of funding.
Develop a database of prospective members.
Determine the most effective means of attracting new members.
Establish links with other sport and recreation organisations, schools or community groups (eg invite
them to be represented at meetings).
Finalise a date for the first general meeting of the new club.
Investigate incorporation for the club. This can protect individual members in certain situations and
give your club the right to sign contracts, lease premises, operate bank accounts etc.
Creating a Club
5
Developing a Plan
A strategic plan outlines the purpose and direction of the club. This is a useful marketing document
whether it is to target potential members, sponsors or the media. A plan may also outline the rights and
obligations of the organisation’s members.
There are four sections, which may be included when writing a plan:
Section 1: Introduction and rationale
This section plans to determine why the netball club was created and for whom?
Include the following:
A brief background and rationale for the need for the club (based on earlier research).
Types of membership planned — (eg individual/ family/ group/ associate/school).
The future direction of the club.
Section 2: Activities and services
This section aims to answer what activities and services the club will provide?
Include the following information:
What services will the netball Club provide and what will be the cost of these services to
participants?
What are the benefits of being a member?
What participation opportunities are there, for example social/ competitive/ non
competitive?
What skill development opportunities are there? How can they be accessed?
How wide
ranging are the activities? Do they cater for children, older adults, people with
disabilities? How do they cater for each of the groups?
What resources are available? Does the club have any access to books, videos, kits or pamphlets?
What equipment/facilities exist?
What education/training opportunities exist and in what format?
What support services (such as child minding) are available?
What social events/opportunities does the club offer?
Outline risk management procedures.
Creating a Club
6
Section 3: Organisational structures and processes
This section aims to identify how and when the committee is elected?
Include the following:
Who is on the committee? What are their roles and responsibilities?
What is the overall club structure? — a diagram may help.
What support roles are there? — administrators/backup eg canteen workers.
How to volunteer?
What support is provided to volunteers? — eg training, reimbursement of expenses, incentives and
recognition.
How will the club be structured?
What linkages or relationships exist with other associations, including local government/ state
sporting organisation of the activity/ regional associations/ other sport and recreation
organisations/ community groups/ schools.
What communication systems / channels exist?
Is there a newsletter?
Are there codes of behaviour for participants, parents of participants, officials?
Section 4: Finances
This section plans how will the club be financed?
Include the following:
How the club operates financially eg membership fees.
Where funds/grants are expected to be sourced and applied for?
What sponsorship does the club have and/or plan to seek?
How are sponsors acknowledged?
What assets (including facilities) does the club have?
Creating a Club
7
Inaugural General Meeting
At 21 days prior to the intended date, the interim committee should circulate to potential members:
The proposed constitution and bylaws;
Budget; and
Notice of when this first general meeting will be held.
A wide variety of sources and types of media should be used to promote awareness.
Suggested meeting process:
Welcome, roll call and apologies
Distribute sign
up and contact details sheet
Description of interim committee's activities since the initial meeting
Discussion of proposed constitution and bylaws and any suggested amendments
Vote on adoption of constitution and bylaws
Discuss structure of new committee and roles of each member
Elect officers
Discuss the various tasks needing to be completed before the next meeting
Set membership fees for the first year
Any general business
Date of the next meeting
Creating a Club
8
Checklist
Your netball club should now be established. Complete the following checklist to determine whether
you are ready to operate.
Circle the correct response
Facilities are available for training and competition
x
The facilities are safe and suitable
x
Council has approved the use of the facilities
x
A facility audit check has been carried out
x
A constitution has been written
x
By
laws for operation are written down
x
We have become incorporated
x
A committee is able to be formed
x
Volunteer positions descriptions have been completed
x
A registration process is in place
x
We have affiliated with our local Association or Member Organisation
x
If the club is not affiliated, alternative insurance for members has been sought
x
Enough coaches are available
x
A bank account has been set up
x
A database or area is available to store secure documents
x
Are the necessary forms available e.g. medical, registration
x
Policies in place re
grading selection, member protection
x
A uniform has been designed
x
Fees have been set
x
The club has been promoted in various ways – schools, newspaper
x
Is there sufficient and suitable equipment available
x
We offer suitable programs to our members e.g. Netta
x
Is there enough umpires available
x
Someone has obtained First Aid qualifications
x
Activities that are suitable for juniors e.g. Net Set GO!
x
Creating a Club
9
Frequently Asked Questions
1. How do we write a constitution?
Each State/Territory will have an Association Incorporation Act that also provides ‘Model Rules’ which
outlines the content requirements.
www.legislation.act.gov.au
www.fairtrading.nsw.gov.au
www.consumer.vic.gov.au
www.docep.wa.gov.au
www.consumer.tas.gov.au
www.ocba.sa.gov.au
www.legislation.qld.gov.au
www.nt.gov.au/justice
In developing a constitution, consider the following:
keep it simple and short;
make it flexible (by allowing for by
laws);
state your objectives clearly; and
have a wind
up clause (be definite about the distribution of assets should your organisation
dissolve).
2. Do we have to incorporate?
No. But it can protect individual members in certain situations and give your organisation for example
the right to sign contracts, lease premises or operate bank accounts.
3. What is an incorporated club or Association?
Has no less than five members
Has incorporate status and therefore a common seal
Is ongoing, has perpetual succession
Has the power to sue or be sued
Has the power to acquire or hold property
Furthermore, the office bearers and members are not personally liable for the debts of the Association,
nor the negligent acts or omissions of other office bearers and members, unless the rules specifically
provide otherwise.
4. How do we become insured?
If your club participates in a Member Organisation affiliated competition or program, public liability
insurance / association insurance and personal accident insurance is provided.
Creating a Club
10
For further information, please refer to the following websites:
Australian Sports Commission
Sport and Recreation ACT
NSW Department of Tourism, Sport and Recreation
Northern Territory Department of Local Government, Housing and Sport
Sport & Recreation Queensland
Office for Recreation & Sport South Australia
Sport and Recreation Tasmania
Sport and Recreation Victoria
Department of Sport and Recreation Western Australia