935 pages
Français

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus
935 pages
Français
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus

Description

COMMENTARY

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Publié le 08 décembre 2010
Nombre de lectures 67
Langue Français
Poids de l'ouvrage 6 Mo

Extrait

Project Gutenberg's A Commentary on Herodotus, by W. W. How and J. Wells
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: A Commentary on Herodotus
Author: W. W. How
J. Wells
Release Date: January 3, 2008 [EBook #24146]
Language: English
Character set encoding: UTF-8
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK A COMMENTARY ON HERODOTUS ***A COMMENTARY ON HERODOTUS 
With Introduction and Appendixes 
By W. W. How (Fellow and Tutor Of Merton College) and 
J. Wells (Warden of Wadham College, 1913–1927) 
____________________ 
Note to the Electronic Edition 
A Commentary on Herodotus was originally published in 1912 in two volumes by 
Oxford University Press, and was revised, with additional notes, in 1928. It is an 
extraordinary work of scholarship, and still the only complete English language 
commentary on Herodotus. Although it is undeniably out‐of‐date in places, it just 
as undeniably continues to be the essential companion for the study of Herodotus’ 
Histories. 
My goal in creating this electronic edition was to provide readers with a version 
which is complete, accurate, and easy to use. Portions of the underlying text were 
derived from the incomplete electronic edition developed by the Perseus Project, 
to which I am grateful. (The Perseus edition is available under a Creative 
Commons 2.5 Generic, Non‐Commercial, “Share Alike” license.) The remainder of 
the running text was scanned and converted to text using Abby FineReader 
software, while the various tables, charts, and diagrams were recreated manually. 
The resulting text was then proofread line by line against the Oxford and the 
Perseus editions, enabling me to identify and correct errors originating in the 
earlier texts along with any new errors from my digitization. To enhance the 
usability of the new text, it was reformatted, and the inconsistent systems for 
enumeration, citation, and abbreviation were standardized. A list of the cited 
ancient authors and works, along with their abbreviations, has been added to the 
prefatory matter. To aid in navigation, the text is bookmarked by the book and 
chapter number of the Histories, or by appendix and section. To insure a readable 
and consistent appearance, I chose a standard Microsoft font, Palatino Linotype, 
which contains a full set of polytonic Greek characters in all styles, including bold 
and italic. For a handful of ancient Phoenician characters, I have used the 
Alphabetum font developed by classicist Juan‐José Marcos, which is the most 
complete Unicode font available for classical languages. 
Two elements of the printed edition have not been reproduced. The first is the 
maps, omitted because they do not scan well, and because better versions are 
readily available online as well as in a variety of inexpensive historical atlases—
and especially in the forthcoming Landmark Herodotus, edited by Robert Strassler 
(Pantheon). The second missing element is the original index, omitted because it is 
 not thorough (as the authors acknowledged), and because it locates entries by 
reference to the page number of the printed edition, rather than by reference to the 
book and chapter of the Histories. I hope that the capability of full text search will 
more than offset this omission. 
Undoubtedly, despite my care, there are still errors and inconsistencies in this new 
edition. I will be grateful if you report these to me, so that I may correct them. 
Also, I can provide the complete text in Microsoft Word .DOC or .DOCX formats, 
better edition for future with style tags, to anyone who wishes to create a yet 
readers—who I hope will continue to find both enlightenment and delight in the 
Father of History. 
—Chuck Bennett, San Clemente, October 2007 
contact: clbennett@cox.net 
Preface 1912 
This commentary on Herodotus was planned and begun by Mr. H. D. Leigh, of 
Corpus Christi, in conjunction with Mr. How, more than ten years ago. At the time 
of his too early death, Mr. Leigh had written notes and excursuses on the first 
book; but unfortunately they were found to be on too large a scale for the present 
work, although the material collected in them was most valuable, and was largely 
used. Thus for the book as it now is we are entirely responsible. We have been 
frequently interrupted by more pressing duties, and we fear that in a work the 
composition of which has thus been spread over many years, some inconsistencies 
may have crept in undetected. The readers of the Clarendon Press have earned our 
sincere gratitude by their zeal and care in removing blemishes of form, but for any 
graver faults that remain we can only ask indulgence. 
The commentary on books i–iv, with the corresponding appendixes, has been 
written by Mr. Wells, that on books v–ix, also with the appendixes, by Mr. How. 
We have each read and re‐read the otherʹs work, but the ultimate responsibility for 
the views expressed rests in the first volume with Mr. Wells, in the second with 
Mr. How. 
Since the book is intended principally for the use of undergraduates, we have 
prefixed short summaries of the subject‐matter to the various sections of the notes, 
and for the same reason we have, where possible, quoted English translations of 
foreign works, and have referred to antiquities readily accessible in 

  • Univers Univers
  • Ebooks Ebooks
  • Livres audio Livres audio
  • Presse Presse
  • Podcasts Podcasts
  • BD BD
  • Documents Documents
Alternate Text