Introduction to Nuclear Engineering
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Introduction to Nuclear Engineering

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Idaho State University and University of Idaho Introduction to Nuclear Engineering UI: NE 450 Principles of Nuclear Engineering ISU: NE 402 Fundamentals of Nuclear Science & Engineering Fall Semester 2009 August 25 – December 17 LECTURE  _1 Introduction Course Description A Few Basics / Chapter 1
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Nombre de lectures 17
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Task−Technology Fit for Mobile Information Systems
Judith Gebauer
University of Illinois at Urbana−Champaign
Michael J. Shaw Michele L. Gribbins
University of Illinois at Urbana−Champaign University of Illinois at Urbana−Champaign
Abstract
Mobile information systems (IS) hold great promise to support organizational processes.
Clear guidelines, however, of how to design effective mobile IS in support of organizational
processes have not been developed. Based on earlier research that emphasizes the importance
of fit between organizational tasks and technology and that develops fit profiles for specific
task−technology combinations, this paper develops a task−technology fit (TTF) profile for
mobile IS to support managerial tasks. We suggest a three−way match between dimensions
of managerial tasks, mobile IS, and the mobile use context. We find that use situations
characterized by high distraction and poor quality of network connection are particularly
challenging for the design of mobile IS, and that the user interface requires particular
attention. The proposed conceptual model of task−technology fit provides guidelines for the
design of effective mobile IS and for future research studies.
This working paper replaces 2005 Working Paper #05−0119
Published: 6/26/2006
URL: http://www.business.uiuc.edu/Working_Papers/papers/06−0107.pdfTask−Technology Fit for Mobile Information Systems
Judith Gebauer
University of Illinois at Urbana−Champaign
Michael J. Shaw Michele L. Gribbins
University of Illinois at Urbana−Champaign University of Illinois at Urbana−Champaign
Abstract
Mobile information systems (IS) hold great promise to support organizational processes.
Clear guidelines, however, of how to design effective mobile IS in support of organizational
processes have not been developed. Based on earlier research that emphasizes the importance
of fit between organizational tasks and technology and that develops fit profiles for specific
task−technology combinations, this paper develops a task−technology fit (TTF) profile for
mobile IS to support managerial tasks. We suggest a three−way match between dimensions
of managerial tasks, mobile IS, and the mobile use context. We find that use situations
characterized by high distraction and poor quality of network connection are particularly
challenging for the design of mobile IS, and that the user interface requires particular
attention. The proposed conceptual model of task−technology fit provides guidelines for the
design of effective mobile IS and for future research studies.
Published: 6/26/2006
Entered: June 26, 2006.Task-Technology Fit for Mobile Information Systems

Judith Gebauer, Michael J. Shaw, Michele L. Gribbins
{gebauer|mjshaw|mgribbin}@uiuc.edu

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
College of Business
Department of Business Administration

350 Wohlers Hall
1206 South Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820

Last updated: June 21, 2006

Abstract
Mobile information systems (IS) hold great promise to support organizational processes. Clear guidelines,
however, of how to design effective mobile IS in support of organizational processes have not been
developed. Based on earlier research that emphasizes the importance of fit between organizational tasks
and technology and that develops fit profiles for specific task-technology combinations, this paper
develops a task-technology fit (TTF) profile for mobile IS to support managerial tasks. We suggest a
three-way match between dimensions of managerial tasks, mobile IS, and the mobile use context. We find
that use situations characterized by high distraction and poor quality of network connection are
particularly challenging for the design of mobile IS, and that the user interface requires particular
attention. The proposed conceptual model of task-technology fit provides guidelines for the design of
effective mobile IS and for future research studies.
Keywords: Mobile information systems, managerial tasks, task-technology fit
1Motivation
The relationships among technology, organizational processes, and performance are of great
interest to organizational researchers (Orlikowski 2000). Technologies now exist that enable employees
to “stay close to their local situations while engaging in global activities critical to their company’s
sustainability (Malhotra and Majchrazk 2005).” One such technology is mobile information systems (IS).
The ubiquitous nature of mobile IS provide new opportunities, issues and challenges (Lyytinnen and Yoo
2002a, 2002b) to organizations as they adopt these new technologies into their processes with the hopes
of enhancing performance. While mobile IS that are deployed to support an increasingly mobile
workforce promise to improve organizational processes (Balasubramaniam, Peterson, and Jarvenpaa
2002; Computerworld 2003), many questions remain concerning technology development, applications
and business models (Agrawal, Chari, and Sankar 2003; Smith, Kulatilaka, and Venkatraman 2002;
Tarasewich, Nickerson, and Warkentin 2002; Zhang, Yuan, and Archer 2003). In particular, the
requirements of mobile IS to adequately support mobile professionals have not been identified
systematically.
This paper integrates earlier research in the areas of organizational tasks, mobile technology, and
task-technology fit in order to develop a profile of task-technology fit (TTF) for mobile IS, with the intent
to contribute to the effectiveness and success of mobile IS in organizational settings. More specifically,
we hope to identify areas where the deployment of mobile IS can be considered particularly promising or
difficult to achieve due to the use context. Our results help assess and explain the success of mobile IS
applications within organizations, while providing conceptual guidelines for system development. In
addition, our systematically derived propositions comprise a research framework that can guide future
research studies. In the following, we first discuss our conceptual bases of earlier research publications of
task-technology fit, managerial tasks and mobile IS. We then develop a profile of task-technology fit for
mobile IS, discuss the implications of our propositions, draw a number of conclusions, and point out
avenues for future research.
2Two Theories of Task-Technology Fit
Two largely independent theories of TTF have emerged. The first, initiated by Goodhue and
Thompson (1995), established TTF as an important concept in assessing and explaining IS success. The
second, initiated by Zigurs and Buckland (1998), developed a systematic profile for the task-technology
combination of group tasks and group support systems (GSS). While Goodhue and Thompson (1995)
focused on individuals’ use of IS and presented a primarily positivistic research approach applicable to IS
in general, Zigurs and Buckland (1998) focused on groups’ use of IS and formulated fit profile applicable
specifically to GSS. Both streams are reviewed next.
Task-Technology Fit to Explain IS Success
Goodhue and Thompson (1995) proposed a comprehensive technology-to-performance model
that included characteristics of information technology, tasks, and of the individual user as explanatory
variables for technology use and for individual performance. A simpler version of the technology-to-
performance model, referred to as the TTF model, found moderate empirical support for the direct links
between task and technology characteristics and user-perceived TTF. Results confirmed that TTF and
usage together better explained the impact of information technology on individual performance (i.e.,
user-perceived accomplishment of individual tasks) than usage alone.
Related studies broadly confirmed the relevance of the TTF construct to assess the value of an IS
(Goodhue 1995) and to assess and predict system usage (Dishaw and Strong 1998) and individual
performance (Goodhue et al. 2000). Staples and Seddon (2004) confirmed that the technology-to-
performance model can explain performance for both mandatory and voluntary use settings. Different
aspects of TTF have been confirmed relevant for IS in general (Ferratt and Vlahos 1998, Goodhue 1995,
Goodhue 1998, Goodhue et al. 1997, and Goodhue and Thompson 1995), as well as for specific
technologies (Dishaw and Strong 1998, 1999; Goodhue et al. 2000), and for a variety of tasks (Dishaw
and Strong 1998, 1999; Ferrat and Vlahos 1998; Goodhue 1995, 1998; Goodhue and Thompson 1995;
Goodhue et al. 1997, 2000; Majchrzak, Malhotra and John 2005; Staples and Seddon 2004).
3In summary, we note that this stream of research corroborated the relevance of the TTF concept
in explaining and predicting IS success for individual performance. Since no systematic bias has been
identified regarding the relevance of TTF for different types of IS, we assume that TTF is a valid
construct to explain the success of mobile IS, yet we also take note of the need to include into the analysis
the particularities of mobile technology as compared to non-mobile technology, such as the individual use
context. The basic idea of TTF has been considered in mobile IS research studies (Gebauer and Shaw
2004, Junglas and Watson 2003, Liang and Wei 2004), but has not been integrated systematically. A
limiting aspect to our research objective is the fact tha

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