Prépa Sciences Po – Anglais – Fiche 2 : Prepositions + Quiz
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Prépa Sciences Po – Anglais – Fiche 2 : Prepositions + Quiz

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7 pages
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Professeur : Suzie Suriam FICHE II Prepositions A preposition describes a relationship between other words in a sentence. Consider the professor's desk and all the prepositional phrases we can use while talking about it. You can sit before the desk (or in front of the desk). The professor can sit on the desk (when he's being informal) or behind the desk, and then his feet are under the desk or beneath the desk. He can stand beside the desk (meaning next to the desk), before the desk, between the desk and you, or even on the desk (if he's really strange). If he's clumsy, he can bump into the desk or try to walk through the desk (and stuff would fall off the desk). Passing his hands over the desk or resting his elbows upon the desk, he often looks across the desk and speaks of the desk or concerning the desk as if there were nothing else like the desk. Because he thinks of nothing except the desk, sometimes you wonder about the desk, what's in the desk, what he paid for the desk, and if he could live without the desk. You can walk toward the desk, to the desk, around the desk, by the desk, and even past the desk while he sits at the desk or leans against the desk. All of this happens, of course, in time: during the class, before the class, until the class, throughout the class, after the class, etc. And the professor can sit there in a bad mood [another adverbial construction].

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Publié par
Publié le 10 septembre 2009
Nombre de lectures 51
Langue Français

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Professeur : Suzie Suriam
FICHE II
Prepositions
A preposition describes a relationship between other words in a sentence.
Consider the professor's desk and all the prepositional phrases we can use while talking about it.
You can sitbefore the desk (orin front ofdesk). The professor can sit the on the desk (when he's being informal) orbehinddesk, and then his feet are the underdesk or the beneathdesk. He can stand the beside the desk (meaningnext to the desk),before the desk,betweenthe desk and you, or evenonthe desk (if he's really strange). If he's clumsy, he can bumpintothe desk or try to walkthroughthe desk (and stuff would falloffthe desk). Passing his handsoverthe desk or resting his elbowsuponthe desk, he often looksacrossthe desk and speaksof the desk orconcerningdesk as if there were nothing else the like the desk. Because he thinks of nothingexceptthe desk, sometimes you wonderaboutthe desk, what'sinthe desk, what he paidforthe desk, and if he could livewithoutthe desk. You can walktowarddesk, the todesk, the arounddesk, the by the desk, and evenpastdesk the while he sitsatthe desk or leansagainstthe desk.
All of this happens, of course, in time:during the class,before the class,untilclass, the throughoutclass, the after the class, etc. And the professor can sit therein a bad mood[another adverbial construction].
LISTOF COMMONPREPOSITIONS
about above across after against around at before behind below beneath beside besides between beyond
by down during except for from in inside into like near of off
on out outside over since through throughout till to toward under up upon with without
according to because of by way of in addition to in front of in place of in regard to in spite of instead of on account of out of
We say we areatthe hospital to visit a friend who isinthe hospital. We lieinbed butonthe couch. We watch a filmatthe movies butontelevision.
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