RAJIV GANDHI INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY KOTTAYAM ...
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RAJIV GANDHI INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY KOTTAYAM ...

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RAJIV GANDHI INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY KOTTAYAM MANDATORY DISCLOSURE M Tech. Mechanical Engineering VELLOOR P.O., PAMPADY, KOTTAYAM – 686 501 Phone: (0481) 2506153, 2507763, 2506953, 2505963 Fax: (0481) 2506153 Website:
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Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Nombre de lectures 41















































Revised August 29, 2000

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY
LECTURE HALL DESIGN STANDARDS5
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18 Ceilings 3.2.3
18 Walls 3.2.2
18 Floors 3.2.1
18 Floors, Walls, and Ceilings 3.2
18 3.1
18 ARCHITECTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS 3.0
15 Foyers and Public Spaces Public Amenity 2.5
15 Physical Access and Movememt 2.4
11 Lectern, Stages, and Podia 2.3.4
11 Seating, Rake, and Visibility 2.3.3
Projection Screens 2.3.2
Writing Boards 2.3.1
Information Transfer and Display (Continued 2 3
General Lecture Halls 2.2
2.1
SPACE PLANNING AND LAYOUT 2.0
N INTRODUCTIO 1.0
SPECIFIC LECTURE HALL DESIGN GUIDELINES
UMBC's Design Standards 3.15
Sundry Issues 3.14
HVAC 3.13
Electrical and Lighting 3.12
Natural Lighting 3.11
Telecommunications 3.103.9
ise Control No 3.8
Accessibility 3.7
Writing Boards and Projection Screens 3.6
Orientation 3.5
Floor Walls, and Ceilings 3.4
Seating, Capacity, and Support Space 3.3
Entrances 3.2
Location 3.1
GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS 3.0
OVERVIE 2.0
INTRODUCTION 1.0
GENERAL LECTURE HALL DESIGN GUIDELINES
TABLE OF CONTENTS.
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SPECIFIC LECTURE HALL DESIGN GUIDELINES (Continued)
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33 Projectors Lifts for Video 4.6
33 Special AV Facilities 4.5
32 Advanced AV Facilities 4.4
32 Intermediate AV Facilities 4.3
31 Basic AV Facilities 4.2
31 AV Facility Development 4.1
31 AUDIO VISUAL & PRESENTATION FACILITIES 4.0
31 Works of Art 3.8.
30 Graphics and Signage (including signage for the disabled) 3.8.2
30 Clocks 3.8.1
30 Sundry Issues 3.8
30 Keylocks 3.7.5
30 Fire Protection Services 3.7.4
29 Aisle Lighting 3.7.3
29 Emergency Lighting and Exit Lighting .7.2
29 General 3.7.1
29 Safety and Security 3.7
29 Isolation 3.6.4
29 Ambient Noise 3.6.3
28 Reverberation 3.6.2
28 General 3.6.1
28 Acoustics 3.6
28 Fresh Air Supply 3.5.3
28 User Input to HVAC Controls 3.5.2
28 ements General Requir 3.5.1
28 Mechanical Services 3.5
27 Maintenance Issues 3.4.8
26 Specialist Lighting 3.4.7
26 Lighting Control 3.4.6
25 Lighting Planning 3.4.5
25 Specialist Power Requirements 3.4.4
25 al Power Distribution Outlets Gener 3.4.3
24 Power supply 3.4.2
24 Energy Management Issues 3.4.1
24 Electrical and Lighting Services 3.4
24 Soft Furnishings 3.3.5
23 Lectern Unit 3.3.4
20 Equipment Cupboards 3.3.3
19 Furniture General 3.3.2
19 g Surfaces Seating and Writin 3.3.1
19 Furniture and Fittings 3.3
18 ARCHITECTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS (Continued) 3.0
TABLE OF CONTENTS-


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SPECIFIC LECTURE HALL DESIGN GUIDELINES (Continued)
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22 Equipment Rack with Rear Access g. 10
21 Typical Rack Layout Lecture Theatre
17 Section View through a Theater
16 Plan of a Large Lecture Hall
14 Section View: Specific Example of a Large Lecture Hall
14 cific Example of a Large Lecture Hall Floor Plan: Spe
13 Section View: Specific Example of a Small Lecture Hall
12 Floor Plan: Specific Example of a Small Theater
10 Projection Screens, Simple Rules for Theatre Planning
LIST OF FIGURES
42 TYPE II (Advance Technology Video Origination) 6.2
37 TYPE I (Advance Technology Auditorium Classroom) 6.1
36 TECHNOLOBY CAPABILITIES
STANDARD DESCRIPTION OF LECTURE HALLS BASED ON 6.0
35 Videconferencing 5.3.2
34 ng Using Video Links Teachi 5.3.1
34 Video Teaching and Conferencing 5.3
34 Public Access 5.2
34 Facilities for the Disabled 5.1
34 SPECIAL PLANNING ISSUES 5.0
TABLE OF CONTENTS1
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University of Maryland, Baltimore County



INTRODUCTION

Special appreciation and acknowledgement is given to Mr. Victor Aulestia, Direc tor of Instructional
Technology for the time and effort he committed to develop the January 4, 2000 Lecture Hall Design


In addition, appreciation is extended to the following individuals including their respective staffs who
have provided valu



• Victor Aulestia, Instructional Technology

• Alicia Arkell Klei

• Eric Lampe, Academic Services
• Tony Moreira, Vice Provost, Academic Affairs
• Tom Mollen, Physical Plant



• Eliot Shimoff, Psychology
• Ray Soellner, Physical Plant

• Ray Soellner, Physical Plant
• Phil Sokolove, Biology

• Director, UCS
• Tom Taylor, Enrollment Management
• orge Vitak, Director, Communication Services

The organization of this document is based on providing two sections of information:


• Specific Lecture Hall Design Guidelines.

Design Guidelines and Specific Lecture Hall Design Guidelines respectively.

It should be further noted that excluding section and subsection titles, changes from the original


represented in bold type. standards are
sultant is required to comply with both the General Lecture Hall To assist in the design, the selected Con
General Lecture Hall Design Guidelines.
Ge
Jack Suess
Brooks Stephens, Computer Science/Engineering
Joe Shryock, Physical Plant
ental Systems Tom Rabenhorst, Geography and Environm
Nancy Quantock, Capital Planning
Dorothy Proctor, Capital Planning
Alan Kreizenbeck, Theatre
s, Associate Registrar
Jonathan Finkelstein, Associate Dean, Arts and Sciences
George Alinsod, Physical Plant
Design Guidelines.
able input and assistance or participated in the revision/refinement of the Lecture Hall
Guidelines.
1.0
Revised Draft, August 25. 2000
GENERAL LECTURE HALL DESIGN GUIDELINES2
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The University of Maryland, Baltimore County Lecture Hall Design Guidelines are intended to be used
These guide lines are meant to supplement UMBC’s Design Standards, which can be obtained
from the Office of Capital Planning. Any proposed design which deviates from these guidelines
must be reviewed and approved by the Office of Capital Planning.

Designing a space for teaching and learning requires careful planning and organization. It requires
close collaboration between the architect, mechanical engineer, electrical engineer, lighting designer,
visual specialist, and instructor. A well designed space is t he result of careful coordination of
information gathered from architectural and engineering disciplines as well as established instructional






The learning environment must be: located with in a building with easy access by students and
equipment, isolated from noisy gathering places, and concentrated on the lower floors of buildings to
provide an easy avenue for students, as well as provide convenient access for the disabled and support
They should not be adjacent to mailrooms, reception areas, dining facilities, rest rooms, bicycle parking,
loading docks, mechanical equipment rooms, and o ther similar noise producing areas. Care must be
taken in their location in relation to the exterior environments as well as to direct air paths between
rooms.

The design shall take into account the flow of students both i n
and out of the space and within the space as well as the need for the instructor to move around
in the front of the room.

class activities, is aff
building. In spaces planned for extensive media use, the configuration can be one of the most
significant factors contributing to the effectiveness of the display system, the student's comfort and
ability to interact with the instructor and other students, and the strength and clarity with which the


of vehicles which deliver and maintain audio visual equipment. Items which need to be considered are
ramps, level vehicle access points, and other provisions for the ease of movement of heavy or bulky
equipment.



The flow of stud ents should be the major factor in determining the location of entrances. Entrances
should be located to avoid student traffic passing through non instructional areas. In addition, large
numbers of students traveling in corridors and hallways can generate unwanted noise for still in use. In
determining the size of entrances and exits, building codes should not be the only criteria. The flow of
students in and out of rooms can have a major impact on size of entrances and exits. The design of
entrances, ex its, stairs, corridors, and exterior paths should take into account between class student
traffic. For example, it is not realistic to assume that a room will be completely vacant when students
begin arriving for the next class.

Provide vision panels in entrance doors. They could be tinted.


Entrances 3.2
nd parking For new facilities, consideration should be given during the site planning process for access a
instructor's voice is heard.
ected by factors of the room design, the shape as well as the its placement within a
The success with which a student receives information from an instructor or can effectively participate in
Physical Access and Movement
vices. The uses of adjacent spaces must be carefully chosen to avoid distracting noises and sounds. ser
Location 3.1
GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS 3.0
technology principles.
audio
as the criteria for the design and construction of new and renovated lecture halls on the UMBC Campus.
OVERVIEW 2.0-
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Provide door stops to protect the wall surface (specifically gypsum wall board).

Grills shall not be allowed in room entrance doors.

Seating,

The size of the room should be designed to a ccommodate the programmed number of occupants as
well as provide for additional support space. The support space must take into consideration both the
set up and use of audio visual equipment, access for the disabled, layout of the instructor's materials,
circulation space and empty floor space needed to keep students from being seated too close to a
chalkboard, projection screen, or video monitor.

In rooms with fixed theatre seating or tablet arm chairs, the seating should be secured to the
e of floor cleaning.

There shall be no columns in any teaching space.

Floor, Walls, and Ceilings

Carpeting shall be provided in all rooms unless discipline specific related courses dictate
otherwise.

Ceiling: If lay in ceilings are used, 2’ x 2’ tile s should be specified and the Consultant shall
comply with UMBC’s Design Standards for tile standards and style.

be easily maintained or changed (paint).

he ceiling height is another important consideration when designing the space. For example, because
a projection screen must be large enough to display images of adequate size, it must be placed high
enough from the floor to provide unobstructed sight lin es. This usually requires a ceiling height higher


Orientation

The orientation of a room's surfaces play a major role in how sound is reflected from the sending end of
a room to the rear of a room. Careful consideration must be given to the configuration of each wall
surface, ceiling plane, and floor finish. In rooms that require fixed seating or fixed tables, floors should
the students, angled upward from the sending end, to project the instructor's voice towards the rear of
the classroom or lecture hall.

Writing Boards and Projection Screens

Seating Selection of built in seating shall also take into accoun t durability and availability of


The number of left handed tablet arm chairs should total approximately 10% of the room


Visible seat numbers shall be incorporated into all fixed seating.

Writing Boards Whenever white boards are specified, secure storage for markers within the
room is required.

capacity.
spare parts.
3.6
ed toward be tiered to provide good sight lines. The ceiling section over the sending end should be inclin
3.5
than the standard eight feet.
Colors of finishes should be neutral on furniture and fixtures with accent color used where it can
3.4
riser for eas
Capacity, and Support Space 3.34

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Projection Screens Dual projection screens are required; location to be determined during
n
with the latter providing the capability to concurrently use the writing surface.

Accessibility

All rooms must be designed to comply with the Standards for Barrier Free Access, available from the
Office of Risk Management and Physical Plant.

tions for wheelchair users shall be marked to prevent them from being pushed aside or used
for stacking materials or otherwise be made unavailable for the intended user. In rooms with
regular seating when not in use by individuals using wheelchairs.



Other important factors must be considered in the design. To avoid the noise generated by their
operation and use, vending machines must be l ocated as far away as possible. Trash and recycling
containers should be located near the vending machines. Restrooms and drinking fountains should be
located nearby and should be designed to handle student use between classes, rather than minimum
code r equirements which are based solely on room occupant load. To prevent unwanted noise



to accommodate both wireless and wired connectivity.

All rooms to be pre wired to accommodate verbal interactive capability between the students
and the instructor. The methodology (hard wired or wireless to be dete rmined on a project


Telecommunications

AV Services, Campus Police, Physical Plant, and all campus phone numbers. The campus will
investigate the abil ity to use a light versus a bell to indicate incoming calls on these phones.

and equipment provided by the university. Coordinate telecommunication requirements with
UMBC’s Department of Communications Services. Reference UMBC’s Design Standards for
Pathway Specifications.

Regardless of the type of room, it is essential to provide the infrastructure connectivity for the
desired delivery system and this should i nclude: copper (either level 5, 6, or 7 depending on
what is current on campus), optical fiber (both single and multi mode), and coaxial. With media
in place, the need for flexibility is essential.

Regarding wireless capability, the design should allow for its placement providing hardwire to
deal with room configuration issues. In the near term, wherever there is laptop use, hardwire
connections should be provided.

Provide an active telephone jack in all rooms that is conveniently located to the technology
console.


the room with a transmitter(s) located in the room. It would be the Consultant’s responsibility to
The telecommunication systems shall consist of pathways and spaces which only house cabling
All rooms shall be provided with campus phone connectivity that will provide access to Phones
3.10
basis).
rovided with infrastructure capability For future flexibility/connectivity, all new rooms should be p
Data 3.9
transmission, restrooms should not share common walls, floors, or ceilings with instructional spaces.
Noise control 3.8
so stations may be used as fixed seating, accessible tables should be fixed with stackable chairs
Sta
3.7
design to allow faculty the capability to project the same image on both screens or on one scree-
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The pathway to just outside of each room should use cable trays. Conduits should then be used
for entering larger rooms. Within each room , there are 4 methods of providing service and they
are presented below in order of highest to lowest flexibility capability.
• Raised Floor
• Embedded channeling
• Hard conduit to specific locations
• Distribution to the walls

Natural Lighting

Natural li ghting is not desired in lecture halls.

Electrical and Lighting

Line voltage (120v) electric clocks (digital and centrally controlled at Physical Plant) should be
located in each Classroom and Lecture Hall.

Use Low Voltage Electrical System since i t provides more versatility/flexibility. This would also
allow the use of motion detectors (automatic lights on and off) in each room. In rooms that have
media control systems, the system should be programmed to automatically shut off the lights.

Fluore scent lighting voltage is 277. Lower light levels appropriate for projection in rooms is
in the seating area.

Lighting fixture diffusers should be specified since different diffusers will greatly change the
lighting pattern.

the front of t he room.

Incandescent light fixtures shall be dimmable and banked for lighting control.

RETROFIT of Spaces Split the switching of the tubes in the fixtures over the seating area. For
another switch. This will provide a low (1 tube), medium (2 tubes) and high (3 tubes) lighting


Lighting Planning When incorporating both incandescent and fluorescent, there is a need for
consistency regarding spect rum and lighting levels. All presets (including room technology)
should have a manual override.

Lighting Control Lighting controls should be conveniently located to the instructor station,
clearly labeled, and should provide instantaneous response when pressed. In addition, lighting
control should have a minimum of four options: full on, two projection settings (medium and
low), and full off.

Lighting: Dimmable directional tungsten filament downlights should be used in teaching spaces
in lieu of flu orescent dimming fixtures. Fluorescent tubes should be specified as 41k Kelvin.


level.
and the two outboard tubes on example, in a 3 tube fixture, put all the center tubes on one switch
All fluorescent fixtures shall be have parabolic lenses and placed parallel to the writing surface at
fixtures in the instructor area are switched separately from those
tube fluorescent fixtures. First, zone the lighting so that required and can be achieved with multi
3.12
3.11-
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In existing rooms, consideration should be given to installing ceiling fans to enhance proper air
circulation in the room.

HVAC Controls: Climate Control Temp erature and air flow as well as the associated acoustical
control of HVAC systems are critical to the room. There should be centrally monitored and
controlled (Physical Plant) HVAC systems in all instructional spaces.

Mechanical Services, General Require ments: A number of air changes should be specified
noise and therefore are not desirable since they create a disturbance to the class and are more
ce intensive. It is recommended that baseboard heating (fin tubes) be used in
classrooms below window areas.

Fresh Air Supply The space should conform to ASHRAE 1997 code standard or the most
currently acceptable edition.



Trash c ans are to be provided in all rooms.

Keylocks Although not in place, it is UMBC’s goal to use card keys in lieu of key locks on AV


Stainless steel in lieu of plastic switch and outlet plates
used.

Metal pencil sharpeners should be installed.


The selected Consultant shall comply with all requirements and services as set forth in UMBC’s
Design Standards. As it relates to instructional spaces specifically, the design consultant shall
comply/satisfy the criteria set forth below:
• Part I D, Codes
• Division 6, Wood and Plastics; E. Interior Architectural Woodwork
• Division 8, Doors and Windows, including Addenda

• Division 08710, Finish Hardware
• Division 08800, Glazing
• Division 9, Finishes
• Division 10, Specialties, D. Interior Signage
• Division 12, Furnishings
• Division 15, Mechanical
• Division 16, Electrical
• Division 17, Fire Protection E ngineering
• Part III, Request for Deviation from Design Standards.

Classroom Seating
Operators Division 08460, Automatic Door
UMBC’s Design Standards 3.15
and voice plates are to be as well as data
and electrical service and equipment access.
Sundry Issues 3.14
maintenan
based on the heating and cooling load of the space. In addition, fancoils in classrooms generate
HVAC 3.13