Social Science Research and Policymaking: Meta-Analysis and Paradox
49 pages
English

Social Science Research and Policymaking: Meta-Analysis and Paradox

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Description

  • cours - matière potentielle : homework
  • exposé
  • cours - matière potentielle : achievement
Steven I. Miller, Marcel Fredericks, Frank J. Perino1 Social Science Research and Policymaking: Meta-Analysis and Paradox Steven I. Miller, Marcel Fredericks, Frank J. Perino Abstract The purpose of this article is to explore some of the non-obvious characteristics of the social science research-social policy (SSRSP) paradigm. We examine some of the underlying as- sumptions of the readily accepted claim that social science research can lead to the creation of rational social policy.
  • meta-analysis
  • meta- analysis
  • conceptual analysis
  • meta- analyses
  • meta-analyses
  • such considerations
  • social science research
  • statistical methods
  • techniques
  • social policy
  • policy

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Informations

Publié par
Nombre de lectures 31
Langue English


School of Journalism,
Media and
Preston PR1 2HE
Communication
Tel 01772 894730
Fax 01772 892907
2011/2012 BA (Hons)
International
Journalism
Course Handbook








Megan Knight, Course Leader
University of Central Lancashire, Guangdong
University of Foreign Studies, Asian School of
Communication
All course materials, including lecture notes and other additional materials related to your course and
provided to you, whether electronically or in hard copy, as part of your study, are the property of (or
licensed to) UCLan and MUST not be distributed, sold, published, made available to others or copied
other than for your personal study use unless you have gained written permission to do so from the
Head of School. This applies to the materials in their entirety and to any part of the materials.
UCLan Mission statement

WE PROMOTE ACCESS TO EXCELLENCE ENABLING YOU TO DEVELOP YOUR
POTENTIAL
We value and practise equality of opportunity, transparency and tolerance.
We strive for excellence in all we do: locally regionally, nationally and internationally.
We work in partnership with business, the community and other educators.
We encourage and promote research innovation and creativity.
The Card
This represents a clear statement of the University’s intentions to deliver agreed standards for
a range of academic and administrative services. It spells out what is expected of you as a
student and the contribution that can be made to gain the most benefit from your time at
UCLan.

You will get the best out of your time at UCLan if you are committed to:
Preparing for classes and attending punctually
Completing your work to the best of your ability and submitting it on time
Not committing plagiarism
Keeping up to date with course information through UCLan email or other channels
Using the feedback you are given to improve subsequent work
Making appropriate use of teaching staff’s time
Taking responsibility for your personal development planning and skills development
Treating staff, fellow students and neighbours in the local community with respect at all
times

We aim to:
Start and end all classes on time
Give you one week’s notice of changes to your classes
Give you feedback on assessed work within 15 working days
Give you clear, legible and informative feedback on your work
Be available for timed appointments
Treat you with respect at all times
Support you in your preparation for the work place
Supporting Diversity at UCLan
UCLan recognises and values individual difference and has a public duty to promote equality
and remove discrimination in relation to race, gender, disability, religion or belief, sexual
orientation and age. During your time at UCLan we expect you to be able to
experience "an integrated community based on mutual respect and tolerance where all staff
and students can feel safe, valued and supported."
contribute to creating a positive environment where discriminatory practices and
discrimination no longer happen.

Please review the UCLan Equality and Diversity Policy for further information.
Table of Contents
1. Introduction to the course ............................................................................................................... 1
1.1 Welcome to the course ............ 1
1.2 Rationale, aims and learning outcomes of the course ............................................................. 2
1.3 Course Team ........................................................................................... 3
1.4 Personal Tutor ......................................................... 4
1.5 School office administration details ........................................................ 4
1.6 Communication ....................................................................................... 4
1.7 Induction information ............................................. 4
Structure of the course ............................................................................................................................ 5
1.8 Overall structure (Preston campus) ......................... 5
1.8.1 Elective modules ............................................................................................................. 6
1.8.2 Accreditation of Prior Learning ...................... 6
1.9 Modules available ................................................................................................................... 7
1.9.1 Core modules .................. 7
1.9.2 Optional modules ............................................................................................................ 9
1.9.3 Progression .................... 12
1.10 Study Time ............................................................................................................................ 13
1.10.1 Weekly timetable .......................................................................................................... 13
1.10.2 Expected hours of study 13
1.10.3 Attendance Requirements ............................................................................................. 13
1.11 Data Protection ...................................................... 13
2. Approaches to teaching and learning ............................................................................................ 15
2.1 Expertise of staff ................................................... 15
2.2 Learning and teaching methods ............................................................................................ 15
2.2.1 Lectures ......................................................... 17
2.2.2 Seminars ........................................................................................ 17
2.2.3 Workshops .................................................... 17
2.2.4 Tutorials ........................................................................................................................ 17
2.2.5 Time spent learning ....................................................................................................... 17
2.2.6 Help with learning ......... 18
2.2.7 Attendance .................................................................................................................... 18
2.3 Study skills ............................ 18
2.4 Learning resources ................................................................................................................ 18
2.4.1 Learning Information Services (LIS) ............ 18
2.4.2 Books ............................................................................................................................ 18
2.4.3 Journals, websites, etc ................................... 19
2.4.4 The Library ................................................................................................................... 19
2.5 Personal development planning ............................ 19
2.5.1 What is PDP? ................................................................................................................ 19
2.5.2 How will it help you? .... 20
2.5.3 What do you do? ........................................................................................................... 20
2.5.4 How will we help you? . 20
2.5.5 What will you gain from PDP? ..................................................................................... 20
2.6 Career opportunities .............................................. 21
3. Student support, guidance and conduct ......................................................................................... 21
3.1 Personal Tutors ..................................................... 21
3.2 Student Support ................................................................ 21
3.3 Students with disabilities ...................................................................................................... 22
3.4 Health and Safety .................. 22
3.5 Conduct ................................................................................................................................. 22
3.6 Students‟ Union .................... 22
4. Assessment .................................................................................................................................... 23
4.1 Assessment Strategy ............. 23
4.1.1 Marking ......................................................................................................................... 23
4.1.2 Assessment types .......................................................................................................... 24
4.2 Assessment arrangements for students with a disability ....................................................... 25
4.3 Notification of assignments and examination arrangements................. 25
4.4 Referencing ........................................................................................................................... 25
4.5 Dealing with difficulties in meeting assessment deadlines ................... 26
4.5.1 Extenuating circumstances ............................................................................................ 26
4.5.2 Late submissions ........................................................................................................... 27
4.6 Feedback Following Assessments ........................ 27
4.7 Cheating, plagiarism or collusion ......................................................................................... 27
4.8 Appeals against assessment board decisions......................................................................... 28
Course regulations ................................................................ 29
4.9 Course requirements ............................................................................. 29
4.10 Classification of Awards ....................................... 29
5. Student voice ................................................................................................. 29
5.1 Course representatives .......................................... 30
5.2 Student Staff Liaison Committee Meetings (SSLC) ............................................................. 30
5.3 Module Evaluation Questionnaires ....................................................... 31
5.4 Complaints ............................................................................................ 31
6. Appendices .................................................................... 32
6.1 Programme Specification ...................................... 32



1. Introduction to the course
1.1 Welcome to the course
Welcome to the School of Journalism, Media and Communication (JOMEC) at the University of
Central Lancashire. We hope you will enjoy, and benefit from, this exciting and challenging
programme of studies in the field of International Journalism.
In recent years advances in technology and the spread of global business has led to a world that
appears to be shrinking in size. No longer can we live in countries and pretend we are immune from
decisions and events happening elsewhere in the world.
Journalism is both observer of these activities and part of the global processes. Improved transport
links and communication technologies mean that journalists can quickly reach any area of the world
and report directly from the scene. But journalism is also an industry. Companies once confined
within national boundaries now operate across borders, within other nations and, in some cases, on a
near global scale.
These associated trends, of world-shrinking communications and the spread of corporate reach, are
central themes in the study of international journalism. This programme is dedicated to ensuring that
you know about them – and, more importantly, that through reflection, analysis and evaluation, you
understand the consequences and implications of changes.
Your learning starts with this handbook. You are setting out into unknown territory and this is the
map that will guide your progress. It is a journey with many twists and turns and, probably, some
unexpected difficulties. Thorough study of the handbook will ensure that you have a clear picture of
where you are going and where you are at any particular time.
You will see that as the course progresses there are opportunities for you to pursue options and other
avenues that enable to direct your route in directions that best suit your needs. We hope you will take
full advantage of these to enhance and extend your learning and opportunities for the future.
Megan Knight (course leader)
and the course team
maknight@uclan.ac.uk

BA Hons International Journalism 2011-12 1 1.2 Rationale, aims and learning outcomes of the course
BA (Hons) International Journalism is a fairly new course but it is offered by a journalism department
that is one of the oldest and largest in the UK. Over the last 50 years we have educated thousands of
journalists who now work, in often senior positions, in news organisations in the UK and across the
globe in the world.
The course has been designed to meet the needs of students who wish to learn both practical and study
skills that relate to three aspects of international journalism – news activities in a range of different
countries, the operation of journalism within multi-national businesses and the reporting of
international events and issues.
It is intended to enable students to find employment and develop as journalists in a range of work
environments. These include the international news media and agencies as well as journalism and
other media work in a variety of national settings. For those students who do not wish to pursue a
career in journalism, the course provides them with knowledge of the important roles of the news
industries in social life and advanced communication skills that will enhance their career prospects or
equip them for further study.
We would emphasise that this course is intended to produce „life-long learners‟. That is, graduates
who can think about journalism as well as do journalism. This is the reason that the course insists that
you reflect on the processes that underpin journalism practice and analyse them to learn more about
their social consequences.
It is these skills of „learning how to learn‟, that will help you develop and progress in your lives and
careers. And, as a thinking journalist, we hope that you will make a contribution to the enhancement
of journalism standards that support rational public debate and help maintain and build better and
fairer societies.
One of the most exciting aspects of this course is the multi-national and multi-cultural backgrounds of
the students. We want you to contribute your experiences and reflection on journalism in a variety of
international settings.
These shared experiences will often form the foundations for discussions and explorations of
the processes and factors that influence journalism and journalists.

BA Hons International Journalism 2011-12 2 1.3 Course Team
Megan Knight is the course leader of the programme at the main campus in Preston, and has overall
responsibility for the course on all three campuses. The staff listed below teach on various modules
across the course, but you may also be taught by staff from elsewhere in the school and across the
division. A full list of staff in the journalism division can be found at:
http://www.uclan.ac.uk/schools/journalism_media_communication/journalism/staff.php
Megan Knight, Course Leader
+44 (0)1772 874513
maknight@uclan.ac.uk

Robert Beers
+44 (0)1772 874754
rsbeers@uclan.ac.uk

Amy Binns
+44 (0)1772 895694
abinns@uclan.ac.uk

Clare Cook
+44 (0)1772 894737
cecook@uclan.ac.uk

Caroline Hawtin
+44 (0)1772 895692
chawtin@uclan.ac.uk

Julie Freer
+44 (0)1772 894750
jefreer@uclan.ac.uk

George Ogola
+44 (0)1772 894829
googola@uclan.ac.uk

BA Hons International Journalism 2011-12 3