The Cook

The Cook's Oracle; and Housekeeper's Manual

-

Documents
792 pages
Lire
Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres

Description

The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Cook's Oracle; and Housekeeper's Manual, by William KitchinerThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: The Cook's Oracle; and Housekeeper's ManualAuthor: William KitchinerRelease Date: May 4, 2009 [EBook #28681]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE COOK'S ORACLE ***Produced by Julia Miller and the Online DistributedProofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This file wasproduced from images generously made available by TheInternet Archive/American Libraries.)Transcriber’s NoteObvious typographical errors have been corrected. A list of these changes is found at the end of the text.Inconsistencies in spelling and hyphenation have been maintained. A list of inconsistently spelled and hyphenatedwords is found at the end of the text.Harper’s Stereotype Edition.THECOOK’S ORACLE;ANDHOUSEKEEPER’S MANUAL.CONTAININGReceipts for Cookery,ANDDIRECTIONS FOR CARVING.ALSO,THE ART OF COMPOSING THE MOST SIMPLE AND MOST HIGHLY FINISHEDBROTHS, GRAVIES, SOUPS, SAUCES, STORE SAUCES, AND FLAVOURINGESSENCES; PASTRY, PRESERVES, PUDDINGS, PICKLES, &c.WITHA COMPLETE SYSTEM OF COOKERYFOR CATHOLIC FAMILIES.THE QUANTITY OF EACH ARTICLE IS ACCURATELY STATED BY WEIGHT ANDMEASURE; BEING THE RESULT OF ...

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Ajouté le 08 décembre 2010
Nombre de lectures 24
Langue English
Signaler un problème

The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Cook's Oracle;
and Housekeeper's Manual, by
William Kitchiner
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no
cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,
give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg
License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: The Cook's Oracle; and Housekeeper's Manual
Author: William Kitchiner
Release Date: May 4, 2009 [EBook #28681]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK
THE COOK'S ORACLE ***
Produced by Julia Miller and the Online Distributed
Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This file
was
produced from images generously made available byproduced from images generously made available by
The
Internet Archive/American Libraries.)
Transcriber’s Note
Obvious typographical errors have been corrected. A
list of these changes is found at the end of the text.
Inconsistencies in spelling and hyphenation have been
maintained. A list of inconsistently spelled and
hyphenated words is found at the end of the text.
Harper’s Stereotype Edition.
THE
COOK’S ORACLE;
AND
HOUSEKEEPER’S
MANUAL.
CONTAINING
Receipts for Cookery,AND
DIRECTIONS FOR CARVING.
ALSO,
THE ART OF COMPOSING THE MOST SIMPLE AND
MOST HIGHLY FINISHED
BROTHS, GRAVIES, SOUPS, SAUCES, STORE
SAUCES, AND FLAVOURING
ESSENCES; PASTRY, PRESERVES, PUDDINGS,
PICKLES, &c.
WITH
A COMPLETE SYSTEM OF COOKERY
FOR CATHOLIC FAMILIES.
THE QUANTITY OF EACH ARTICLE IS
ACCURATELY STATED BY WEIGHT AND
MEASURE; BEING THE RESULT OF ACTUAL
EXPERIMENTS
INSTITUTED IN THE KITCHEN OF
WILLIAM KITCHINER, M.D.
ADAPTED TO THE AMERICAN PUBLIC
BY A MEDICAL GENTLEMAN.
FROM THE LAST LONDON EDITION.
New-York:
PRINTED BY J. & J. HARPER, 82 CLIFF-ST.
SOLD BY COLLINS AND HANNAY, COLLINS ANDCO., G. AND C. AND H. CARVILL,
WILLIAM B. GILLEY, E. BLISS, O. A. ROORBACH,
WHITE, GALLAHER, AND WHITE,
C. S. FRANCIS, WILLIAM BURGESS, JR., AND N. B.
HOLMES;—PHILADELPHIA,
E. L. CAREY AND A. HART, AND JOHN GRIGG;—
ALBANY, O. STEELE, AND W. C. LITTLE.
1830.
SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW-YORK, ss.
BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the 20th day of
November, A. D. 1829, in the fifty-fourth year of the
independence of the United States of America, J. & J.
HARPER, of the said district, have deposited in this
office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim
as Proprietors, in the words following, to wit:
“The Cook’s Oracle, and Housekeeper’s Manual,
Containing Receipts for Cookery, and Directions for
Carving; also the Art of Composing the most simple
and most highly finished Broths, Gravies, Soups,
Sauces, Store Sauces, and Flavouring Essences;
Pastry, Preserves, Puddings, Pickles, &c. With a
Complete System of Cookery for Catholic Families.
The Quantity of each Article is accurately stated by
Weight and Measure; being the Result of Actual
Experiments instituted in the Kitchen of William
Kitchiner, M.D. Adapted to the American Public by a
Medical Gentleman.”
In conformity to the Act of Congress of the UnitedStates, entitled “An Act for the encouragement of
Learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and
books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies,
during the time therein mentioned.” And also to an
Act, entitled “An Act, supplementary to an Act, entitled
an Act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing
the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors
and proprietors of such copies, during the times
therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof
to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching
historical and other prints.”
FREDERICK I. BETTS,
Clerk of the Southern District of New-York.
ADVERTISEMENT.
The publishers have now the pleasure of presenting to
the American public, Dr. Kitchiner’s justly celebrated
work, entitled “The Cook’s Oracle, and Housekeeper’s
Manual,” with numerous and valuable improvements,
by a medical gentleman of this city.
The work contains a store of valuable information,
which, it is confidently believed, will not only prove
highly advantageous to young and inexperienced
housekeepers, but also to more experienced matrons
—to all, indeed, who are desirous of enjoying, in the
highest degree, the good things which Nature has so
abundantly bestowed upon us.
The “Cook’s Oracle” has been adjudged, byconnoisseurs in this country and in Great Britain, to
contain the best possible instructions on the subject of
serving up, beautifully and economically, the
productions of the water, land, and air, in such a
manner as to render them most pleasant to the eye,
and agreeable to the palate.
Numerous notices, in commendation of the work,
might be selected from respectable European journals;
but the mere fact, that within twelve years, seventy
thousand copies of it have been purchased by the
English public, is sufficient evidence of its reception
and merits.
New-York, December, 1829.
PREFACE
TO
THE SEVENTH EDITION.
The whole of this Work has, a seventh time, been
carefully revised; but this last time I have found little to
add, and little to alter.
I have bestowed as much attention on each of the 500
receipts as if the whole merit of the book was to be
estimated entirely by the accuracy of my detail of one
particular process.
The increasing demand for “The Cook’s Oracle,”
amounting in 1824 to the extraordinary number ofupwards of 45,000, has been stimulus enough to
excite any man to submit to the most unremitting
study; and the Editor has felt it as an imperative duty
to exert himself to the utmost to render “The Cook’s
Oracle” a faithful narrative of all that is known of the
various subjects it professes to treat.
PREFACE.
Among the multitudes of causes which concur to
impair health and produce disease, the most general
is the improper quality of our food: this most frequently
arises from the injudicious manner in which it is
prepared: yet strange, “passing strange,” this is the
only one for which a remedy has not been sought; few
persons bestow half so much attention on the
preservation of their own health, as they daily devote
to that of their dogs and horses.
The observations of the Guardians of Health
respecting regimen, &c. have formed no more than a
catalogue of those articles of food, which they have
considered most proper for particular constitutions.
Some medical writers have, “in good set terms,”
warned us against the pernicious effects of improper
diet; but not one has been so kind as to take the
trouble to direct us how to prepare food properly;
excepting only the contributions of Count Rumford,
who says, in pages 16 and 70 of his tenth Essay,
“however low and vulgar this subject has hitherto
generally been thought to be—in what Art or Sciencecould improvements be made that would more
powerfully contribute to increase the comforts and
enjoyments of mankind? Would to God! that I could fix
the public attention to this subject!”
The Editor has endeavoured to write the following
receipts so plainly, that they may be as easily
understood in the kitchen as he trusts they will be
relished in the dining-room; and has been more
ambitious to present to the Public a Work which will
contribute to the daily comfort of all, than to seem
elaborately scientific.
The practical part of the philosophy of the kitchen is
certainly not the most agreeable; gastrology has to
contend with its full share of those great impediments
to all great improvements in scientific pursuits; the
prejudices of the ignorant, and the misrepresentations
of the envious.
The sagacity to comprehend and estimate the
importance of any uncontemplated improvement, is
confined to the very few on whom nature has
bestowed a sufficient degree of perfection of the
sense which is to measure it;—the candour to make a
fair report of it, is still more uncommon; and the
kindness to encourage it cannot often be expected
from those whose most vital interest it is to prevent
the developement of that by which their own
importance, perhaps their only means of existence,
may be for ever eclipsed: so, as Pope says, how
many are
“Condemn’d in business or in arts to drudge,Without a rival, or without a judge:
All fear, none aid you, and few understand.”
Improvements in Agriculture and the Breed of Cattle
have been encouraged by premiums. Those who have
obtained them, have been hailed as benefactors to
society! but the Art of making use of these means of
ameliorating Life and supporting a healthful
Existence—Cookery—has been neglected!!
While the cultivators of the raw materials are
distinguished and rewarded, the attempt to improve
the processes, without which neither vegetable nor
animal substances are fit for the food of man
(astonishing to say), has been ridiculed, as unworthy
the attention of a rational being!!
The most usefulvii-* art—which the Editor has chosen
to endeavour to illustrate, because nobody else has,
and because he knew not how he could employ some
leisure hours more beneficially for mankind, than to
teach them to combine the “utile” with the “dulce,” and
to increase their pleasures, without impairing their
health, or impoverishing their fortune, has been for
many years his favourite employment; and “The Art of
Invigorating and Prolonging Life by Food, &c. &c.” and
this Work, have insensibly become repositories for
whatever observations he has made which he thought
would make us “Live Happy, and Live Long!!!”
The Editor has considered the Art of Cookery, not
merely as a mechanical operation, fit only for working
cooks, but as the Analeptic part of the Art of Physic.
“How best the fickle fabric to support