The Englishman and Other Poems

The Englishman and Other Poems

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The Englishman and Other Poems, by Ella Wheeler Wilcox
The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Englishman and Other Poems by Ella Wheeler Wilcox (#8 in our series by Ella Wheeler Wilcox) Copyright laws are changing all over the world. Be sure to check the copyright laws for your country before downloading or redistributing this or any other Project Gutenberg eBook. This header should be the first thing seen when viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not remove it. Do not change or edit the header without written permission. Please read the "legal small print," and other information about the eBook and Project Gutenberg at the bottom of this file. Included is important information about your specific rights and restrictions in how the file may be used. You can also find out about how to make a donation to Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.
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Title: The Englishman and Other Poems Author: Ella Wheeler Wilcox Release Date: July, 2004 [EBook #6025] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first posted on October 20, 2002] Edition: 10 Language: English Character set encoding: ASCII
Transcribed from he 1912 Gay and Hancock edition by David Price, email ccx074@coventry.ac.uk
THE ENGLISHMAN AND OTHER POEMS
Contents: Preface - the Queen’s last ...

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The Englishman and Other Poems, by Ella Wheeler Wilcox

The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Englishman and Other Poems
by Ella Wheeler Wilcox
(#8 in our series by Ella Wheeler Wilcox)
Copyright laws are changing all over the world. Be sure to check the
copyright laws for your country before downloading or redistributing
this or any other Project Gutenberg eBook.
This header should be the first thing seen when viewing this Project
Gutenberg file. Please do not remove it. Do not change or edit the
header without written permission.
Please read the "legal small print," and other information about the
eBook and Project Gutenberg at the bottom of this file. Included is
important information about your specific rights and restrictions in
how the file may be used. You can also find out about how to make a
donation to Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.

**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts**
**eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971**
*****These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers!*****

Title: The Englishman and Other Poems
Author: Ella Wheeler Wilcox
Release Date: July, 2004 [EBook #6025]
[Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule]
[This file was first posted on October 20, 2002]
Edition: 10
Language: English
Character set encoding: ASCII

Transcribed from he 1912 Gay and Hancock edition by David Price, email
ccx074@coventry.ac.uk

THE ENGLISHMAN AND OTHER POEMS

Contents:

Preface - the Queen’s last ride
The Englishman
Canada
The Call
Coronation Poem and Prayer

Two Voices
A Ballade of the Unborn Dead
The Truth Teller
Just You
Reflection
Songs of Love and the Sea
Acquaintance
In India’s Dreamy Land
Rangoon
Thoughts on leaving Japan
On seeing the Diabutsu - at Kamakura, Japan
The Little Lady of the Bullock Cart
East and West
The Squanderer
Compensations
Song of the Rail
Always at Sea
The Suitors
The Jealous Gods
God Rules Alway
The Cure
The Forecast
Little Girls
Science
The Earth
The Muse and the Poet
The Spinster
Brotherhood
The Tavern of Last Times
The Two Ages
If I Were
Warned
Forward
In England
amraKThe Gossips
Together
Petition
A Waft of Perfume
The Plough
Go Plant a Tree
Pain’s Purpose
Memory’s Mansion
Old Rhythm and Rhyme
All in a Coach and Four
Songs of a Country Home
Worthy the name of “Sir Knight”

PREFACE - THE QUEEN’S LAST RIDE

(Written on the day of Queen Victoria’s funeral)

The Queen is taking a drive to-day,
They have hung with purple the carriage-way,
TWhheeyr eh tahvee Qdrueesesne dg oweitsh f oprutrhp laen tdh ne ervoeyra lc toramceks back.

Let no man labour as she goes by
On her last appearance to mortal eye;
With heads uncovered let all men wait
For the Queen to pass in her regal state.
Army and Navy shall lead the way
For that wonderful coach of the Queen’s to-day.

SKihnaglls r iadned bPerihinncde sh earn, da Lhourdmsb loef tbhaen lda;nd
And over the city and over the world
Shall the Flags of all Nations be half-mast-furled,
For the silent lady of royal birth
RWihdion igs ariwdianyg f raowma tyh fer owmo trlhde’ sC uonurretss tof earth,
To a mystical goal, on a secret quest.

Though in royal splendour she drives through town,
Her robes are simple, she wears no crown:
And yet she wears one, for widowed no more,
She is crowned with the love that has gone before,
And crowned with the love she has left behind
In the hidden depths of each mourner’s mind.

TBhoew Qlouwe eyno iunr shieleandcs e- ilisf t dyriovuirn gh ebayr!ts on high -

THE ENGLISHMAN

B oSron mine tohfe uflse hsah,r baonudr bsrtielld in the bone,
A TNhee wS pWiroitr ldo f pBriudnek: earn Hd ilwl.e flaunt or hide
We claim our place, as a separate race,
Or a self-created clan;
T i‘llW the earree ckoinm eofs tah ed aEyn gwlihsehnm waen .l’ike to say,

For under the front that seems so cold,
W Ae nadr et hcee rvtoaiicne t oth fiant ids, aw boingt, tbor sotaodr mm,ind
A nAdn dh ea chaerrairet st hhaits i sw sooefst iann ad lworadrlmy .way,
As only the great souls can:
A nWde i t armea kkiens ouf st hgel aEdn wglhisehn mina tnr.’uth we say,

H Ief shlea tmhisn hkiss tdhoe owr ionrl tdh teo foa cbeo lodf. the world,
H Te ow tilhl ee pvoeonr ,c uarnsde ;t hbeu ts ihcek ,o apnedn tsh hei so lpdu.rse
H eA insd ssllooww i tno gpivuit nugp t oh ewr ofamna;n the vote,
B uAt nhde dgiievse -s l ihkeer aron oEmn ignli tshhem haonu.r of doom,

CANADA

LEonogkl aonnd ,y foautrh estr aalnwda rtm soothne.r in one,
Sturdy and strong, with the valour of youth,
Where is another so lusty?
Coated and mailed, with the armour of truth,
Where is another so trusty?
Flesh of your flesh, and bone of your bone,
He is yours alone.

ESeneg ltahned ,w featahltehr oaf nydo umr osthoen.r in one,
FWohreesatts-f iperlidms egvoalld, eann da nvidr gsipnlael nsdoidd:,
Riches of nature and opulent God
For the use of his children intended.
A courage that dares, and a hope that endures,
And a soul all yours.

EHnegalra tnhde, cfrayt hoefr yaonudr smoont.her in one,
Little cares he for the glories of earth
Lying around and above him,
YAenadr tnhien gh iesa rht eo ff ohri tsh em roitghhetrs t oo fl ohivse bhiirtmh.,
Vast are your gifts to him, ample his store,
Now open your door.

EHnegelda tnhde, fvaotihceer oafn ydo muro sthoenr. in one,
LPerto fhfierm hsiitm npelaarc, ea innd yaottuer ncdo uynocui.ls of state:
SPtoronndge ri sh ihsi sw aorrdms t ion dtehfee nhdo uyro ouf. debate,
Flesh of your flesh, and bone of your bone,
Give him his own.

THE CALL

In the banquet hall of Progress
God has bidden to a feast
All the women in the East.

S oWmee mhuasvte wsaaiit da ‘nWoteh aerr ed naoy.t’ ready, -
S ‘oLmored, , wwiteh hveoiacr,e as nclde ware aonbde syt.’eady,

Others, timid and uncertain,
M aStneyp h fiodreth b treehimnbdl itnhge icnu trhtaei lnight,
With their faces hid from sight.

In the banquet hall of Progress
All must gather soon or late,
And the patient Host will wait.

I f Itfo i-nd aglya, dorn ief stso,- omro irnr owwo,e,
I f wAlilt hm pulseta asnusrew, eor,r awlilt hm suostr rgoow.,
They must go with unveiled faces,
F oCrl tohthe eHdo isnt vhiratsu es eat nthd eiinr pplriadcee.s,
And He will not he denied.

CORONATION POEM AND PRAYER

The world has crowned a thousand kings:
But destiny has kept
H eTro woeffiegrh tEiensgtl ahnodu’rs osf okni.ngly power
The rising bell of Progress rings;
L i kAen dp rTorpuhthest s wshtriacnh gloe,n pg rheadivceti snlge pcth,ange,
Before Time’s chariot run.

T hOel dg rEenagtleasnt dE pmrpoiured loyf stthaen dEsa.rth.
L ikRee aacrthe rioeust fhroerm Csoelao ntioe ssea.
S hHee rc lgaaszpes tahlle rwacorelsd icno hmerm gainrtdhs;;
A nTdh efa rB raitnisdh wFildaeg wflhoeatrse fsrtereo.ng ships ride,

O hT,h neierv reor usnind coef tChoe sstmaircs l abwe,gan

And souls evolved in ways unsolved,
And kingdoms reached their prime
Has Destiny held out to Man
A gift so full of awe,
As England’s crown which she hands down
In this stupendous time.

T hTirsi eiss aM cornuacricalh sh oaus r,b yw fhireen. Fate
A llM reunl esrtsa rmvue sot nb eb rmeaorde a tlhoanne .just -
Old England’s sense of
right
is great:
But now let her aspire
To feel more love, and build thereof
An everlasting Throne.

T hIse adsrkeiangm i‘nwgh eEna’s ta, nadw ‘awkhey ’a;t last,
W Naiot rn iont ttoooo sltoenrgn na ovr oaicnes.wer wrong,
L eAt nEdn wglitahn dh eprr owfiits eb yr ehpelry past,
R oTuo sheo hpeea, ratsn, d wtiot hrienj ohicere .foster kin

True wealth dwells not in things we own,
But in our
use
of things.
W Mhou swt cooulndq cuoerm fimrsat nitds ah ecaornt.quered land
S uAcnhd mpiogwhte ra us nMdraena hmaes dn beyv ekri nkgnso,wn,
And boundless strength would come at length
To one who used that art.

For now has dawned the People’s day:
A day of great unrest.
N oOrf tkiimnge naonrd csrepeacd ec taon gsrtiollw .man’s need
A llF loar nthdiss metuesrtn salh aqpuee sat ;wider way,
A nWdh Leeries uwroer ky-iewlodr na flearegt emr afiye lgdo.

T hWei tUh ncihvaernsgee iss i amll mai-ntherniltl.
T hHeo lWdso rflrde ien t fhaei tLh,e awidtehr ’bsa ptleadc ber.eath,
A nAdt ownies ew iist hh Tei wmhe’oss ien theenat,rt and will
S hTaol l
m
o
o
p
t
e
h
n
e

r
w
s
iodfe t hdeo roarsc leo.ng denied

On this round globe, oh, when and where
Were fitter time and scene
For Woman’s soul to reach its goal
Than
now
in England’s realm.
Was not the crown its King will wear

Made glorious by its Queen?
And who steered straight its ship of State?
Victoria at the Helm
!

K iBnyg fsa hvaovuer abnede nb yk ifnogrcs eb,y accident,
B uAt nridg Eht mopf irbierst hr iacnh da nmdo rbarlo wadorth,
F oLri kEen rgilvaenrsd ’os nK oinnge tcoo-durasye .are blent
B uDt,o awhn! ftrhoem li tghhet fTalhlrso sneea orfc hGinogd .white

Lord of the Earth and heavenly-spheres,
Creator of all things,
T hGoivu e wshtroe nhgatsht twor oEungghlta ngrde’sa ts wono.rlds from naught,
G iTvhe act ocuormage et ot oe dviesnp ekli nthgos,se fears
And for his creed give Love’s full mead;
Amen. Thy Will be done.

TWO VOICES

VIRTUE

OD owwann tfroon mo tnhee, pOa twhisc koef dp uornitey,, htoo ww awlka tsh iet tshtraet eytosu o cf ashmae,me?
FAlnudn gw bhreoraefdocrae stw faosr tthhea tf epreet coifo umse nw teoa tlrtha, mGpoled igna tvhee tdo uysot?u in trust,

ECIV

O prudent one, O spotless one, now listen well to me.
The ways that led to where I tread these paths of sin, were three:
And God, and good folks, all combined to make them fair to see.

VIRTUE

O wicked one, blasphemous one, now how could that thing be?

IVEC

IT fhelet ftihrset swtirarsi nNg aitnu rme’ys blloovoedl,y wrohaicdh, wpehremreeoant ems yt hlief e wworalsd .hurled.
IIt thwriallse ydo liukneg wpiallsoswiosn i inn t hmey svperiinnsg,, bwuht ehno swa pw abse Ig itno sk tnoo flwo?w,

AThned shiedceo nfrdo mw aesa tgheer , sciluerinot ruos amd,i nwdhs,e rthe em troudthe stth emyo tohuegrsh t dtow teelll,l.
TWhitaht smoinsng aamned dd raonacde cina lilgend o‘Irnannocce eI nwcael’ ksehdo tuhladt broeaard tahne ds ifgelnl .‘to Hell.’

VIRTUE

O fallen one, unhappy one, but why not rise and go
Back to the ways you left behind, and leave your sins below,
Nor linger in this sink of sin, since now you see, and know.

ECIV

The third road was the fair high way, trod by the good and great.
I cried aloud to that vast crowd, and told my hapless fate.
They hurried all through door and wall and shut Convention’s gate.
I beat it with my bleeding hands: they must have heard me knock.
They must have heard wild sob and word, yet no one turned the lock.

AOnh,d its iese vtehrey gdoeosdol faotlek, so flno Vcikritnuge ’bs yp, awtiht htoh osltdainndg, look and hand.

IA lnefdt tshoa tw hitihg hhwunayg ryw hheenacrte a ynodu scoaulm, ea, nadn wd esaoruyg bhrt atihne asnindf fuel estt,reet.

OG op,r tuedlle tnhte omn eo,f tOh es prootaldess sI coanem, e;w thheen r ogaodo dw faolykss f asipr,e aank do tf hmreee,.

A BALLADE OF THE UNBORN DEAD

They walked the valley of the dead;
Lit by a weird half light;
No sound they made, no word they said;
And they were pale with fright.
Then suddenly from unseen places came
Loud laughter, that was like a whip of flame.

They looked, and saw, beyond, above,
A land where wronged souls wait;
(Those spirits called to earth by love,
And driven back by hate).
And each one stood in anguish dumb and wild,
As she beheld the phantom of her child.

Yea, saw the soul her wish had hurled
Out into night and death;
Before it reached the Mother world,
Or drew its natal breath.
And terrified, each hid her face and fled
Beyond the presence of her unborn dead.

And God’s Great Angel, who provides
Souls for our mortal land,
Laughed, with the laughter that derides,
At that fast fleeing band
Of self-made barren women of the earth.

(Hell has no curse that withers like such mirth.)

‘O Angel, tell us who were they,
That down below us fared;
Those shapes with faces strained and grey,
And eyes that stared and stared;
Something there was about them, gave us fear;
Yet are we lonely, now they are not here.’

Thus spake the spectral children; thus
The Angel made reply:
‘They have no part or share with us;
They were but passers-by.’
‘But may we pray for them?’ the phantoms plead.
‘Yea, for they need your prayers,’ the Angel said.

They went upon their lonely way;
(Far, far from Paradise);
Their path was lit with one wan ray
From ghostly children’s eyes;
The little children who were never born;
And as they passed, the Angel laughed in scorn.

THE TRUTH TELLER

T hAen dT rsuhtho wTse lluesr tlihftes ptheeo pcluer’tsa ipnli,ght;
And everything seems uncertain,
Y eAt nodu tn ooft htihneg balta calkl nleososk sg rriogphitn.g,
My heart finds a world in bloom;
F oAr nitd sito cmaenhnoowt liisv ef aisn htihoen egldo foomr .hoping,

H Te htealtl sr aucse firso mw abrroirndge rw tiot hb roarcdee;r,
With riot and mad disorder,
A nTdh ey eet aerrthe itsh ea swurne tics hseedtt ipnlgace;
F oI ra mm yt hhienakirtn hg aosf ap ewaacye ,o nf foot rsgtreitftei;ng
All things save the joy of life.

I hTehaartd eianr tmh yw Yaos uat hr’es gbioeng ionfn iwnoge,
A nTdh ter oTurublthe , Taenllde rs toorlrdo wm, ea nsod. sinning:
I knew it was true, and tragic;
A nAdn tdh Ie nm, obuyr nseodm oev ceur rimouucsh mthaagti cw,as wrong;
The heart of me burst into song.

The years have been going, going,
B uAt tmhiex tTurruet ho f Tpellelears’su rbe oaonkds paraien s;howing
That evil is on the gain.
A nAdn Id kI nsohwo utlhda tb Ie o tuogo hst atod tboe sgirnige;ving,
B uTth saot lmifee hiso wa Ig lkoerieopu os nt hbienlgi.eving

JUST YOU

All the selfish joys of earth,
I am getting through.
That which used to lure and lead
Now I pass and give no heed;
Only one thing seems of worth -
Just you.

Not for me the lonely height,
And the larger view;
Lowlier ways seem fair and wide,
While we wander side by side.
One thing makes the whole world bright -
Just you.

Not for distant goals I run,
No great aim pursue;
Most of earth’s ambitions seem
Like the shadow of a dream.
All the world to me means one -
Just you.

REFLECTION

T wOinccee h wavhee nI stheee nw aGiloidn’gs fouf lla rcehfliledc taetd b igrrtahce.
T hParto lcoloaik msehdo naen ootnh,e ar nsdo utlh rhoaudg ch othmee tmoo tehaertr’hs, face.

And once when silence, absolute and vast,
SFouldlodwene du tphoen ftihnea l cionudrnatewnna nmcoer toafl dbreeaatthh,
That supreme glory of God’s grace was cast.