Zeppelin - The Story of a Great Achievement
119 pages
English

Zeppelin - The Story of a Great Achievement

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119 pages
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Zeppelin, by Harry VisseringThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: ZeppelinThe Story of a Great AchievementAuthor: Harry VisseringRelease Date: May 28, 2010 [EBook #32570]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK ZEPPELIN ***Produced by Irma Spehar and the Online DistributedProofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This file wasproduced from images generously made available by TheInternet Archive/American Libraries.)All the images are linked to the better-quality ones. To see them, please click on the image.Count ZeppelinCOUNT ZEPPELIN1838-1917]ZeppelinThe Story of a Great AchievementFor the great vision and unfaltering devotion to an idea that gave the rigid airship to the world, thiscompilation is my humble tribute to the memory of Count Zeppelin.Harry VisseringChicago, August,1922 Copyright 1922 byHarry VisseringAll rights reserved including that oftranslation into foreign languages.“The forces of nature cannot be eliminated but theymay be balanced one against the other.”Count Zeppelin,Friedrichshafen, May 1914.HE savage can fasten only a dozen pounds on his back and swim the river. When he makes an axe, fells a tree, and builds araft, he can carry many times a dozen pounds. As ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Zeppelin, by HarryVisseringThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at nocost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project GutenbergLicense includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: ZeppelinThe Story of a Great AchievementAuthor: Harry VisseringRelease Date: May 28, 2010 [EBook #32570]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOKZEPPELIN ***Produced by Irma Spehar and the Online DistributedProofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This filewasproduced from images generously made available by
produced from images generously made available byTheInternet Archive/American Libraries.)All the images are linked to the better-quality ones. Tosee them, please click on the image.Count ZeppelinCOUNT ZEPPELIN1838-1917]ZeppelinThe Story of a Great AchievementFor the great vision and unfaltering devotion to an ideathat gave the rigid airship to the world, this compilationis my humble tribute to the memory of Count Zeppelin.Harry VisseringChicago, August, 1922 Copyright 1922 byHarry Vissering
All rights reserved including that oftranslation into foreign languages.The forces of nature cannot be eliminated but theymay be balanced one against the other.Count Zeppelin,Friedrichshafen, May 1914.The savage can fasten only a dozen pounds on hisback and swim the river. When he makes an axe, fellsa tree, and builds a raft, he can carry many times adozen pounds. As soon as he learns to rip logs intoboards and build a boat, he multiplies his power ahundredfold; and when to this he adds modernsciences he can produce the monster steel leviathansthat defy wind, storm and distance, and bear to theuttermost parts of the earth burdens a millionfoldgreater than the savage could carry across the narrowriver.”Horace MannFOREWORD“Of all inventions, the alphabet and the printing pressalone excepted, those inventions which abridgedistance have done most for civilization.”Macaulay.The economic value of the fast transportation ofpassengers, mail and express matter has been wellproven. The existing high speed railway trains andocean liners are the result of the ever increasing
demand for rapid communication both on land andwater.Saving in time is the great essential. The maximumsurface speed has apparently been attained. Therailways and steamships of today, while indeed fast,have reached their economical limit of speed and it isnot to be expected that they will be able, because ofthe enormous additional cost of operation involved, toattain much greater speeds.The large Zeppelin Airship supplies the demand for amuch faster, more luxurious, more comfortable andmore safe long distance transportation. It is notrestricted by the geographical limitations of the railwayand the steamship. A Zeppelin can go anywhere, infact the cruising radius of a Zeppelin is only limited bythe size of the ship and the amount of fuel it can carry.Zeppelins, only slightly larger than those actually flownduring the last few months of the war, are capable ofsafely and quickly making a non-stop flight from Berlinto Chicago and from New York to Paris in 56 hours,carrying 100 passengers and in addition 12 tons ofmail or express matter.In November, 1917, the Zeppelin L-59 made a non-stop flight from Jambol, Bulgaria, to a point just westof Khartum in Africa and return to Jambol in 95 hours(4 days) covering a distance of 4225 miles andcarrying more than 14 tons of freight besides a crewof 22, which performance remains a world’s record forall kinds of aircraft, airship or aeroplane.In July, 1919, the British Rigid Airship R-34 (copy of
In July, 1919, the British Rigid Airship R-34 (copy ofthe Zeppelin L-33 brought down in England) crossedthe Atlantic in 103 hours and after being refueled atNew York returned home in 75 hours.Count Zeppelin, Doctor Eckener and Capt. StrasserCount Zeppelin, Doctor Eckener and Capt. Strasser(Chief of Naval Air Service). On the occasion of thelast visit of the Count to the Airship Harbor atNordholz.Dr. Ing. Ludwig Dürr, Chief EngineerDr. Ing. Ludwig Dürr, Chief Engineer.Who was associated with Count Zeppelin from thestart.The German Airship Transportation Company—DELAG—(a Zeppelin subsidiary) during a period ofthree years just before the war, 1911-14, carried34,228 passengers without a single injury to eitherpassengers or crews, and after the war, from August24th to December 1st, 1919, by means of theimproved Zeppelin “Bodensee” carried 2,380passengers, 11,000 pounds of mail (440,000 letters),and 6,600 pounds of express matter, exclusive ofcrews, between Friedrichshafen (Swiss frontier) andBerlin under unfavorable weather and terminalconditions, besides a flight from Berlin to Stockholmand return.The U. S. Government has concluded arrangements(June, 1922) with the Allied Powers whereby the U. S.Navy will receive a modern Zeppelin as a part ofAmerica’s share of the aerial reparations.
This new Zeppelin will embody the very latestimprovements in airship design and will be deliveredby being flown from Berlin across the Atlantic to theNavy’s Airship Harbor at Lakehurst, New Jersey. It willbe built by Luftschiffbau-Zeppelin (Zeppelin AirshipBuilding Co., Ltd.), at their Friedrichshafen Works andwill be a 70,000 cubic meter (2,400,000 cu. ft.) gascapacity commercial type, as it is intended that it willbe flown in the United States to demonstrate thesafety and practicability of long distance airship-transport. It will be delivered by a Zeppelin crew. Thearrival in the United States of this strictly modernZeppelin will no doubt create a wonderful interest asthe American people have never seen a real Zeppelinand it will give a great impetus to airship activitiesthroughout the world.The U. S. Navy are building at Lakehurst, N. J., theZR-1 modeled after the Zeppelin L-49. The ZR-1 willbe of 55,000 cubic meters (1,940,000 cu. ft.) gascapacity and is intended for use as an experimentaland training ship.Luftschiffbau-Zeppelin is building (August, 1922) atFriedrichshafen a Zeppelin of 30,000 cubic meters(1,059,000 cu. ft.) gas capacity to be used forexperimental and training purposes. It will be finishedin the winter of 1922-23 and in time to take advantageof some of the worst of winter weather conditions forexperiments having to do with airship navigation underthe extremes of weather and temperature.Considerable of the information contained in these
pages has been furnished by Luftschiffbau-Zeppelinfor which the author is greatly indebted to them.HARRY VISSERINGPLATE 1Zeppelin LZ-1Zeppelin “LZ-1” First Ascent July 2nd, 1900.Count Zeppelin's floating shedCount Zeppelin’s First Floating Shed on LakeConstance (Bodensee) and the Zeppelin “LZ-1”, July1900.CHAPTER IZeppelin and His AirshipsCount Ferdinand von Zeppelin was born at Constanceon Lake Constance (Bodensee), Germany, July 8th,1838. His boyhood was not unlike that of others inCentral Europe; and, as a matter of course, youngZeppelin was enrolled at a military school atLudwigsburg, from which he in due time graduatedinto a lieutenancy in the Wurttemberg Army, but hewas not particularly enthralled with the quiet life of agarrison in peace time. His creative facultiesdemanded something more of life than the routine ofinspections, drills and dress parades. When he died onMarch 8, 1917, in Berlin, the whole world mourned theloss of one whose genius and vision had developedthe rigid airship into a practical vehicle of the sky,
proved of inestimable value in peace and war.Zeppelin had lived to see more than a hundred rigidairships built from his designs and under his personalsupervision. And so completely was his personalityinterwoven with the creation of these aerial giants thatthroughout the world all dirigible lighter-than-air craftare looked upon as the noted Zeppelins, and arereferred to as such. It is an unconscious but none theless fitting tribute to the man who, starting when hewas past the half century mark, has made possible thegreatest of all vehicles for us to use in our newdominion—the air.An Officer in the American Union ArmyPLATE 2Zeppelin LZ-3Zeppelin “LZ-3” Over Count Zeppelin’s First FloatingShed October 1906.Zeppelin LZ-3Zeppelin “LZ-3” in First Temporary Land Shed.Which was erected and used while the new doubleshed, completed in 1908, was being built atFriedrichshafen.Here in America the Civil War was attracting theadventurous from all parts of the world and shortlyafter it started, Zeppelin came over to join the UnionArmy as a volunteer officer and thus to add to hismilitary education, but Zeppelin was not only theofficer. He loved to roam in out of the way places and
whenever opportunity afforded he organized huntingparties and went off on long sojourns in the thensparsely inhabited regions of the Mississippi Valley.Here he played the explorer and wrote letters backhome dwelling on the pleasures of exploration and thepossibilities in store for him who could inventsomething that would take one to the far andinaccessible parts of the earth.Zeppelin’s First Rigid DesignHis impressions gained during the American Civil War,where he had the opportunity of making captiveballoon ascensions, and also in the Franco-GermanWar where he had the opportunity of watching thenumerous balloons leaving Paris during the siege, nodoubt, first originated in Zeppelin’s mind the thought ofdeveloping a large rigid airship. In fact, as early as1873 he designed a large rigid airship, sub-divided intosingle compartments and he emphasized theimportance of such aircraft for long distancetransportation in order to help in the civilization ofmankind.In 1887 Zeppelin submitted a memorandum to theKing of Wurttemberg in which he explained in detailthe requirements of a really successful airship andstated many reasons why such airships ought to belarge and of rigid construction. However, nothing ofimportance was actually accomplished until heresigned as a General in 1891 in order to give his fulltime to his invention.PLATE 3
Zeppelin LZ-4Zeppelin “LZ-4Starting From the Floating Shed on a Twenty-four Hour Flight, June 1908.Count Zeppelin's second floating shedCount Zeppelin’s Second Floating Shed With Zeppelin“LZ-5”. Lake Constance (Bodensee) 1908.In 1894 at the age of 56 years, with the assistance ofan Engineer, Kober, he had completed the design of arigid airship, and the modern rigid airship of today isnot essentially different from Zeppelin’s first design.He submitted these designs to a special committeethat had been appointed by the most famous of theGerman scientific authorities and was greatlydisappointed over the decision of the committeewhich, although they could not find any essential faultsin the Count’s design, could not recommend that anairship be built in accordance with Zeppelin’s plans.Admitting that he was not the first to conceive the ideaof rigid airships, Count Zeppelin, however, insisted thathe had arrived at new principles and that theseprinciples were sound. There had been severalattempts to build rigids, but there always had been toomuch weight of the necessarily voluminous framework,which so anchored the craft with its own weight that itcould not lift itself. The discovery of aluminum madethis problem less difficult, however, and many modelswere designed with the framework of this lightmaterial.Two years after Count Zeppelin had completed his first
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