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Minimalism and post minimalism: Theories and reper

8 pages
M i n i m a l i s m a n d P o s t m i n i m a l i s m : t h e o r i e s a n d r e p e r c u s s i o n s Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism 4372 The School of the Art Institute of Chicago David Getsy, Instructor [d-getsy@nwu.edu] Spring 2000 / Tuesdays 9 am - 12 pm / Champlain 319 c o u r s e de s c r i pt i o n Providing an in-depth investigation into the innovations in art theory and practice commonly known as “Minimalism” and “Postminimalism,” the course follows the development of Minimal stylehood and tracks its far-reaching implications. Throughout, the greater emphasis on the viewer’s contribution to the aesthetic encounter, the transformation of the role of the artist, and the expanded definition of art will be examined. Close evaluations of primary texts and art objects will form the basis for a discussion. • • • m e t h o d o f e va l u a t i o n Students will be evaluated primarily on attendance, preparation, and class discussion. All students are expected to attend class meetings with the required readings completed. There will be two writing assignments: (1) a short paper on a relevant artwork in a Chicago collection or public space due on 28 March 2000 and (2) an in- class final examination to be held on 9 May 2000. The examination will be based primarily on the readings and class discussions. Students have the option of writing a full research paper on a relevant topic in lieu of taking the final. Papers must be 12-15 pages in length.
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M i n i m a l i s m a n d P o s t m i n i m a l i s m : t h e o r i e s a n d r e p e r c u s s i o n s Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism 4372 The School of the Art Institute of Chicago David Getsy, Instructor [d-getsy@nwu.edu] Spring 2000 / Tuesdays 9 am - 12 pm / Champlain 319
c o u r s e d e s c r i p t i o n Providing an in-depth investigation into the innovations in art theory and practice commonly known as “Minimalism” and “Postminimalism,” the course follows the development of Minimal stylehood and tracks its far-reaching implications. Throughout, the greater emphasis on the viewers contribution to the aesthetic encounter, the transformation of the role of the artist, and the expanded definition of art will be examined. Close evaluations of primary texts and art objects will form the basis for a discussion.
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m e t h o d o f e v a l u a t i o n Students will be evaluated primarily on attendance, preparation, and class discussion. All students are expected to attend class meetings with the required readings completed. There will be two writing assignments: (1) a short paper on a relevant artwork in a Chicago collection or public space due on 28 March 2000 and (2) an in-class final examination to be held on 9 May 2000. The examination will be based primarily on the readings and class discussions. Students have the option of writing a full research paper on a relevant topic in lieu of taking the final. Papers must be 12-15 pages in length. Final topics must be approved by 4 April 2000. No student may choose to opt for a paper after this date.
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c o u r s e r e a d i n g s The majority of readings can be found in the required course text book: Gregory BATTCOCK, ed.,Minimal Art: A Critical Anthology(Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996). Other readings will be made available for photocopying at least one week before the session and can be found in the library on reserve. Many can also be found in the anthology Kristine STILESand Peter Howard SELZ,Theories and documents of contemporary art : a sourcebook of artists' writings, California studies in the history of art 35 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996), though this book has not been ordered through the bookstore. All readings must be done carefully, and students will be expected to raise critical questions about the texts. Readings listed for ‘further reference are optional and are meant to aid students pursuing the research paper option. Any concerns about the availability of readings or suggestions for alternative readings should be addressed to the professor as soon as possible.
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s e s s i o n c a l e n d a r 1 February 2000 i n t r o d u c t i o n further referenceNicolas Calas, “Subject Matter in the Work of Barnett Newman,” Battcock 109-15 Donald Judd, “Local History,” reprinted inComplete Writings 1959-1975(Halifax: The Press of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, 1975), pp. 148-56
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8 February 2000 c o m p e t i n g d e f i n i t i o n s o f t h e M i n i m a l required reading• Donald Judd, Excerpts from “Specific Objects” (1965), in K. Stiles and P. Selz, Theories and documents of contemporary art : a sourcebook of artists' writings, California studies in the history of art 35 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996), pp. 114-17 • Barbara Rose, “ABC Art” (1965), Battcock 274-97 [skim] • Robert Morris, “Notes on Sculpture [1 and 2]” (1966), Battcock 222-35 • Mel Bochner, “Primary Structures,”Arts Magazine40.8 (June 1966), pp. 32-35 • Lucy Lippard, “10 Structurists in 20 Paragraphs,” inMinimal Art, exh. cat. (The Hague: Haagsgemeentemuseum, 1968), pp. 25-31 further referenceWagstaff, “Talking with Tony Smith” (1966), Battcock 381-86• Samuel • Peter Hutchinson, “Mannerism in the Abstract” (1966), Battcock 187-94 • Corinne Robins, “Object, Structure or Sculpture: Where Are We?,”Arts Magazine 40.9 (September 1966), pp. 33-37 • Robert Morris, “Notes on Sculpture, part 3: Notes and Nonsequiturs,”Artforum 5.10 (Summer 1967), pp. 24-29 • Phyllis Tuchman, “Minimalism and Critical Response,”Artforum15.9 (May 1977), pp. 26-31 • Bruce Altshuler,The Avant-Garde Exhibition: New Art in the 20th Century (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994) • Alex Potts, “The Minimalist Object and the Photographic Image,” in G. Johnson, ed.,Sculpture and Photography: Envisioning the Third Dimension(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 182ff
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15 February 2000 m o d e r n i s t p a i n t i n g a n d t h e ‘ i n e v i t a b i l i t y  t h e m i n i m a l : n o n -r e l a t i o n a l c o m p o s i t i o n a n d t h e e m e r g e n c e o f s h a p e required reading• Clement Greenberg, “The Recentness of Sculpture” (1967), Battcock 180-86 • Bruce Glaser and Lucy Lippard, “Questions to Stella and Judd” (1964-66), Battcock 148-64 • Will Insley interviewed by Elayne Varian, “Schemata 7” (1967), Battcock 359-63 • Michael Fried, “Shape as Form: Frank Stellas Irregular Polygons” (1966) reprinted inArt and Objecthood: Essays and Reviews(Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998), pp. 77-99 • Frank Stella, Excerpts from “The Pratt Lecture” (1966), reptinted in Stiles and Selz 1996, pp. 113-14 further reference• Caroline Jones,Machine in the Studio: Constructing the Postwar American Artist (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996) • Thierry de Duve, “The Monochrome and the Blank Canvas,” inReconstructing Modernism: Art in New York, Paris, and Montreal 1954-1964, ed. S. Guilbaut (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1990)
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22 February 2000 e n c o u n t e r i n g t h e M i n i m a l i s t o b j e c t required readingReise, “‘Untitled 1969: A Footnote on Art and Minimal Stylehood,”• Barbara Studio International177.910 (April 1969), pp. 166-7 • Lucy Lippard, “Eros Presumptive” (1967), Battcock 209-21 • Dan Flavin, “Writings” (1967), Battcock 401-402 • John Perreault, “Minimal Abstracts” (1967), Battcock 256-62 • Dan Flavin, “Some Remarks . . . Excerpts from a Spleenish Journal” (1966), reprinted in Stiles and Selz 125-26
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further reference• Rosalind Krauss, “Allusion and Illustion in Donald Judd,”Artforum4.9 (May 1966), pp. 24-26 • Donald Judd, “Some Aspects of Colour in General and Red and Black in Particular,”Artforum32.10 (Summer 1994), pp. 70-79, 110, 113 • Staatliche Kunsthalle Baden-Baden,new uses for fluourescent light with diagrams, drawings and prints from Dan Flavin 2/26-4/16/1989, exh. cat., 1989 • Barbara Rose, “Sculpture, Intimacy and Perception,” in14 Sculptors: The Industrial Edge, exh. cat. (Minneapolis: Walker Art Center, 1969), pp. 7-9 • Barbara Rose, "A New Aesthetic,"A New Aesthetic, exh. cat. (Washington, D.C.: The Washington Gallery of Modern Art), 8-20 NOTE: The second half of class will take place in the Art Institute galleries
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29 February 2000 m i n i m i z i n g t h e a r t i s t : s e r i a l i t y , r e p e t i t i o n , l i t e r a l i s m required reading• Mel Bochner, “Serial Art, Systems, Solipsism” (1967), Battcock pp. 92-102 • David Bourdon, “The Razed Sites of Carl Andre” (1966), Battcock pp. 103-108 • Toby Mussman, “Literalness and the Infinite [part I]” (1966), Battcock 236-47 • Rosalind Krauss, “LeWitt in Progress,”The Originality of the Avant-Garde and Other Modernist Myths(Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1985), pp. 245-69 further reference• Roberta Smith, “Multiple Returns,”Art in America70.3 (March 1982), pp. 112-14 • Rosalind Krauss, “Grids,”The Originality of the Avant-Garde and Other Modernist Myths(Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1985), pp. 8-22 • E. C. Goosen, “The Artist Speaks: Robert Morris,”Art in America58.3 (May 1970), pp. 104-11 • Rosalind Krauss, “The LeWitt Matrix,” inSol LeWitt: Structures 1962-1993, exh. cat. (Oxford: Museum of Modern Art, 1993) • Donald Kuspit, “Wittgensteinean Aspects of Minimal Art,” inThe Critic is Artist: The Intentionality of Art(Ann Arbor, Michigan: UMI Reseach Press, 1984), pp. 243-52 • David Bourdon, “A Redefinition of Sculpture,” inCarl Andre: Sculpture 1959-1977, exh. cat. (New York, Jaap Rietman, Inc., 1978), pp. 13-40 • Briony Fer, “Judds Specific Objects,”On abstract art(New Haven: Yale University Press, 1997), pp. 131-52 NOTE: The second half of class may take place in the Art Institute galleries
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7 March 2000 t h e p o l i t i c s o f M i n i m a l i s m required reading• Jeanne Siegal, “Carl Andre: Artworker,”Studio International180 (November 1970), pp. 175-79 • Anna Chave, “Minimalism and the Rhetoric of Power,”Arts Magazine(January 1990), pp. 44-63 • Rosalind Krauss, “The Cultural Logic of the Late Capitalist Museum,”October 54 (Fall 1990), pp. 3-17 • Dan Graham, Photographs fromHomes for America(1966), Battcock 175-79 further referenceBerger,• Maurice Labyrinths: Robert Morris, Minimalism, and the 1960s(New York: Harper & Row, 1989) • Brian ODoherty,Inside the White Cube: The Ideology of Gallery Space(San Francisco: Lapis Press, 1986) • Karl Beveridge and Ian Burn, “Don Judd,”The Fox2 (1975), pp. 128-42 • “The Artist and Politics: A Symposium,”Artforum(Sept 1970), pp. 35-39
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• Carl Andre, Hans Haacke, Cindy Nemser, John Perreault and Athena Tacha Spear, “The Role of the Artist in Todays Society: A Symposium at Oberlin,”Allen Memorial Art Museum Bulletin30.3 (Spring 1973): supplement • Alex Alberro, “The Turn of the Screw: Daniel Buren, Dan Flavin, and the Sixth Guggenheim International Exhibition,”October80 (Spring 1997): 57-84 • Charles Reeve, “Cold Metal: Donald Judds Hidden Historicity,”Art History15.4 (December 1992), pp. 486-504
14 March 2000 t h e a n a e s t h e t i c s o f m i n i m a l i s m : M i c h a e l F r i e d  s “ A r t a n d O b j e c t h o o d ” required reading• Michael Fried, “Art and Objecthood” (1967), in Battcock 116-47 • Robert Smithson, “Letter to the Editor” (1967), reprinted inRobert Smithson: Collected Writings, ed. J. Flam (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996), pp. 66-67 • Barbara Rose, “The Politics of Art I: Aesthetics as Revolution” (1968), Autocritique: Essays on Art and Anti-Art, 1963-1987(New York: Weidenfeld and Nicholson, 1988), pp. 229-33 further referenceBuchloh, Michael Fried and Rosalind Krauss, “Theories of Art after• Benjamin Minimalism and Pop,”Discussions in Contemporary Culture1, ed. H. Foster (Seattle: Bay Press, 1987), pp. 55-87 • Stephen Melville, “Notes on the Reemergence of Allegory, the Forgetting of Modernism, the Necessity of Rhetoric, and the Condition of Publicity in Art and Criticism,”October19 (Winter 1981), pp. 55-92 • Rosalind Krauss,The Optical Unconscious(Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1993) • Michael Fried, “An Introduction to My Art Criticism” (1998), inArt and Objecthood: Essays and Reviews(Chicago: University of Chicago Press), 1-74 • Sheldon Nodelman, “Sixties Art: Some Philosophical Perspectives,”Perspecta: The Yale Architectural Journal11 (1967), pp. 72-89 • Richard Wollheim, “Minimal Art” (1965), Battcock 387-99 • Annette Michelson, “Robert Morris: An Aesthetics of Transgression,” inRobert Morris, exh. cat. (Washington, D.C.: Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1970), pp. 7-75 • Frances Colpitt, “The Issue of Boredom: Is It Interesting?,”Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism43.4 (Summer 1985), pp. 359-65 • Richard Lind, “Why Isnt Minimal Art Boring?,”Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism45.2 (Winter 1986), pp. 195-97
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21 March 2000 s p r i n g b r e a k : C L A S S C A N C E L L E D
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28 March 2000 t h e p o s t - m o d e r n i s t r e - r e a d i n g o f t h e M i n i m a l i s t m o m e n t required reading• Hal Foster, “The Crux of Minimalism,” [revised] inThe Return of the Real: The Avant-Garde at the End of the Century(Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1996), pp. 35-68 • Rosalind Krauss, “Sense and Sensibility: Reflections on Post 60s Sculpture,” Artforum12.3 (November 1973), pp. 43-53 further referenceKrauss, “Overcoming the Limits of Matter: On Revising Minimalism,”• Rosalind in J. Elderfield, ed.,American Art of the 1960s(New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1991)
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• Rosalind Krauss, “Sculpture in the Expanded Field,” reprinted inThe Anti-Aesthetic: Essays on Postmodern Culture, ed. H. Foster (Seattle: Bay Press, 1983), pp. 31-42 • Rosalind Krauss, et al., “The Reception of the Sixties,”October69 (Summer 1994), pp. 3-21 • Margaret Iversen, “Spectators of postmodern art: from Minimalism to feminism,” inPostmodernism and the re-reading of modernity, ed. F. Barker, et al. (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1992), pp. 180-96 • Brian Wallis, “Notes on (Re)viewing Donald Judds Work,”Donald Judd: Eight Works in Three Dimensions, exh. cat. (Charlotte, North Carolina: Knight Gallery, 1984), n. p. • Paul Beidler, “The Postmodern Sublime: Kant and Tony Smiths Anecdote of the Cube,”Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism53.2 (Spring 1995), pp. 177-86 • Lynn Zelevansky,Sense and Sensibility: Women and Minimalism in the 1990s, exh. cat (New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1994) • Maurice Berger, “Performativity and Minimalism in Recent American Art,” Minimal Politics, exh. cat., Fine Arts Gallery, University of Maryland, Issues in Cultural Theory 1 (New York: D.A.P., 1997), pp. 1-35 Writing assignment due at the beginning of class
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4 April 2000 a n t i - f o r m i n t h e w o r k o f R o b e r t M o r r i s , B a r r y L e V a , A l a n S a r e t , a n d R i c h a r d S e r r a required reading• Robert Morris, “Antiform,”Artforum6.8 (April 1968), pp. 33-35 • Robert Morris, “Notes on Sculpture, part IV: Beyond Objects,”Artforum7.8 (April 1969), pp. 50-64 • Richard Serra, “Play it Again, Sam,”Richard Serra: Writings/Interviews (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994): 7-9 • Gregoire Müller, “Robert Morris Presents Anti-Form: The Castelli Warehouse Show” (1969), reprinted in R. Armstrong and R. Marshall,The New Sculpture 1965-75, exh. cat. (New York: Whitney Museum of American Art, 1990), p. 109 • Robert Pincus-Witten, “Barry Le Va: The Invisibility of Content,” in Postminimalism(New York: Out of London Press, 1977), pp. 119-27 further referencePincus-Witten, “The Disintegration of Minimalism: Five Pictorial• Robert Sculptors” (1971) and “The Seventies” (1977), inEye to Eye: Twenty Years of Art Criticism, Contemporary American Art Critics 4 (Ann Arbor, Michigan: UMI Research Press, 1984), pp. 119-29 • Jane Livingston, “Barry Le Va: Distributional Sculpture,”Artforum(November 1968) • Fidel A. Danieli, “Some New Los Angeles Artists,”Artforum6.7 (March 1968), pp. 44-48 • Marcia Tucker, "Barry Le Va: Work from 1966-1978,"Barry Le Va: Four Consecutive Installations & Drawings 1967-1978, exh. cat. (New York: The New Museum, 1978), 5-53 • Pepe Karmel,Robert Morris: The Felt Works, exh. cat. (New York: Grey Art Gallery and Study Center, 1989) Deadline for submission of final topics for all students choosing to write a research paper instead of taking the final examination
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11 April 2000
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C r i t W e e k : N O C L A S S
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18 April 2000 f r o m s h a p e t o s u b s t a n c e : m a t e r i a l s a n d p r o c e s s e s required reading• Lucy Lippard, “Eccentric Abstraction” (1966), reprinted in R. Armstrong and R. Marshall,The New Sculpture 1965-75, exh. cat. (New York: Whitney Museum of American Art, 1990), pp. 54-58 • Max Kozloff, “9 in a Warehouse: an ‘attack on the status of the object” (1969), reprinted in R. Armstrong and R. Marshall,The New Sculpture 1965-75, exh. cat. (New York: Whitney Museum of American Art, 1990), pp. 106-107 • Robert Pincus-Witten, “Introduction,”Postminimalism(New York: Out of London Press, 1977), pp. 13-18 • Richard Serra, “Verb List” (1967-68), reprinted inRichard Serra: Writings/Interviews(Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994): pp. 3-4 • Briony Fer, “Objects Beyond Objecthood,”Oxford Art Journal22.2 (1999), pp. 25-36 further referenceSandler, “1967: Out of Minimal Sculpture,”• Irving 1967: At the Crossroads, ed. J. Kardon, exh. cat. (Philadelphia: Institute of Contemporary Art, 1987), pp. 40-51 • Dore Ashton, “Exercises in Anti-Style: Six Ways of Regarding Un, In, and Anti-form,”Arts Magazine43 (April 1969): 45-47 • Robert C. Morgan, “Eccentric Abstraction and Postminimalism,”Flash Art144 (January-February 1989), pp. 73-81 NOTE: The second half of class will take place in the Art Institute galleries
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25 April 2000 E v a H e s s e : p a r a d i g m a t i c P o s t m i n i m a l i s t ? required reading• Eva Hesse, interview with Cindy Nemser [1970] inAmerican Artists on Art from 1940 to 1980, ed. E. Johnson (New York: Harper & Row, 1982): 188-96 • Eva Hesse, Statement [1969?], inEva Hesse: A Memorial Exhibition(New York: Guggenheim Museum, 1972): n.p. • Anne Wagner, “Another Hesse,”October69 (Summer 1994): 49-84 • Rosalind Krauss, “Eva Hesse: Contingent” (1972), inBachelors(Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1999), 91-100 Further readingPincus-Witten, "Eva Hesse: More Light on the Transition from Post-• Robert Minimalism to the Sublime” (1971) reprinted inPostminimalism(New York: Out of London Press, 1977), pp. 42-62 • Lucy Lippard,Eva Hesse(New York: Da Capo Press, 1992/1976) • Briony Fer, “Bordering on Blank: Eva Hesse and Minimalism,”On abstract art (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1997), pp. 190-30 • Briony Fer, “Treading Blindly, or the Excessive Presence of the Object,”Art History20.2 (June 1997), pp. 268-88 • Anna Chave, “Eva Hesse: A ‘Girl Being a Sculpture,” in H. Cooper, ed.,Eva Hesse: A Retrospective, exh. cat. (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992), pp. 99-117 • Anna Chave, “Striking Poses: The Absurdist Theatrics of Eva Hesse,” in G. Johnson, ed.,Sculpture and Photography: Envisioning the Third Dimension (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 166-81 • Barbara Rose, “About Eva Hesse,”Autocritique: Essays on Art and Anti-Art, 1963-1987(New York: Weidenfeld and Nicholson, 1988), pp. 202-203
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2 May 2000 ‘ t h e c o n v e n t i o n s o f a r t a r e a l t e r e d b y w o r k s o f a r t  : r e p e r c u s s i o n s i n t o t h e 1 9 7 0 s required reading• Toby Mussman, “Literalness and the Infinte [part II]” (1966), Battcock 247-50 • Brian ODoherty, “Minus Plato” (1966), Battcock 251-55 • Sol Lewitt, “Sentences on Conceptual Art” (1969), in Lucy Lippard,Six Years: The dematerialization of the art object from 1966 to 1972(Berkeley: University of California Press, 1973/1997), pp. 75-76 • Mary Kelley, “Re-viewing Modernist Criticism” (1981), reprinted in B. Wallis, ed.,Art After Modernism: Rethinking Representation(New York: The New Museum of Contemporary Art, 1984), pp. 87-103 further readingFoster, “Wild Signs: The Breakup of the Sign in Seventies Art,” in A. Ross,• Hal ed.,Universal Abandon? The Politics of Postmodernism(Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 1989), pp. 251-68 • Rosalind Krauss, “Double Negative: A New Syntax for Sculpture,”Passages in Modern Sculpture(Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1977) • Jack Flam, ed.,Robert Smithson: Collected Writings(Berkeley: Univ. of CA, 1996) • Joseph Kosuth, “Art after Philosophy,”Studio International(Nov 1969): 160-61 • Craig Owens, “Earthwords,”October10 (Fall 1979): 120-30 • Benjamin Buchloh, “Conceptual Art 1962-69,”October5 (Winter 1990) • Benjamin Buchloh, “Michael Asher and the Conclusion of Modernist Sculpture” (1980 [1979]), inPerformance Text(e)s & Documents, ed. Chantel Pontbriand (Montreal: les éditions Parachute, 1981): 55-65. • Leslie C. Jones, “Transgressive Femininity: Art and Gender in the Sixties and Seventies,”Abject Art: Repulsion and Desire in American Art, exh. cat. (New York: Whitney Museum of American Art, 1993), pp. 33-57
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9 May 2000 f i n a l e x a m i n a t i o n
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g e n e r a l r e f e r e n c e s Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshall,The New Sculpture 1965-75, exh. cat. (New York: Whitney Museum of American Art, 1990). David Batchelor,Minimalism(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997). Centre Georges Pompidou,Robert Morris, exh. cat. (Paris: Éditions du Centre Georges Pompidou, 1995). Frances Colpitt,Minimal Art: The Critical Perspective(Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1990) Georges Didi-Huberman,Ce Que Nous Voyons, Ce Qui Nous Regarde(Paris: Éditions de Minuit, 1992). Guggenheim Museum SoHo,Robert Morris, exh. cat. (New York: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1994). Barbara Haskell,BLAM! The Explosion of Pop, Minimalism, and Performance, 1958-1964, exh. cat. (New York: Whitney Museum of American Art, 1983). Barbara Haskell,Donald Judd, exh. cat. (New York: Whitney Museum of American Art, 1988). Donld Judd,Donald Judd: Complete Writings 1959-1975(Halifax: Nova Scotia College of Art, 1975). Donald Judd,Donald Judd: Complete Writings 1975-1986(Eindhoven: Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum, 1987). Rosalind Krauss,Passages in Modern Sculpture(Cambridge: MIT Press, 1977) Rosalind Krauss,Richard Serra/Sculpture, exh. cat. (New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1986). Kynaston McShine,Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculptors(NY Jewish Museum, 1966). Robert Morris,Continuous Project Altered Daily: The Writings of Robert Morris(Cambridge: MIT Press, 1993). Brydon Smith,Donald Judd: Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings, Objects, and Woodblocks 1960-1974(Ottawa: National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 1975). Maurice Tuchman,American Sculpture of the Sixties, exh. cat. (Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1967).
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Marcia Tucker,Robert Morris, exh. cat. (New York: W.M.A.A., 1970). Marcia Tucker,Anti-Illusion: Procedures, Materials, exh. cat. (New York: W.M.A.A., 1970). Richard Wollheim,Art and Its Objects, 2nd ed. (Camrbidge: Cambridge University Press, 1980 [1968])
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