//img.uscri.be/pth/2b2cc03136336ee6405beadb6f08df17c4ed86be
Cet ouvrage fait partie de la bibliothèque YouScribe
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le lire en ligne
En savoir plus

Expression Libraries as Tools for the Development of Subunit Vaccines and Novel Detection Molecules for Orthopoxviruses [Elektronische Ressource] / Lilija Miller. Betreuer: Andreas Nitsche

De
113 pages
 Expression Libraries as Tools for the Development of Subunit Vaccines and Novel Detection Molecules for Orthopoxviruses  vorgelegt von  Diplom‐Ingenieurin  Lilija Miller aus Berlin   Von der Fakultät III – Prozesswissenschaften der Technischen Universität Berlin zur Erlangung des akademischen Grades Doktorin der Ingenieurwissenschaften ‐Dr.‐Ing.‐  genehmigte Dissertation  Promotionsausschuss:  Vorsitzender:  Prof. Dr. L.‐A. Garbe Berichter:    Prof. Dr. R. Lauster    PD Dr. A. Nitsche Berichter:    Prof. Dr. J. Kurreck  Tag der wissenschaftlichen Aussprache: 02. Dezember 2011  Berlin 2011 D83                             “You  can  accurately  judge  the  research  of  others  only  after you’ve done your own and can understand the messy reality behind what is so smoothly and confidently presented in your textbooks or by experts on TV.” [1]    ‐ I ‐                              To my parents, my sister and my other half   ‐ II ‐   Acknowledgments As with all projects in life, this one wouldn’t have been possible to complete without the help of many persons, including my dear colleagues but also friends and family. It is thus highly likely that I won’t be able to acknowledge every single contribution by name.
Voir plus Voir moins

 
Expression Libraries as Tools for the 
Development of Subunit Vaccines and Novel 
Detection Molecules for Orthopoxviruses 
 
vorgelegt von  
Diplom‐Ingenieurin  
Lilija Miller 
aus Berlin 
 

Von der Fakultät III – Prozesswissenschaften 
der Technischen Universität Berlin 
zur Erlangung des akademischen Grades 
Doktorin der Ingenieurwissenschaften 
‐Dr.‐Ing.‐ 

genehmigte Dissertation 



Promotionsausschuss: 
 
Vorsitzender:  Prof. Dr. L.‐A. Garbe 
Berichter:    Prof. Dr. R. Lauster    PD Dr. A. Nitsche 
Berichter:    Prof. Dr. J. Kurreck 
 
Tag der wissenschaftlichen Aussprache: 02. Dezember 2011 
 
Berlin 2011 
D83 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
“You  can  accurately  judge  the  research  of  others  only  after 
you’ve done your own and can understand the messy reality 
behind what is so smoothly and confidently presented in your 
textbooks or by experts on TV.” [1] 
 
  ‐ I ‐  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To my parents, my sister and my other half 
  ‐ II ‐  
Acknowledgments 
As with all projects in life, this one wouldn’t have been possible to complete without 
the help of many persons, including my dear colleagues but also friends and family. It 
is thus highly likely that I won’t be able to acknowledge every single contribution by 
name. Therefore, in order to do justice, I would first like to thank everyone who helped 
me through this demanding but interesting time, independent of the kind of support!  
I am grateful to Andreas Nitsche for giving me the opportunity to do my PhD project 
and  for  continuously  providing  motivation  and  support.  Sincere  thanks  to  my 
colleague, my best friend, and my fellow in misery Daniel Stern!  Thank  you  for  the 
innumerable,  valuable  scientific  discussions,  for  frequent  encouragement  and  for 
always having a sympathetic ear. Without you the time would have been much harder! 
Further, I’d like to thank all members of the ZBS1 group for the friendly atmosphere, 
company during lunch, and the badminton tournaments.  
A great contribution to this thesis was done by the students I supervised during my 
PhD project. Lisa Schlicher, Isabel Choschzick, and Christoph Hapke contributed to the 
“Expression  library  project”  during  their  internships.  Marco  Richter  and  Christoph 
Hapke  further  contributed  to  this  project  by  completing  their  master’s  thesis  or 
bachelor’s thesis, respectively. Johannes von Recum contributed to the “Phage Display 
project”  within  the  scope  of  his  master’s  thesis.  I  am  thankful  to  Janine  Michel,  who 
helped  me  with  phage  display  selections  and  subsequent  peptide  characterization. 
Wojtek  P.  Dabrowski  contributed  to  the  same  project  by  programming  the  “Library 
Insert  Finder”  software  and  thus  considerably  simplified  the  search for the random 
peptide sequences.  
I am also grateful to the staff of the photo laboratory for taking  great  pictures  of 
various agar plates and nitrocellulose filters and for printing my posters.  
Jung‐Won Sim‐Brandenburg and Delia Barz gave me excellent technical assistance, 
whereas  the  staff  of  the  sequencing  lab,  namely  Julia  Tesch,  Silvia Muschter, Julia 
Hinzmann,  and  Marlies  Panzer  provided  me  with  numerous  DNA  sequences.  I  am 
grateful to all of you for becoming more than colleagues but also valuable friends.  
Sincere  thanks  to  Ursula  Erikli  for  copy‐editing  and  continuous suggestions for 
improving my English language skills.  
This  work  was  funded  within  the  BMBF/VDI‐financed  BiGRUDI  network  of  the 
Robert Koch Institute (RKI; Berlin). In this context I am also thankful to the members 
of the “Aptamer work group” for the valuable scientific discussions. 
Most grateful I am to my parents who shaped me to be the person I am today. They 
always give me the feeling of being the best person in the entire world and thus help 
me  to  overcome  moments  of  uncertainty.  Last  but  not  least,  I  am  grateful  to  my 
partner for sharing the cheery moments with me as well as for supporting me in times 
of despair. Thank you so much for always having the right word at the right moment 
and for all the cooking.  
  ‐ III ‐  
Declaration of Authorship 
I  certify  that  the  work  presented  here  is,  to  the  best  of  my  knowledge  and  belief, 
original and the result of my own investigations, except as acknowledged. The present 
work has not been submitted, either in part or whole, for a degree at this or any other 
University. Parts of this work have been published under the following title:  
Miller, L., Richter, M., Hapke, C., Stern, D., & Nitsche, A. (2011) Genomic Expression 
Libraries  for  the  Identification  of  Cross‐Reactive  Orthopoxvirus  Antigens.  PLoS  ONE 
6(7): e21950. Epub 2011 Jul 14.  
 
Berlin,  
 
 
Lilija Miller 
 
  ‐ IV ‐  
Abstract 
The global eradication of smallpox led to the cessation of routine  smallpox 
vaccination due to rare but severe adverse reactions. Today, more than 30 years later, 
the majority of the world’s population has no protective immunity against poxviruses. 
Concurrently,  the  frequency  of  zoonotic  poxvirus  infections  with  monkeypox  and 
cowpox virus is increasing, accompanied by the fear of bioterro rist  attacks  with 
smallpox. These developments emphasize the need for bio‐preparedness programs to 
enable  rapid  and  effective  prevention  and  control  of  poxvirus‐associated  disease 
spread. Bio‐preparedness includes the availability of rapid detection methods as well 
as the existence of safe vaccines and therapeutics that can be administered  to  the 
majority  of  the  population.  Various  existing  poxvirus  detection methods are well‐
established and highly sensitive. However, they are usually not suitable for rapid on‐
site detection of biothreat agents. Conventional smallpox vaccines, on the other hand, 
show excellent immunogenic properties. Yet today, they can not be administered to a 
growing proportion of individuals with impaired immunity, urging the development of 
safer  vaccines.  Thereby,  recombinant  subunit  vaccines  are  considered  to  be  a  safer 
alternative to conventional smallpox vaccines.  
To speed up the development of subunit vaccines and to evaluate the applicability of 
synthetic peptide aptamers for poxvirus detection, screenings of bacteriophage‐based 
libraries were utilized in the present study. First, a low‐cost  approach  for  antigen 
discovery  was  established  and  evaluated.  This  approach  is  based  on  serological 
screenings  of  bacteriophage‐based  genomic  expression  libraries. These screenings 
resulted  in  the  identification  of  21  antigenic  proteins.  Sixteen  of  these  21  antigens 
were also found to be cross‐reactive  among  cowpox  and  vaccinia  virus.  In  addition, 
seven  of  identified  antigenic  cross‐reactive  proteins  A3,  A4,  D13,  E2,  E3,  E9,  and  H6 
are proposed to be included in subunit vaccines due to their an tigenicity  and 
conservation among orthopoxviruses.  
Additionally,  combinatorial  phage  display  methodology  was  utilized  to  identify 
poxvirus‐specific  peptide  ligands  as  novel  detection  molecules.  Affinity  selections  of 
random peptide phage display libraries against infectious virus  particles  yielded  17 
recurring  peptide  sequences  indicating  an  enrichment  of  poxvirus‐binding  phage 
clones.  After  characterization  of  these  17  binding  clones,  three  peptide  sequences 
were  synthesized  and  characterized  further.  Thereby,  one  phage‐derived  synthetic 
peptide was shown to bind selectively and specifically to vaccinia virus particles. This 
provides  important  insights  into  applicability  of  synthetic  molecules  for  detection  of 
biothreat agents. 
  ‐ V ‐  
Zusammenfassung 
Nach  der  erfolgreichen  globalen  Ausrottung  der  Pockenkrankheit  wurde  die 
Pockenimpfung  aufgrund  seltener  aber  schwerer  Komplikationen  eingestellt.  Heute, 
nach  mehr  als  30  Jahren,  weist  die  Mehrheit  der  Welt‐Bevölkerung  keinen  Immun‐
schutz mehr auf. Gleichzeitig steigt  neben  der  Häufigkeit  zoonotischer  Pockenvirus‐
infektionen mit Affen‐ oder Kuhpockenviren auch die Angst vor Bioterror‐Anschlägen 
mit  Variolaviren.  Diese  Entwicklungen  unterstreichen  die  Notwendigkeit  von 
Projekten,  die  vorbereitende  Maßnahmen  für  den  Fall  eines  Bioterroranschlags 
treffen, um die Ausbreitung von Krankheitserregern zu verhindern. Hierzu zählt neben 
der  Entwicklung  von  schnellen  und  einfach  zu  bedienenden  Diagnostikplattformen 
auch  die  Verfügbarkeit  von  Impfstoffen  und  Therapeutika,  die  der  Mehrheit  der 
Bevölkerung  verabreicht  werden  können.  Obwohl  bereits  zahlreiche, gut etablierte 
Methoden für den Nachweis von Pockenviren existieren, sind diese für eine schnelle 
Vor‐Ort‐Diagnostik  häufig  nicht  geeignet.  Vorhandene  konventionelle  Pockenimpf‐
stofe besitzen gute immunogene Eigenschaften, können jedoch einer  steigenden 
Anzahl  immunsupprimierter  Menschen  nicht  verabreicht  werden.  Somit  ist  eine 
Entwicklung  sicherer  Pockenimpfstoffe  erforderlich.  Hierbei,  stellen  Subunit‐Impf‐
stoffe eine potentiell sicherere Alternative zu konventionellen Impfstoffen dar.  
Um die Entwicklung von Subunit‐Impfstoffen voranzubringen und die Anwendbar‐
keit  synthetischer  Peptid‐Aptamere  für  Pockenvirusdetektion  zu  beurteilen,  wurden 
in  der  vorliegenden  Arbeit  Bakteriophagen‐basierte  Bibliotheken  gescreent.  Zuerst 
wurde  eine  kostengünstige  Methode  zur  Antigen‐Identifizierung  etabliert  und 
evaluiert. Bei dieser Methode werden Bakteriophagen‐basierte Expressionsbibliothe‐
ken mit Pocken‐Antiseren gescreent. Dank dieser serologischen Screenings konnten 21 
immunogene  Pockenproteine  identifiziert  werden.  Sechzehn  dieser  21  Proteine 
wurden  auch  als  kreuzreaktiv  zwischen  Vaccinia‐Virus  und  Kuhpockenvirus 
identifiziert. Nach einer Auswertung, werden sieben der identifizierten kreuzreaktiven 
Proteine A3, A4, D13, E2, E3, E9 und H6 aufgrund ihrer Antigenität und Konserviert‐
heit für die Verwendung in Subunit‐Impfstoffen vorgeschlagen.  
Außerdem  wird  die  kombinatorische  Phagen‐Display‐Methode  und  ihre  Verwen‐
dung zur Identifizierung pockenspezifischer Peptidliganden als neuartige Detektions‐
moleküle  vorgestellt.  Affinitätsselektionen  von  Phagen‐Display‐Bibliotheken  gegen 
infektiöse  Vaccinia‐Virus‐Partikel  führten  zur  erfolgreichen  Anreicherung  von  17 
wiederkehrenden  Peptidsequenzen,  was  auf  eine  Anreicherung  von  Pockenvirus‐
bindenden  Phagenklonen  hindeutet.  Nach  einer  Charakterisierung  dieser  17 den Klone, wurden drei Peptidsequenzen ausgewählt, synthetisiert und weiter 
charakterisiert.  Dabei  konnte  für  eins  dieser  drei  synthetischen  Peptide  eine  spezifi‐
sche  Bindung  an  Vaccinia‐Virus‐Partikel  gezeigt  werden.  Dies  demonstriert  die 
Eignung synthetischer Peptide für die Detektion von Bioterror‐Agenzien.  
  ‐ VI ‐  
Table of contents 
Acknowledgments....................................................................................................................................III
Declaration of Authorship.....................................................................................................................IV
Abstract..........................................................................................................................................................V
Zusammenfassung...................VI
1. Introduction.............................................................................................................................................1
1.1. Orthopoxviruses (OPVs)...................................................................................................................................1
1.1.1. Human‐pathogenic OPVs................................... 1
1.1.2. Virion structure ..................................................................................... 4
1.1.3. OPV genome ............................................................................................ 5
1.1.4. OPV proteome............................................ 8
1.2. OPV vaccines and vaccine candidates.........................................................................................................9
1.2.1. First generation vaccines................................................................... 9
1.2.2. Second‐generation vaccines...........................................................10
1.2.3. Third‐ and fourth‐generation vaccines......................................11
1.3. Immune response to an OPV infection .....................................12
1.3.1. Humoral immune response ...........................................................................................................................12
1.3.2. Cellular immune response ..............................................................13
1.4. Immunogenic OPV proteins ..........................................................14
1.5. Detection of OPVs..............................................................................14
1.5.1. BiGRUDI network......................................................................................................14
1.5.2. Non‐antibody‐based detection of pathogens..........................15
1.6. Library screenings for the advancement of OPV vaccine and detection molecule 
development ................................................................................................15
1.6.1. Bacteriophage  λ‐based expression libraries (ELs)..............................................................................16
1.6.2. Phage display of random peptide libraries.............................................................................................18
2. Aims of Study........................................................................................................................................22
3. Materials and Methods.....................................................................................................................23
3.1. Materials ..............................................................................................................................................................23
3.2. Cell culture ...........................................................................................28
3.2.1. Maintenance and subculture routine ........................................................................................................28
3.2.2. Cell preservation and recovery.....................................................28
3.3. Virus propagation..............................................................................29
3.3.1. Virus stock production .....................................................................29
3.3.2. Plaque assay .........................................................................................................................................................29
3.4. Preparation of genomic viral DNA for cloning .....................................................................................30
3.4.1. OPV propagation .................................................................................30
3.4.2. Purification of OPV particles ..........................................................30
3.4.3. Purifi viral genomic DNA ...............................................30
3.4.4. Quantification of extracted DNA with real‐time PCR ..........31
  ‐ VII ‐  Table of contents 
3.5. Construction of genomic OPV ELs .............................................................................................................32
3.5.1. Partial digestion of genomic DNA ................................................32
3.5.2. Size fractionation of partially digested DNA ...........................33
3.5.3. Ligation reaction .................................................................................33
3.5.4. Packaging reaction .............................................................................34
3.5.5. Amplification of the primary EL ..................................................................................................................34
3.6. Library validation..............................................................................34
3.6.1. Mathematical validation...................................................................34
3.6.2. Blue‐white screening.........................................................................35
3.7. Characterization of recombinant clones..................................35
3.7.1. Excision of the pBK‐CMV vector ..................................................................................................................35
3.7.2. Plasmid DNA isolation ......................................................................36
3.7.3. Restriction analysis............................................................................36
3.7.4. PCR amplification of insert DNA...................................................37
3.7.5. Sequencing of DNA inserts..............................................................38
3.7.6. Data processing...................................................................................................................................................38
3.8. Anti‐rA27 enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)..............................................................39
3.9. Serological screening of ELs .........................................................39
3.9.1. Immunofluorescence assay (IFA) ................................................40
3.9.2. Ethics statement ..................................................................................40
3.9.3. Primary antibody screening..........................................................................................................................40
3.9.4. Secondary screening procedure ...................................................42
3.10. Analysis of immunopositive plaques......................................43
3.11. Random peptide phage display libraries ..............................43
3.12. Bacterial strain maintenance and culture ...........................................................................................43
3.13. Phage titering ...................................................................................44
3.14. Identification of peptide ligands to infectious VACV particles....................................................44
3.14.1. Propagation and purification of VACV particles .................44
3.14.2. Biopanning against VACV particles ..........................................44
3.14.3. Amplification of binding phage clones...................................................................................................45
3.14.4. DNA sequencing of selected phage clones.............................46
3.14.5. Identification of consensus peptide sequences...................46
3.14.6. Phage ELISA.......................................................................................................................................................46
3.15. Peptide synthesis............................................................................46
3.16. Characterization of synthetic anti‐OPV peptide ligands by peptide ELISA ...........................47
4. Results....................................................................................................................................................48
4.1. Construction of primary genomic ELs .....................................................................................................48
4.2. Amplified ELs ......................................................................................50
4.3. Validation of the constructed ELs...............................................50
4.3.1. Restriction analysis............................................................................51
4.3.2. Sequencing of recombinant clones..............................................51
4.3.3. Control screenings.....................................................................................................55
4.4. Identification of immunoreactive proteins of VACV..........................................................................57
4.5. Identification of immunoreactive proteins of CPXV ...........58
4.6. DNA sequences contained in immunoreactive clones ......................................................................60
4.7. Genes encoding immunoreactive proteins are distributed genome‐wide ...............................61
  ‐ VIII ‐  Table of contents 
4.8. Cross‐reactive proteins of CPXV and VACV ...........................................................................................61
4.8.1. Cross‐reactive proteins of VACV and CPXV show wide functional diversity ...........................62
4.9. Identification of peptide ligands to infectious VACV particles ......................................................64
4.9.1. Identification of consensus peptide sequences......................64
4.9.2. Preliminary characterization of enriched phage clones with phage ELISA..............................66
4.10. Synthetic peptide ligands ...........................................................................................................................67
4.11. Peptide ELISA...................................................................................68
5. Discussion..............................................................................................................................................71
5.1. Recombinant vs. non‐recombinant titer of the constructed genomic ELs ...............................71
5.2. ELs with different insert size enable complete representation of viral sequences ..............72
5.3. DNA sequences found in recombinant phage clones.........................................................................73
5.4. Antigenicity of EL‐derived proteins..........................................................................................................74
5.5. Comparison of the bacteriophage‐based screening system to alternative methods for 
antigen discovery.......................................................................................75
5.6. Bacteriophage‐based ELs allow identification of antigenic, cross‐reactive proteins ..........77
5.6.1. Primary vs. boosted immune response sera ...........................77
5.6.2. Screening ELs with sera from different species....................................................................................78
5.7. Large parts of the OPV genome encode immunoreactive proteins .............................................78
5.8. Limitations for the identification of antigenic, cross‐reactive proteins by screening 
bacteriophage‐based ELs.......................................................................................................................................79
5.9. Relevance of identified cross‐reactive OPV proteins for subunit vaccine design..................79
5.9.1. Highly conserved proteins are best suited for subunit vaccine design ......................................80
5.9.2. Potential role of non‐membrane proteins in subunit vaccine development............................81
5.10. Techniques for improving binding properties of peptide ligands ............................................83
5.11. Synthetic peptides as surrogate antibodies for pathogen detection?......................................83
5.12. Implementing synthetic peptides for the detection of biothreat agents ................................85
5.13. Conclusions and perspectives ..................................................................................................................86
Abbreviations...........................................................................................................................................88
Figures.........................................................................................................................................................90
Tables.........................................................................................................................91
Formulas.....................................................................................................................................................91
References.................................................................................................................................................92
List of Publications...............................................................................................................................102
Conference and workshop participation......................................................................................103
 ‐ IX‐