Hawaiian legends of volcanoes (mythology) collected and translated from the Hawaiian

Hawaiian legends of volcanoes (mythology) collected and translated from the Hawaiian

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NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 3 3433 07954574 9 ( ^i-f^^.,w^ i:^Wfc-^Tfc-Ri^ %sk,^l vA^ p^4 ViesT^T V^i WAIIAN LEGE of VOLCANOES (MYTHOLOGY) Collected and Translated from the Hawaiian W. D. WESTERVELT AUTHO5, OF "legends of old HONOLULU," "LEGENDS OF >PH0STS GHOST-GODS," "LIFEAIJP OF KAMEHAMEHA," El ELLIS PRESS, BOSTON, MASS., U.S.A. ONSTAELE & CO., LONDON, G.B 1916 Copyright, 1916, by William Drake Westervelt Honolulu, T.H. YORKTHE MEW LIBRARYPUBLIC 782231 ANDLENOXASTOR, FOUNQATiONSTILDEN L1916R BOSTON. U.S.A. OFPRESS GEO. H. ELLIS CO. LONDON CONSTABLE & CO., LTD. Orange10 St., Leicester Sq., W.C. 1916 FOREWORD differ concerning theHowever doctors may into being, most ofway that our earth came early days meteoricthem agree that in its space flew together and producedbodies from globe than at present. Perhaps itsa hotter all covered with vast circular lakessurface was lava such as our telescopes reveal in greatof perfection, ring upon ring, over the surface of and pitsthe moon. On the moon these rings time when thenow cold, remnant from aare satellite were bub-gases from the inside of our internal heat supply andbling forth from a great slag which seethedbringing with them oceans of which formed sym-and swirled in circular pools ramparts of their own spatter.

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NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES
3 3433 07954574 9
(
^i-f^^.,w^
i:^Wfc-^Tfc-Ri^%sk,^l
vA^
p^4
ViesT^T V^iWAIIAN LEGE
of
VOLCANOES
(MYTHOLOGY)
Collected and Translated from the Hawaiian
W. D. WESTERVELT
AUTHO5, OF "legends of old HONOLULU," "LEGENDS OF >PH0STS
GHOST-GODS," "LIFEAIJP OF KAMEHAMEHA," El
ELLIS PRESS, BOSTON, MASS., U.S.A.
ONSTAELE & CO., LONDON, G.B
1916Copyright, 1916, by
William Drake Westervelt
Honolulu, T.H.
YORKTHE MEW
LIBRARYPUBLIC
782231
ANDLENOXASTOR,
FOUNQATiONSTILDEN
L1916R
BOSTON. U.S.A.
OFPRESS GEO. H. ELLIS CO.
LONDON
CONSTABLE & CO., LTD.
Orange10 St., Leicester Sq., W.C.
1916FOREWORD
differ concerning theHowever doctors may
into being, most ofway that our earth came
early days meteoricthem agree that in its
space flew together and producedbodies from
globe than at present. Perhaps itsa hotter
all covered with vast circular lakessurface was
lava such as our telescopes reveal in greatof
perfection, ring upon ring, over the surface of
and pitsthe moon. On the moon these rings
time when thenow cold, remnant from aare
satellite were bub-gases from the inside of our
internal heat supply andbling forth from a great
slag which seethedbringing with them oceans of
which formed sym-and swirled in circular pools
ramparts of their own spatter.metrically within
is without traces of similarThe earth not
curvedcircular ramparts in the shape of long
whichchains of volcanoes, mostly in the sea,
were to drywould appear as ridges if the ocean
Hawaiian Islands from Kauaiup. The line of the
the large island of Hawaii isto Mauna Loa on
now of enormous heightsuch a curved ridge,iv FOREWORD
but perhapsabove the bottom of the Pacific,
time much lower and more extendedat one
into something Uke a circle. These islands
built overflows of lavaappear to have been by
curved crack which followed along thefrom a
smoke-cracksold rampart, just as we now find
small ramparts which restrain thealong the
Kilauea.lavas in Halemaumau in the pit ofhot
this crack appears toThe last activity along
moved slowly through thousands of yearshave
mountainfrom west to east, and each volcanic
stopper to force the liquidthat was built made a
finallythe crack farther eastward untilout along
and Kilauea,two live volcanoes, Mauna Loa
extreme east end, still spoutingwere left at the
the liquid and building up domes.out
that the molten liquid,Somemen of science say
mostly an iron-stained glass, foamywhich is
fromwith the intensely hot gases which escape
earth, comes from an underthe inside of the
earth,the outer crust of thelayer beneath
if we wentwhich would be found anywhere
Others say that it comesdown deep enough.
under a stiffscattered pockets of liquidfrom
inner globe. Howevershell and over a stiffer
thatthere is some agreementthis may be,
come is aboutdepth from which the liquidsthe
quantitiesknow that vastseventy miles and we
the gasesescape with them. Possiblyof gas