ACTL phonology tutorial 1

ACTL phonology tutorial 1

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ACTL phonology tutorial 1Wouter Jansenwouter.jansen@kuvik.nethttp://wouter.jansen.kuvik.netNovember 14, 2004ACTL phonology tutorial 1 – November 14, 2004Today’s motto“[T]here are significant generalizations to be madeabout assimilation and [...] the formulation ofthese generalizations and their incorporation intophonological metatheory represent promising objectivesfor research.” (Schachter 1969:355)ACTL phonology tutorial 1 – November 14, 2004 1uRecap of 15 10Two conceptions of the phonology phonetics interface:1. A traditional model: Modified Extended StandardModularization (MESM)2. An alternative: a sinlge module covers both phonologyand phoneticsACTL phonology tutorial 1 – November 14, 2004 2uuuuMESMPhonological representations and rules stated in terms ofcategorical featuresSingle underlying forms for (most) output allophones andallomorphsPhonological representations are converted into scalarphonetic features at the phonology phonetics interfaceLinguistic phonetics responsible for ‘low level’ post processing and interfaces with peripheral auditory andarticulaory systemsACTL phonology tutorial 1 – November 14, 2004 3MESMDiscretely valued Phonologyfeature structures(Linguistic) Continuously valued phonetics feature structuresCochlear/articulatorymechanicsSpeech soundsACTL phonology tutorial 1 – November 14, 2004 4uuAn alternativeAll representations and rules stated in terms of finephonetic detailAllophones and ...

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ACTL phonology tutorial 1
Wouter Jansen
wouter.jansen@kuvik.net
http://wouter.jansen.kuvik.net
November 14, 2004
ACTL phonology tutorial 1 – November 14, 2004Today’s motto
“[T]here are significant generalizations to be made
about assimilation and [...] the formulation of
these generalizations and their incorporation into
phonological metatheory represent promising objectives
for research.” (Schachter 1969:355)
ACTL phonology tutorial 1 – November 14, 2004 1u
Recap of 15 10
Two conceptions of the phonology phonetics interface:
1. A traditional model: Modified Extended Standard
Modularization (MESM)
2. An alternative: a sinlge module covers both phonology
and phonetics
ACTL phonology tutorial 1 – November 14, 2004 2u
u
u
u
MESM
Phonological representations and rules stated in terms of
categorical features
Single underlying forms for (most) output allophones and
allomorphs
Phonological representations are converted into scalar
phonetic features at the phonology phonetics interface
Linguistic phonetics responsible for ‘low level’ post
processing and interfaces with peripheral auditory and
articulaory systems
ACTL phonology tutorial 1 – November 14, 2004 3MESM
Discretely valued
Phonology
feature structures
(Linguistic) Continuously valued
phonetics feature structures
Cochlear/
articulatory
mechanics
Speech sounds
ACTL phonology tutorial 1 – November 14, 2004 4u
u
An alternative
All representations and rules stated in terms of fine
phonetic detail
Allophones and allomorphs are stored in the lexicon and
may interfere during production and perception
ACTL phonology tutorial 1 – November 14, 2004 5An alternative
‘Phonetic Continuously valued
grammar’ feature structures
Cochlear/
articulatory
mechanics
Speech sounds
ACTL phonology tutorial 1 – November 14, 2004 6u
u
An alternative
The alternative model has been developed in part as a
result of a more detailed understanding of:
1. The phonetic manifestation of phonological rules: e.g.,
incomplete neutralisation
2. The nature of ‘low level’ phonetic processes
Case studies: Hungarian and English RVA
ACTL phonology tutorial 1 – November 14, 2004 7u
u
u
Previous observations: Hungarian
Hungarian is a language with [voice] symmetric (neutralising)
´RVA (Vago, 1980; Kenesei et al., 1998; Siptar &
¨Torkenczy, 2000)
/fy:c/+ /bOn/ [fy:ébEn] ‘in (a) whistle’
/se:p/+ /zEne:s/ [se:bzEne:s] ‘beautiful musician’
/rOb/+ /to:l/ [rOpto:l] ‘from (a) prisoner’
/hOb/+ /sifon/ [hOpsifon] ‘cream maker’
ACTL phonology tutorial 1 – November 14, 2004 8u
v
v
v
Previous observations: English
RVA is at best a low level phonetic process, triggered
almost exclusively by [ voice] obstruents:
Jones (1956); Gimson (1994): RVA to lenis obstruents
is typical L2 (French, Dutch) ‘error’
Gimson (1994): English [+voice] fricatives devoice
before a [ voice] obstruents in ‘close knit’ combinations.
Vowel length rarely affected
Haggard (1978); Stevens et al. (1992); Smith (1996)
English [+voice] fricatives are subject to (partial)
devoicing across contexts, especially after another ([
voice]) obstruent and utterance finally
ACTL phonology tutorial 1 – November 14, 2004 9