Dead Kennedys
190 pages
English

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris

Dead Kennedys , livre ebook

-

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus
190 pages
English

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus

Description

Dead Kennedys routinely top both critic and fan polls as the greatest punk band of their generation. Their debut full-length, Fresh Fruit for Rotting Vegetables, in particular, is regularly voted among the top albums in the genre. Fresh Fruit offered a perfect hybrid of humor and polemic strapped to a musical chassis that was as tetchy and inventive as Jello Biafra’s withering broadsides. Those lyrics, cruel in their precision, were revelatory. But it wouldn’t have worked if the underlying sonics were not such an uproarious rush, the paraffin to Biafra’s naked flame.


Dead Kennedys’ continuing influence is an extraordinary achievement for a band that had practically zero radio play and only released records on independent labels. They not only existed outside of the mainstream but were, as V. Vale of Search and Destroy noted, the first band of their stature to turn on and attack the music industry itself. The DKs set so much in motion. They were integral to the formulation of an alternative network that allowed bands on the first rung of the ladder to tour outside of their own backyard. They were instrumental in supporting the concept of all-ages shows and spurned the advances of corporate rock promoters and industry lapdogs. They legitimized the notion of an American punk band touring internationally while disseminating the true horror of their native country’s foreign policies, effectively serving as anti-ambassadors on their travels.


The book uses dozens of first-hand interviews, photos, and original artwork to offer a new perspective on a group who would become mired in controversy almost from the get-go. It applauds the band’s key role in transforming punk rhetoric, both polemical and musical, into something genuinely threatening—and enormously funny. The author offers context in terms of both the global and local trajectory of punk and, while not flinching from the wildly differing takes individual band members have on the evolution of the band, attempts to be celebratory—if not uncritical.


Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 01 juillet 2014
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9781604869873
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 1 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0025€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Exrait

Dead Kennedys: Fresh Fruit for Rotting Vegetables, The Early Years
Alex Ogg © 2014
This edition © 2014 PM Press
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be transmitted by any means without permission in writing from the publisher.
ISBN: 978-1-60486-489-2
LCCN: 2013956920
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
PM Press
P.O. Box 23912
Oakland, CA 94623
Book design by Russ Bestley • www.hitsvilleuk.com
Front cover design by John Yates • www.stealworks.com
DK Photographs (where specified) © Ruby Ray, Mick McGee
Fallout magazine © Winston Smith • www.winstonsmith.com
Printed in the USA by the Employee Owners of Thomson-Shore in Dexter, Michigan www.thomsonshore.com
Acknowledgements
The author would like to dedicate this book to Dawn Nichola Wrench – ‘Never TDTF’
He also thanks the staff and students at Brittons and in particular 10ad/en1 for contract-checking and 8OGG, his day job treasures.
Jello’s support for this project was crucial in seeing it finally reach print, but the author also acknowledges the contributions made by his fellow band members when the project existed in a different guise. The author would also like to thank his favourite collage artist, Winston Smith, for his support and involvement in this project. Others who were vital to the development of the book included all those interviewed, and special thanks to Russ Bestley (design), Roger Sabin, Vanessa Demaude and Josef Loderer (for advice and encouragement), Helen Donlon (his fab literary agent), Mick McGee and Ruby Ray (for photos). Thanks also to DK record and memorabilia specialists Tony Raven, Mason Bermingham, Andrew Kenrick, Iain Scatterty, Vaughan Wyn Roberts, Darren Hardcastle, Kevin Shepherd and Rich Hassall for rare record cover details and images, and to Jay Allen Sanford of Rock ‘n’ Roll Comics. Vasilia Dimitrova brought her illustration skills to bear to highlight an essential part of the story, and thanks to Allan Kausch for initial editing and feedback, together with early gig flyers and information, and Gregory Nipper for an extremely detailed final edit. Thanks too to co-publishers Kristiina in Finland, Craig and Ramsey in America, Joachim in Germany, Maria in Brazil, David in the dear old UK and anyone who’s been forgotten!
Contents
Prequel: When Ya Get Drafted
Chapter 1: So You’ve Been to School for a Year or Two
Chapter 2: In a Desperate Mind, Little Gardens Grow
Chapter 3: You Will Jog for the Master Race
Chapter 4: Are You Believin’ the Morning Papers?
Chapter 5: Anyone Can Be King for a Day
Chapter 6: Efficiency and Progress Is Ours Once More
Chapter 7: Don’t Forget to Pack a Wife
All You Ever Do Is Complain, Yeah?
Endnotes
Yakety Yak
Grafic Anarchy

Book jacket collages by Winston Smith, 2013.
Prequel
When Ya Get Drafted
S ome of the interview material collated herein was originally commissioned as the basis for the projected sleeve notes to the twenty-fifth anniversary reissue of Fresh Fruit For Rotting Vegetables. The fact that said endeavour was derailed by wrangling among former members will come as no great surprise to longstanding observers of Dead Kennedys. The maxim is that history is dictated by the winners, whether said victory be defined by court case, fiscal arm-twisting, media access or variations on those themes. Efforts to maintain authorial independence on the project were undermined by warring factions competing over the narrative and in the end the sleeve notes were withdrawn. Or rather just tossed aside. The final stumbling block was a single sentence, which is retained in this book (you’ll struggle to spot it though, it’s astonishingly innocuous). It got very messy and at times deeply unpleasant. But it represents subject matter I was always committed to returning to. And it’s taken to the thirtieth anniversary, and beyond, to sort it all out.
It was a salutary lesson in how deep some feuds run, and yet I maintain that it was a tragic denouement to a job well worth undertaking. Informed readers will doubtless be aware how much the reputation of the band has been tarnished over recent years. To borrow San Francisco Chronicle writer James Sullivan’s analogy, any metaphysical statue the city might have erected in the band’s honour just got covered in seagull poop. Yet a great band they truly were. I am not alone in ranking Fresh Fruit as one of the most important albums to emerge from punk, one of only a handful that genuinely transcended genre – stretching musical and lyrical conventions while making a point, or several dozen, and jabbing funny bones the world over. This is an effort to restore its standing. Or hose off some of the guano.
In fact, the history of this project extends even deeper than the sleeve-note debacle. In 1991 I was editing a British music magazine to which someone submitted an article on the band. I was very keen to publish, and sent it off to Dead Kennedys’ singer Jello Biafra for evaluation and scrutiny. When he eventually replied there were over a hundred written amendments – he wasn’t too taken by the writer. He wasn’t all that impressed, either, when he discovered said magazine’s publisher had bootlegged DKs records in the past – a fact I was blissfully unaware of at the time. In the event the magazine disappeared down the tubes. In effect, then, what you are reading has spent two decades in gestation. That sounds overly grand; I’ve applied myself to the odd job in between.
Our correspondence continued, albeit sporadically, over the course of two decades. Thereafter I was commissioned to submit an article on the band for another music magazine, and a similar process of writing and revision was embarked upon. Unfortunately, at that precise moment the legal shenanigans between the former band-mates erupted and the piece was lost in the shuffle. Another few years rolled by and in 2005 I was asked to write the aforementioned sleeve notes. I was thrilled, naively thinking I could get around entrenched positions by playing fair and being transparent to all parties. I spent about a month working with the former members on new interviews and got some great material. Then it got to the nitty gritty and pretty soon I was trying to mediate various issues, showing each party the other’s replies and attempting to reconcile what could broadly, and generously, be described as competing takes on history.
The opposing parties by this point had diluted to Biafra versus guitarist East Bay Ray, which again will not be a surprising revelation to those who know something of the band’s internal politics. Klaus Flouride (bass) very much follows Ray’s lead in inter-band affairs and Ted, in charmingly typical drummer-like fashion, seemed completely bemused as to why anyone would wish to bother. I was pretty close to coming round to his way of thinking by the end.
Petty just doesn’t cover it. The ten drafts wound up running to over sixty-four thousand words; we had space for five thousand. At one stage an employee at Alternative Tentacles (Dead Kennedys’ record label subsequently administered by Biafra) complained that I’d single-handedly broken their printer. There was a lengthy telephone debate on whether to allow a band member the use of the personal rather than collective pronoun. As part of my increasingly desperate attempts at appeasement, I ended up totting up quote allocations to prove that everyone’s thoughts were evenly accounted for. 1 If the men in white coats had knocked at my door at this stage, I would have gone quietly. The absolute nadir was when one band member – not Biafra – accused me of being the cause of his bad back. Over a transatlantic phone call. Repeatedly.
In the end it ran something like this. Biafra will chide and cajole and do his utmost to persuade you of the veracity of his interpretation of events. Then he will concede that you have the right to call it as you see it as a writer. Ray will chide and cajole and do his utmost to persuade you of the veracity of his interpretation of events. And then he will call his lawyer. The curse of the Kennedys? I must admit I am finalising the current manuscript with more than vague apprehension. What else could possibly go wrong?
For all that, I still adore the record. Fresh Fruit For Rotting Vegetables is not London Calling. It is not Never Mind The Bollocks, nor is it The Ramones. To me, it is superior to that lauded trio, mainly because of the lyrical and musical intelligence that underpins it, which utterly captivated and compelled back in 1980, scarily three decades ago. I could support this doubtless hysterical contention by pointing out that it regularly features in greatest punk album polls voted for by the people (though it should be noted that the people are a stupid bunch, by and large, as Sid Vicious once set out in rather more florid terms). The album’s afterlife is such an extraordinary achievement for a band who had practically zero radio play and only released records on independent labels – no EMI, CBS or Warners for them. They not only existed outside of the mainstream but were, as V. Vale of Search And Destroy fanzine noted, the first band of their stature to turn on and attack the music industry itself. The DKs set so much in motion. They were integral to the formulation of an alternative American network that allowed bands on the first rung of the ladder to tour outside of their own backyard. They were instrumental in supporting the concept of all-ages shows and spurned the advances of corporate rock promoters and industry lapdogs. They legitimised the whole notion of an American punk band working successfully in the UK and Europe while disseminating the true horror of their native country’s foreign policies; effectively serving as anti-ambass

  • Accueil Accueil
  • Univers Univers
  • Ebooks Ebooks
  • Livres audio Livres audio
  • Presse Presse
  • BD BD
  • Documents Documents