Intimacy, Performance, and the Lied in the Early Nineteenth Century
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161 pages
English

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Description

The German lied, or art song, is considered one of the most intimate of all musical genres—often focused on the poetic speaker's inner world and best suited for private and semi-private performance in the home or salon. Yet, problematically, any sense of inwardness in lieder depends on outward expression through performance.


With this paradox at its heart, Intimacy, Performance, and the Lied in the Early Nineteenth Century explores the relationships between early nineteenth-century theories of the inward self, the performance practices surrounding inward lyric poetry and song, and the larger conventions determining the place of intimate poetry and song in the public concert hall. Jennifer Ronyak studies the cultural practices surrounding lieder performances in northern and central Germany in the first quarter of the nineteenth century, demonstrating how presentations of lieder during the formative years of the genre put pressure on their sense of interiority. She examines how musicians responded to public concern that outward expression would leave the interiority of the poet, the song, or the performer unguarded and susceptible to danger. Through this rich performative paradox Ronyak reveals how a song maintains its powerful intimacy even during its inherently public performance.


Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations
Introduction
1. Safeguarding the Self
2. Breathing Subjectivity
3. Serious Play in the Salon
4. The Poetic Public Sphere
5. Lieder in an Aria's Clothing
6. Mignon as Public Property
Epilogue
Bibliography
Index

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Date de parution 10 septembre 2018
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9780253035790
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 1 Mo

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INTIMACY, PERFORMANCE, AND THE LIED IN THE EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY
HISTORICAL PERFORMANCE
Dana Marsh, Editor
INTIMACY, PERFORMANCE, AND THE LIED IN THE EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY
Jennifer Ronyak
Indiana University Press
This book is a publication of
Indiana University Press
Office of Scholarly Publishing
Herman B Wells Library 350
1320 East 10th Street
Bloomington, Indiana 47405 USA
iupress.indiana.edu
© 2018 by Jennifer Ronyak
All rights reserved
No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. The Association of American University Presses’ Resolution on Permissions constitutes the only exception to this prohibition.
Manufactured in the United States of America
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Names: Ronyak, Jennifer, author.
Title: Intimacy, performance, and the Lied in the early nineteenth century / Jennifer Ronyak.
Description: Bloomington : Indiana University Press, 2018. | Series: Historical performance
Identifiers: LCCN 2018019395 (print) | LCCN 2018025312 (ebook) | ISBN 9780253035806 (e-book) | ISBN 9780253035776 (cl : alk. paper) | ISBN 9780253035769 (pb : alk. paper)
Subjects: LCSH: Songs—Germany—History and criticism. | Music—Germany—19th century—History and criticism.
Classification: LCC ML1629.4 (ebook) | LCC ML1629.4 .R55 2018 (print) | DDC 782.421680943/09034—dc23
LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2018019395
Publication of this book was supported by the AMS 75 PAYS Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.
1 2 3 4 5 23 22 21 20 19 18
For Mark, who loves lieder
Contents
Acknowledgments
List of Abbreviations
Introduction
1 Safeguarding the Self
2 Breathing Subjectivity
3 Serious Play in the Salon
4 The Poetic Public Sphere
5 Lieder in an Aria’s Clothing
6 Mignon as Public Property
Epilogue
Bibliography
Index
Acknowledgments
T HIS BOOK WOULD not be possible without the many intimate exchanges, moments of formative sociability, and public events and institutions that underlie it. I received financial support from the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst, the American Association of University Women, the Izaak Walton Killam Foundation, the Thomas Hampson Fund of the American Musicological Society, and the University of Texas at Arlington’s Research Enhancement Program, Charles T. McDowell Center, and College of Liberal Arts. The final publication of this book was also made possible by the AMS 75 PAYS Endowment of the American Musicological Society, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; the Kunstuniversität Graz assisted me with costs as well. Numerous helpful archivists and additional staff at the following institutions also made this project possible: the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin (Preussische Kulturbesitz); the Goethe und Schiller Archiv in Weimar (Klassik Stiftung Weimar); the Stadtgeschichtliches Museum Leipzig; and the Stadtarchiv Leipzig. I especially wish to thank the staff members at the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin who rescanned a number of sources for me after my flash drive went missing on the streets of Berlin. Marco Kuhn at the Stadtgeschichtliches Museum Leipzig also made sure I did not get lost on my hurried way to find sources that, at the last minute, were discovered to have been relocated across town.
My work also benefitted from the ongoing input of mentors, colleagues, and friends who engaged in supportive acts of sociability in person and on the page. Holly Watkins and David Gramit provided wise and witty mentorship and feedback. Celia Applegate, Hermann Danuser, Mary Ann Smart, and Fred Maus offered sharp insights and additional support at crucial moments in the progress of this work. Laura Tunbridge has provided invaluable guidance concerning the final form of this manuscript, and a number of my earlier ideas came to full fruition with the input of Berthold Hoeckner and Nicholas Mathew.
I also wish to thank the many close colleagues and friends who read earlier and later drafts of chapters, including Zoë Lang, Marie Sumner Lott, Martin Nedbal, Kira Thurman, Kristen Meyers Turner, Deidre Loughridge, and Alexander Stefaniak. A number of additional attendees at conference presentations I gave at the National Meeting of the American Musicological Society, the Biennial Conference on Nineteenth-Century Music, and the Biennial North American Conference on Nineteenth-Century Music also contributed to the improvement of my arguments.

Much of the discussion of past performances and performance ideals within this book is speculative. With respect to this aspect of my work, I am grateful to Benjamin Binder for the invitation to be faculty for the Song Scholarship and Performance Program at the Vancouver International Song Institute in June of 2014. There I was able to work with live performers concerning my claims. I was also inspired by the contributions of the students and faculty there. This second group included Cameron Stowe, Harald Krebs, Sharon Krebs, Susan Youens, Deborah Stein, Richard Kurth, and Jane K. Brown.
I was also supported in the task of bringing my private musings into the public sphere by mentors and colleagues who offered advice on the publishing process, including Ralph Locke and Heidi Hardt. Paul Posten and Joseph Jakubowski did expert work on the musical examples, Josh Rutner prepared the index with skill, and Janice Frisch shepherded this project to a successful conclusion. I am thankful to Amy Speier for many mornings spent writing and talking through things both personal and professional, to Samantha Inman, Rebecca Geoffrey-Schwinden, Peter Mondelli, George Chave, Scott Pool, Lorri Dow, and Vagner Whitehead for their ongoing support, and to Alexandra Monchick and Katherine Hutchings for their feedback and friendship. I am grateful for the unwavering support of my parents, David and Sharon Ronyak, and my brother, Jonathan.
In the years I have been thinking about intimacy in relationship to the lied, I have often come back to a short phrase I once found in a passage by Henry Miller: the idea that it is a “fugitive value,” a thing that slips from one’s grasp. While the exact location of intimacy in the sphere of lied performance may remain uncertain, however, it has not been so in my life. I am thankful for the love and support of my husband, Mark Maynor, for whom this concept has never been a mystery.
Several segments of chapters 1 and 3 appeared earlier in my article “‘Serious Play,’ Performance, and the Lied: The Stägemann Schöne Müllerin Revisited,” 19th-Century Music 34, no. 2 (2010): 141–67; this material is reworked with the kind permission of the University of California Press. Oxford University Press granted permission for the reuse of a portion of my article, ““Beethoven within Grasp: The Nineteenth-Century Reception of Adelaide ,” Music & Letters , 97, no. 2 (2016): 249–76, in chapter 5. Georg Olms Verlag has extended the permission to repurpose a portion of my earlier essay, “Anna Milder-Hauptmann’s ‘Favorite Lied’: The Domestic Side of a Monumental Simplicity,” Jahrbuch Musik und Gender 2013. Vol. 6. Liedersingen: Studien zur Aufführungsgeschichte des Liedes im 18. und 19. Jahrhundert , edited by Dr. Katharina Hottmann, 93–108, in chapter 4. Translations of German prose and poetry throughout this book are my own, unless otherwise indicated.
Abbreviations KGA Schleiermacher, Friedrich. Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher: Kritische Gesamtausgabe . Edited by Hans-Joachim Birkner et al. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 1984. MA Goethe, Johann Wolfgang. Sämtliche Werke nach Epochen seines Schaffens, Münchner Ausgabe . Edited by Karl Richter in conjunction with Hubert G. Göpfert, Norbert Miller, and Gerhard Sauder. Munich: C. Hanser, 1985–1998.
In the case of the following three periodicals, I frequently refer to correspondent reports and reviews that summarize multiple concerts. For example, correspondents for the Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung frequently summarized the musical activities in a city over a month or more. Local reviewers in Berlin’s Vossische Zeitung and Spener und Haude’sche Zeitung occasionally referred to very specific events, although they also sometimes simply titled their contributions “Music” or “Concert.” Given this frequently generalized coverage, I refer to specific reports and articles only in the endnotes and not separately in the bibliography. AmZ Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung . Various editors. Leipzig: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1798–1865. SH Spener und Haude’sche Zeitung . Shorthand for Berlinische Nachrichten von Staats- und gelehrten Sachen . Various editors. Berlin, 1740–1872. VZ Vossische Zeitung . Shorthand for Königlich Privilegierte Berlinische Zeitung von Staats- und gelehrten Sachen . Various editors. Berlin, 1721–1934.
INTIMACY, PERFORMANCE, AND THE LIED IN THE EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY
Introduction
I N A 2013 interview with Südwest Presse Online , baritone and acclaimed lied interpreter Christian Gerhaher reflected on the genre, which primarily consists of settings of German Romantic poetry for solo voice and piano. The inter

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