Jazzwomen
315 pages
English

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315 pages
English

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Description

Up close and personal interviews with women jazz artists


"Their conversations range far beyond the biographical—to their feelings, motivations, musical approaches, and attitudes. These women were obviously comfortable with their questioners. [Enstice and Stockhouse] came prepared, having delved deeply into the music and history of each, bringing them closer to the essence of each musician." —from the Preface by Cobi Narita and Paul Ash

"Jazzwomen includes many artists who are not covered in earlier books and also reveals new information about artists who are. In addition, the interview format used in Jazzwomen provides the reader with each artist's own words, permeated with a warmth and immediacy not typically found in author narratives. Jazzwomen is a much-needed book." —David N. Baker, Distinguished Professor of Music and Chairman, Jazz Department, Indiana University School of Music; and Artistic and Musical Director, Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra

Between 1995 and 2000, Wayne Enstice and Janis Stockhouse interviewed dozens of women jazz instrumentalists and vocalists. Jazzwomen collects 21 of the most fascinating interviews. The participants discuss everything—their personal lives, musical training and inspirations, recordings, relationships with other musicians, the music industry, sexism on the bandstand—and often make candid and revealing statements. At the end of each interview is a recommended discography compiled by the authors.

Every jazz listener, musician, teacher, and student will be captivated by interviews with Marian McPartland, Regina Carter, Abbey Lincoln, Cassandra Wilson, Diana Krall, and their peers. Includes a sampler CD with complete works by several of the artists, including Jane Ira Bloom and Ingrid Jensen.


Preface by Cobi Narita and Paul Ash
Introduction by Wayne Enstice
Jane Ira Bloom
JoAnne Brackeen
Clora Bryant
Terri Lyne Carrington
Regina Carter
Marilyn Crispell
Barbara Dennerlein
Dottie Dodgion
Shirley Horn
Ingrid Jensen
Sheila Jordan
Diana Krall
Abbey Lincoln
Virginia Mayhew
Marian McPartland
Helen Merrill
Maria Schneider
Shirley Scott
Carol Sloane
Teri Thornton
Cassandra Wilson
Bibliography
Index

CD contents:
BLOOM - "Always Hope"
BRACKEEN - "Cram 'N Exam"
CARRINGTON - "Giggles"
CRISPELL - "Collage for Coltrane #1"
DENNERLEIN - "Jimmy's Walk"
JENSEN - "Woodcarvings"
JORDAN - "The Crossing"
MAYHEW - "Apple Flambe"
McPARTLAND - "Twilight World"
THORNTON - "Knee Deep in the Blues"

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 25 mai 2004
Nombre de lectures 2
EAN13 9780253010148
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 1 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,1050€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Exrait

JAZZWOMEN
JAZZWOMEN
CONVERSATIONS WITH TWENTY-ONE MUSICIANS
Profiles in Popular Music
Jeffrey Magee and Glenn Gass, co-editors




Wayne Enstice and Janis Stockhouse
Preface by Cobi Narita and Paul Ash
Indiana University Press | Bloomington and Indianapolis
This book is a publication of
Indiana University Press
601 North Morton Street
Bloomington, IN 47404-3797 USA
http://iupress.indiana.edu
Telephone orders 800-842-6796
Fax orders 812-855-7931
Orders by e-mail iuporder@indiana.edu
2004 by Wayne Enstice and Janis Stockhouse
All rights reserved
No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. The Association of American University Presses Resolution on Permissions constitutes the only exception to this prohibition.
The paper used in this publication meets the minimum requirements of American National Standard for Information Sciences-Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Materials, ANSI Z39.48-1984.
Manufactured in the United States of America
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Enstice, Wayne, date
Jazzwomen : conversations with twenty-one musicians / Wayne Enstice and Janis Stockhouse ; preface by Cobi Narita and Paul Ash.
p. cm. - (Profiles in popular music)
Includes bibliographical references (p. ), selected discographies, and index.
ISBN 0-253-34436-0 (cloth : alk. paper)
1. Women jazz musicians-Interviews. I. Stockhouse, Janis, date II. Title. III. Series.
ML395.E572 2004
781.65 092 273-dc22
2003022615
1 2 3 4 5 09 08 07 06 05 04
Dedicated to
Eleanor Enstice
for her unconditional love.
CONTENTS
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Notes on the Selected Discographies

Jane Ira Bloom
JoAnne Brackeen
Clora Bryant
Terri Lyne Carrington
Regina Carter
Marilyn Crispell
Barbara Dennerlein
Dottie Dodgion
Shirley Horn
Ingrid Jensen
Sheila Jordan
Diana Krall
Abbey Lincoln
Virginia Mayhew
Marian McPartland
Helen Merrill
Maria Schneider
Shirley Scott
Carol Sloane
Teri Thornton
Cassandra Wilson
Suggestions for Further Reading
Index
Preface
I believe I was invited to write this preface because of my own work on behalf of women in the music, as producer, advisor, fan, and friend. But since Paul and I are like one, and he has worked on every project with me, Paul and I wrote this preface together.
We know almost all of the subjects as people, and appreciate how Wayne and Janis managed to reach even the most private of them. Their conversations range far beyond the biographical-to their feelings, motivations, musical approaches, and attitudes. These women were obviously comfortable with their questioners. Wayne and Janis came prepared, having delved deeply into the music and history of each, bringing them closer to the essence of each musician.
The twenty-one portraits, arranged alphabetically-a great diplomatic concept-go beyond the usual suspects of the popular singers and pianists. There are enough instrumentalists to make a swinging band. Their ages and musical styles are wide-ranging, but Paul and I would pay anything to see them together on a stage.
The aspiring musician reader will learn about study, influences, and career moves. The social historian will gather more information of the glass ceiling, color barriers, and the musician s life. The casual reader will enjoy visits with twenty-one nice people, sitting comfortably in their homes, talking about their lives and their music.
Allow us to mention one interview in particular, that of Abbey Lincoln, my heart (Paul s, too). Abbey is so totally open in this interview, it s mind-boggling. Abbey is very frank about her attitudes and some very private thoughts on race, women s role in jazz, and other singers. (She is one of the strongest women I know.) This interview will be cited in every review of this book, and to me is worth the price of the entire volume. But then, so is every interview . . .

With love ,
Cobi Narita and Paul Ash
Nobuko Cobi Narita, Founder and President ,
Jazz Center of New York, Inc., and Universal Jazz
Coalition, Inc.; Founder and Past President ,
International Women in Jazz, Inc .
Paul Ash, President, Sam Ash Music Stores
Acknowledgments
To succeed, jazz bands depend on a cooperative spirit dedicated to a common vision. A similar sense of community underscored the realization of this book, as a constellation of colleagues, associates, friends, and family members have shored and shepherded us over the eight-year stretch this project took to complete. Foremost among them are the musicians who generously consented to be interviewed. Our indebtedness only deepened each time the need surfaced for yet another lengthy session to iron out knotty historical or narrative problems. In addition to their gifts of time and gracious receptivity, gratitude of the highest order is extended to them for the inspired music they make, which sustained and centered this endeavor.
It makes eminent good sense that Nobuko Cobi Narita, among the most indefatigable of advocates for jazz and its players, made contributions to this volume that are second only to the musicians in their importance. Cobi was an invaluable resource as we conducted field research. She continues to be a trusted advisor, and on occasion she has assumed on our behalf the improvised role of jazz diplomat. We are privileged to have the preface she composed with Paul Ash inaugurate our book. We are beholden to Marie Enstice, who had our welfare quite literally at her fingertips as she painstakingly transcribed countless hours of recorded interviews. On the home front, especially when the pitch of frustration was elevated, her influence was never less than salutary. Our special thanks as well for research and development grants from the University of Cincinnati, University Research Council, and the Lilly Foundation in Indianapolis.
We would be remiss not to single out several additional principals who played a key role. David Baker, Distinguished Professor of Music at Indiana University, was indispensable for his musical expertise and the constancy of encouragement he furnished. His colleague in the School of Music at Indiana University, Professor Patrick Harbison, was more than generous in his support of this project, and his discernment as an informal editor of selected portions of this book was greatly appreciated. We were very well served by Cephas Bowles, General Manager of WGBO-FM in Newark, New Jersey, as he repeatedly dipped into the deep pockets of his rolodex. We benefited enormously from Artists Representative Suzi Reynolds, who was a model of unselfish effort in her devotion to the career and legacy of Teri Thornton. Kirsten Inquilla is recognized for repeatedly opening her Bronx flat for two weary travelers. Timothy Enstice is advanced equal attention for trenchant editorial observations delivered with unvarnished clarity.
Many others were instrumental in their willingness to share pithy insights, timely information, pertinent counsel, or welcome amenities. They include Kendra Gjerdingen, Bloomington, Indiana attorney; William Hays, English teacher at Bloomington High School North; Jane Henson, Co-Director, ERIC Clearinghouse for Social Studies/Social Science Education; and Oscar Treadwell, Cincinnati-based jazz historian.
Finally, we could not envision undertaking the final phases of this project without the editorial team assembled at Indiana University Press, led by Music Editor Gayle Sherwood. The relish with which they have conducted the publication process, from their ambitious vision for the uses and dissemination of this work to the professional attention they have lavished on the manuscript at each stage of production, has been of inestimable value in confirming for us the worthiness of our original conception.
Introduction
Am I in it? jazz pianist Dorothy Donegan asked beseechingly.
Enthralled by Ms. Donegan s performance at the Jazz Showcase in Chicago, I decided between sets to ask her to sign my special copy of the book I had co-authored, Jazz Spoken Here . 1 This was my jazz memorabilia copy. I had dozens of signatures and courtesy notes, not only from musicians who were in the book, but also from many who were not-the result of repeated occasions of this sort when a jazz concert inspired me to seek a memento.
I walked across the darkened room to the table where Dorothy Donegan was seated and made my request. It was then that she put that question to me-a question, I must admit, that disconcerted me because of the endearing, almost plaintive way this diminutive seventy-something musician asked it. I made an effort to gracefully extricate myself, but with the excitement from her first set still palpable in the room, my attempt at an explanation rang hollow. Seemingly unfazed, Dorothy Donegan listened politely and then graced the flyleaf with her signature.
That uncomfortable incident lingered with me beyond that evening in Chicago, because it reawakened an issue I thought had been put to rest. Jazz Spoken Here is a book I am proud of, and yet there was one characteristic of it that, in retrospect, I wish I could have modified: the exclusive focus on men. That shortcoming was a matter of chance. The book collected interviews with well-known musicians who performed in Arizona from 19

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