Summary of Martin Middlebrook s The Falklands War
60 pages
English

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60 pages
English

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Description

Please note: This is a companion version & not the original book.
Sample Book Insights:
#1 The Argentinian invasion of the Falkland Islands began on 2 April 1982, with the invasion of Mullet Creek. The Argentinians were met by British troops, who surrendered after five hours of fighting. 67 Royal Marines and 11 members of the Royal Navy were captured.
#2 The Falklands are a temperate climate with little rainfall, but strong winds. The islands are treeless, and there is nothing to break the wind. When the weather clears, the scenery is beautiful.
#3 The Falkland Islands were a British colony, and life there was never idyllic. The economy relied on food imports, and the population was steadily declining. The only source of income was the philatelic industry, which received a huge boost with the war.
#4 The Falklands are a sheep-farming community outside Stanley. The locals do not like the term Port Stanley, so often used in the press, because the true name is simply Stanley. The Falkland Islands Company owns nearly half of the islands.

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 01 mai 2022
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9781669398288
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 1 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0150€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

Insights on Martin Middlebrook's The Falklands War
Contents Insights from Chapter 1 Insights from Chapter 2 Insights from Chapter 3 Insights from Chapter 4 Insights from Chapter 5 Insights from Chapter 6 Insights from Chapter 7 Insights from Chapter 8 Insights from Chapter 9 Insights from Chapter 10 Insights from Chapter 11 Insights from Chapter 12 Insights from Chapter 13 Insights from Chapter 14 Insights from Chapter 15 Insights from Chapter 16 Insights from Chapter 17 Insights from Chapter 18 Insights from Chapter 19 Insights from Chapter 20 Insights from Chapter 21 Insights from Chapter 22
Insights from Chapter 1



#1

The Argentinian invasion of the Falkland Islands began on 2 April 1982, with the invasion of Mullet Creek. The Argentinians were met by British troops, who surrendered after five hours of fighting. 67 Royal Marines and 11 members of the Royal Navy were captured.

#2

The Falklands are a temperate climate with little rainfall, but strong winds. The islands are treeless, and there is nothing to break the wind. When the weather clears, the scenery is beautiful.

#3

The Falkland Islands were a British colony, and life there was never idyllic. The economy relied on food imports, and the population was steadily declining. The only source of income was the philatelic industry, which received a huge boost with the war.

#4

The Falklands are a sheep-farming community outside Stanley. The locals do not like the term Port Stanley, so often used in the press, because the true name is simply Stanley. The Falkland Islands Company owns nearly half of the islands.

#5

The heart of each property is the settlement, and the names of some of the settlements are now part of Britain’s military history. The life in the Falklands is one of stultifying boredom for the women, and few young men are willing to accept the life-style.

#6

The Falkland Islands are a backward and declining economy, with a falling population and few natural leaders. But there is a quality in the islands that should not be overlooked. The people are quiet and slow of speech. They are fanatically pro-British.

#7

The claim to sovereignty over the Falklands is held by the people of Argentina with passionate and unswerving intensity. A timetable of events may help to understand that passion. In 1540, the islands were uninhabited and undiscovered. In 1592, a British ship landed in the islands and named the passage between the two main islands Falkland Sound after Viscount Falkland, Treasurer of the Navy.

#8

The French settlement of Malouines was handed over to the Spanish on payment of a sum of money to compensate de Bougainville for his expense. The main east island was named Isla Soledad and the west island Isla Gran Malvina. A Spanish governor took up residence at Port Louis, which was renamed Puerto Soledad.

#9

The Argentinian claim to the Falkland Islands was based on their inheritance of the sovereignty for the whole of the former Spanish La Plata Royalty. They point out that other former Spanish colonies have been able to keep their offshore islands.

#10

The South Georgia Islands are a group of small volcanic islands south of South Georgia, claimed by Britain because of Captain Cook’s voyage in 1775. The climate is Antarctic in nature with much packed ice and constant westerly storms. By all reasonable standards, they are uninhabitable and no British presence was ever established.

#11

The British Antarctic Territory is a large segment of Antarctica that is claimed by Britain. The basis for this claim is early British exploration work from 1820 onwards and long-established scientific stations on the peninsula known as Palmer Land and Graham Land.

#12

The Falklands were not inhabited by a group of people who wanted to get out from under white rule. The Falklanders were white, and their elected representatives repeatedly declared that they wished to remain a colony of Britain.

#13

The British and Argentinians continued to negotiate in 1966, but they were unable to come to a resolution. The British were bound by the wishes of the Falkland Islanders, and the Argentinians were unable to obtain much sympathy from the rest of the world because a transfer of the Falklands to their rule would result in an even worse form of colonialism.

#14

The Falkland Islands were becoming more and more dependent on the Argentinian mainland for things like air service, freight service, and teachers. Falkland Islanders realized that their future depended on this growing cooperation.

#15

The situation in 1982 was that the Argentinian flag flew over the eastern part of the chain of islands, and in the west on Tierra del Fuego. The British flag flew over the Falklands and South Georgia.

#16

The Falkland Islands are worth watching as they may contain the world’s last reserves of oil and minerals. If the Antarctic Treaty should ever collapse, whoever controls the Falklands, South Georgia, and the South Sandwiches will be in a commanding position over that area.
Insights from Chapter 2



#1

The war started because of the actions of three men: President Leopoldo Galtieri, Admiral Jorge Anaya, and Señor Constantino Davidoff. The military had been able to establish a political stability of sorts, but only by using savage repression against those who opposed them.

#2

Galtieri announced that 1982 would be the year of the Malvinas. He and the Argentinian navy believed that Britain would not mount a major naval and military expeditionary force to repossess the Falklands, and that the United States would remain neutral in the affair.

#3

On March 19, four British Antarctic Survey scientists reported that an Argentinian flag was flying at the old whaling station of Leith. The Argentinians had broken two British regulations: they had not obtained permission to land from the leader of the resident British survey party, who also doubled as immigration officer, and their men were carrying arms and firing shots at wild reindeer for meat.

#4

The British government advised Argentina that the Bahía Buen Suceso, which was still in the area, could call back at Leith and remove the workmen. If this did not happen, Endurance would do so.

#5

The Argentinian Navy was in charge of the capture of the Falklands. They had three groups of ships that were at sea since 28 March, ostensibly doing joint exercises with the Uruguayan Navy. The landings, Operation Azul, could be launched in the early hours of 1 April if all went well.

#6

The landing force was composed of the well-trained Amphibious Commando Company and the 2nd Marine Infantry Battalion. The Buzo Táctico would land first and attempt to capture Government House and the Royal Marine barracks at Moody Brook.

#7

The British landing force took five days to sail from Puerto Belgrano. The voyage did not go entirely to plan. The intended route around the Falklands was abandoned because of fierce weather, which reduced speed at one time to 6 knots.

#8

The initial briefing was given to the men. The marines were given instructions to block the runway with vehicles and any other obstacles available. The governor called a conference, and the civil officials were given instructions to destroy certain documents.

#9

The night passed, and the waiting continued. The Governor ordered the volunteers to report to their drill halls, and the marines were ferried to their positions by lorry.

#10

The Stanley radio station received a broadcast from the Argentinian flagship appealing for a peaceful surrender, but this was refused. The men of the Commando Company had come across the ground south of Stanley undetected and then split into two groups, intending to attack any Royal Marines at Moody Brook and capture Government House in simultaneous operations. But the Argentinians at Moody Brook were attacked first.

#11

The Argentinian commandos launched an attack on Government House at 6:15 a. m. The firing died down just before 7 a. The Argentinians were clearly waiting for more forces to arrive before launching another assault.

#12

The fighting continued to spread throughout Stanley. The Argentinians began to deploy from the damaged Amtrac and take up positions for a fire-fight, but no one ever saw any survivors emerge.

#13

The British secured Stanley after the town of Port Stanley had been evacuated. A small Argentinian landing craft came through The Narrows into Stanley Harbor. Five Royal Marines were patiently manning their position on the western side of the 250-yard wide entrance. Marine Rick Overall let fly with his Carl Gustav and the round went straight through the side of the landing craft, which soon sank.

#14

The end of Government House was approaching. The Argentinians were being reinforced, and the British were surrendering at several places in Stanley. The Argentinians were allowed to report the death of Captain Giachino, a national hero, but the other Argentinian casualties were not announced.

#15

The surrender of the Argentinian forces in the Falklands was met with relief by the citizens of Stanley. They had been occupation force, and they were glad to have them gone. The Argentine troops were sorted out, and the Air Force carried out a fly-past.

#16

All people are to remain at home until further notice. All infringements will be treated according to what is stated in EDICT NO 1. All further instructions will be released through the local broadcasting station, which will remain in operation.

#17

The Governor notifies the population that he will uphold the principles of the National Constitution and the customs and traditions of the Argentine people. He guarantees the continuity of the way of life of the people of the Islands, freedom of worship, respect for private property, freedom of labor, and normal supply situation.

#18

The first day of the invasion, m

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