Doctor Grimshawe s Secret — a Romance
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English

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218 pages
English

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Description

"Doctor Grimshawe's Secret — a Romance" by Nathaniel Hawthorne is an English romantic novel from his own encounters in England during 1853 to 1858.

Trajectory presents classics of world literature with 21st century features! Our original-text editions include the following visual enhancements to foster a deeper understanding of the work: Word Clouds at the start of each chapter highlight important words. Word, sentence, paragraph counts, and reading time help readers and teachers determine chapter complexity. Co-occurrence graphs depict character-to-character interactions as well character to place interactions. Sentiment indexes identify positive and negative trends in mood within each chapter. Frequency graphs help display the impact this book has had on popular culture since its original date of publication. Use Trajectory analytics to deepen comprehension, to provide a focus for discussions and writing assignments, and to engage new readers with some of the greatest stories ever told.

"Doctor Grimshawe's Secret — a Romance" by Nathaniel Hawthorne is an English romantic novel from his own encounters in England during 1853 to 1858.


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Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 01 octobre 2014
Nombre de lectures 4
EAN13 9781632098597
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 1 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0069€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Exrait

Doctor Grimshawe's Secret a Romance
Nathaniel Hawthorne

www.trajectory.com


TRAJECTORY CLASSICS Marblehead, Massachusetts

Copyright © 2014 Trajectory, Inc. ("Trajectory")All rights reserved for the images and illustrations created and added by Trajectory.The text of this book is in the public domain.This edition is designed and produced in Marblehead, Massachusetts by Trajectory.
For more information or permission to use or apply the illustrations within this book please contact info@trajectory.com .
Credits: Book and author descriptions provided by Freebase and/or Wikipedia. N-Gram statistics provided by Google.
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Table of Contents
Trajectory Introduction
PREFACE
CHAPTER I
CHAPTER II.
CHAPTER III.
CHAPTER IV. 
CHAPTER V.
CHAPTER VI.
CHAPTER VII.
CHAPTER VIII.
CHAPTER IX.
CHAPTER X.
CHAPTER XI.
CHAPTER XII.
CHAPTER XIII.
CHAPTER XIV.
CHAPTER XV.
CHAPTER XVI.
CHAPTER XVII.
CHAPTER XVIII.
CHAPTER XIX.
CHAPTER XX.
CHAPTER XXI.
CHAPTER XXII.
CHAPTER XXIII.
CHAPTER XXIV.
CHAPTER XXV.
CHAPTER I.
CHAPTER II.
CHAPTER III.
CHAPTER IV.
CHAPTER V.
CHAPTER VI.
CHAPTER VII.
CHAPTER VIII.
CHAPTER IX.
CHAPTER X.
CHAPTER XI.
CHAPTER XII.
CHAPTER XIII.
CHAPTER XIV.
CHAPTER XV.
CHAPTER XVI.
CHAPTER XVII.
CHAPTER XVIII.
CHAPTER XIX.
CHAPTER XX.
CHAPTER XXIII.
CHAPTER XXIV.
CHAPTER XXV.
Trajectory Analytics
Summary of Statistics
Reading Time
Occurrence of People, Places, & Things
Character Co-Occurence
Place Co-Occurence
Character Verb Associations
Top 100 Words
Top 25 Nouns
Top 25 Verbs
Top 25 Adjectives
Statistics by Chapter

Trajectory Introduction
A Note on eBook Publishing and the Trajectory Classics
Tablet publishing is not new. In fact, it was quite popular several thousand years ago when clay tablets were used as the original transportable media. Papyrus proved to be even easier to manage and to record the events of the day upon, but when that became harder to come by after the fall of the Roman Empire, Western writers turned to parchment and vellum. Calligraphers, copyists, correctors, illuminators, and rubricators (the lucky monks who were selected to paint the red letters) went about their long and laborious tasks to create a single book. Considering the effort that went into this, it is not surprising that books were often chained to tables in the original public libraries. From the Han Dynasty's creation of the woodblock printing method in the 3rd century, to Guttenberg's invention of moveable type in Europe around 1450, modern advances made it progressively easier to produce books and to make reading accessible to a larger number of people.
It is interesting to consider how readers must have reacted during the transition from beautifully hand-printed and custom illustrated books to the volumes that were mass-produced by a printing machine. The tactile experience of holding an original work of art must have been hard to part with, but few people had the chance to actually read these books, much less own them. It has been estimated that more books were published in the 50 years following Guttenberg's invention than in the prior history of mankind. Today, it is easy to imagine a future where personal digital libraries will rival yesterday's traditional public libraries.
Our goal here at Trajectory is to enable a new generation of readers to access and interact with the great works of mankind through the latest evolution in tablet publishing. We are deeply interested in allowing people to view these works through a new perspective, which includes the unique illustrations and the statistics generated through our semantic lens. Everyone who is inspired by evolving forms of art now has the opportunity to experience the Classics in a fresh way, and our hope is that our small contribution may enable readers to see these classic works in a new light.
Jim Bryant Trajectory, Inc. Marblehead, MA May 2014

About the Author


Nathaniel Hawthorne was an American novelist and short story writer.He was born in 1804 in Salem, Massachusetts to Nathaniel Hathorne and the former Elizabeth Clarke Manning. His ancestors include John Hathorne, the only judge involved in the Salem witch trials who never repented of his actions. Nathaniel later added a "w" to make his name "Hawthorne" in order to hide this relation. He entered Bowdoin College in 1821, was elected to Phi Beta Kappa in 1824, and graduated in 1825. Hawthorne published his first work, a novel titled Fanshawe, in 1828; he later tried to suppress it, feeling it was not equal to the standard of his later work. He published several short stories in various periodicals which he collected in 1837 as Twice-Told Tales. The next year, he became engaged to Sophia Peabody. He worked at a Custom House and joined Brook Farm, a transcendentalist community, before marrying Peabody in 1842. The couple moved to The Old Manse in Concord, Massachusetts, later moving to Salem, the Berkshires, then to The Wayside in Concord. The Scarlet Letter was published in 1850, followed by a succession of other novels. A political appointment took Hawthorne and family to Europe before their return to The Wayside in 1860. Hawthorne died on May 19, 1864, and was survived by his wife and their three children.

PREFACE
A preface generally begins with a truism; and I may set out with the admission that it is not always expedient to bring to light the posthumous work of great writers. A man generally contrives to publish, during his lifetime, quite as much as the public has time or inclination to read; and his surviving friends are apt to show more zeal than discretion in dragging forth from his closed desk such undeveloped offspring of his mind as he himself had left to silence. Literature has never been redundant with authors who sincerely undervalue their own productions; and the sagacious critics who maintain that what of his own an author condemns must be doubly damnable, are, to say the least of it, as often likely to be right as wrong.
Beyond these general remarks, however, it does not seem necessary to adopt an apologetic attitude. There is nothing in the present volume which any one possessed of brains and cultivation will not be thankful to read. The appreciation of Nathaniel Hawthorne s writings is more intelligent and wide-spread than it used to be; and the later development of our national literature has not, perhaps, so entirely exhausted our resources of admiration as to leave no welcome for even the less elaborate work of a contemporary of Dickens and Thackeray. As regards "Doctor Grimshawe s Secret,"--the title which, for lack of a better, has been given to this Romance,--it can scarcely be pronounced deficient in either elaboration or profundity. Had Mr. Hawthorne written out the story in every part to its full dimensions, it could not have failed to rank among the greatest of his productions. He had looked forward to it as to the crowning achievement of his literary career. In the Preface to "Our Old Home" he alludes to it as a work into which he proposed to convey more of various modes of truth than he could have grasped by a direct effort. But circumstances prevented him from perfecting the design which had been before his mind for seven years, and upon the shaping of which he bestowed more thought and labor than upon anything else he had undertaken. The successive and consecutive series of notes or studies [Footnote: These studies, extracts from which will be published in one of our magazines, are hereafter to be added, in their complete form, to the Appendix of this volume.] which he wrote for this Romance would of themselves make a small volume, and one of autobiographical as well as literary interest. There is no other instance, that I happen to have met with, in which a writer s thought reflects itself upon paper so immediately and sensitively as in these studies. To read them is to look into the man s mind, and see its quality and action. The penetration, the subtlety, the tenacity; the stubborn gripe which he lays upon his subject, like that of Hercules upon the slippery Old Man of the Sea;

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