H. G. Wells: The Best Novels
925 pages
English

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris

H. G. Wells: The Best Novels , livre ebook

-

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus
925 pages
English

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus

Description

Herbert George Wells (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946) — known as H. G. Wells — was a prolific English writer in many genres, including the novel, history, politics, and social commentary, and textbooks and rules for war games. He is now best remembered for his science fiction novels, and Wells is called a father of science fiction.His most notable science fiction works include The Time Machine (1895), The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), and The War of the Worlds (1898).

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 06 décembre 2019
Nombre de lectures 9
EAN13 9789897784378
Langue English

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0002€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

Table of Contents
The Time Machine
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
EPILOGUE
The Island of Doctor Moreau

INTRODUCTION.
I. IN THE DINGEY OF THE “LADY VAIN.”
II. THE MAN WHO WAS GOING NOWHERE.
III. THE STRANGE FACE.
IV. AT THE SCHOONER'S RAIL.
V. THE MAN WHO HAD NOWHERE TO GO.
VI. THE EVIL-LOOKING BOATMEN.
VII. THE LOCKED DOOR.
VIII. THE CRYING OF THE PUMA.
IX. THE THING IN THE FOREST.
X. THE CRYING OF THE MAN.
XI. THE HUNTING OF THE MAN.
XII. THE SAYERS OF THE LAW.
XIII. A PARLEY.
XIV. DOCTOR MOREAU EXPLAINS.
XV. CONCERNING THE BEAST FOLK.
XVI. HOW THE BEAST FOLK TASTE BLOOD.
XVII. A CATASTROPHE.
XVIII. THE FINDING OF MOREAU.
XIX. MONTGOMERY'S “BANK HOLIDAY.”
XX. ALONE WITH THE BEAST FOLK.
XXI. THE REVERSION OF THE BEAST FOLK.
XXII. THE MAN ALONE.

The Invisible Man

CHAPTER I
CHAPTER II
CHAPTER III
CHAPTER IV
CHAPTER V
CHAPTER VI
CHAPTER VII
CHAPTER VIII
CHAPTER IX
CHAPTER X
CHAPTER XI
CHAPTER XII
CHAPTER XIII
CHAPTER XIV
CHAPTER XV
CHAPTER XVI
CHAPTER XVII
CHAPTER XVIII
CHAPTER XIX
CHAPTER XX
CHAPTER XXI
CHAPTER XXII
CHAPTER XXIII
CHAPTER XXIV
CHAPTER XXV
CHAPTER XXVI
CHAPTER XXVII
CHAPTER XXVIII
THE EPILOGUE

The War of the Worlds


BOOK ONE THE COMING OF THE MARTIANS
CHAPTER ONE
CHAPTER TWO
CHAPTER THREE
CHAPTER FOUR
CHAPTER FIVE
CHAPTER SIX
CHAPTER SEVEN
CHAPTER EIGHT
CHAPTER NINE
CHAPTER TEN
CHAPTER ELEVEN
CHAPTER TWELVE
CHAPTER THIRTEEN
CHAPTER FOURTEEN
CHAPTER FIFTEEN
CHAPTER SIXTEEN
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN

BOOK TWO THE EARTH UNDER THE MARTIANS
CHAPTER ONE
CHAPTER TWO
CHAPTER THREE
CHAPTER FOUR
CHAPTER FIVE
CHAPTER SIX
CHAPTER SEVEN
CHAPTER EIGHT
CHAPTER NINE
CHAPTER TEN
THE EPILOGUE

When the Sleeper Wakes

CHAPTER I. INSOMNIA
CHAPTER II. THE TRANCE
CHAPTER III. THE AWAKENING
CHAPTER IV. THE SOUND OF A TUMULT
CHAPTER V. THE MOVING WAYS
CHAPTER VI. THE HALL OF THE ATLAS
CHAPTER VII. IN THE SILENT ROOMS
CHAPTER VIII. THE ROOF SPACES
CHAPTER IX. THE PEOPLE MARCH
CHAPTER X. THE BATTLE OF THE DARKNESS
CHAPTER XI. THE OLD MAN WHO KNEW EVERYTHING
CHAPTER XII. OSTROG
CHAPTER XIII. THE END OF THE OLD ORDER
CHAPTER XIV. FROM THE CROW'S NEST
CHAPTER XV. PROMINENT PEOPLE
CHAPTER XVI. THE AEROPHILE
CHAPTER XVII. THREE DAYS
CHAPTER XVIII. GRAHAM REMEMBERS
CHAPTER XIX. OSTROG'S POINT OF VIEW
CHAPTER XX. IN THE CITY WAYS
CHAPTER XXI. THE UNDER SIDE
CHAPTER XXII. THE STRUGGLE IN THE COUNCIL HOUSE
CHAPTER XXIII. WHILE THE AEROPLANES WERE COMING
CHAPTER XXIV. THE COMING OF THE AEROPLANES \

The First Men in the Moon

Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
Chapter 19
Chapter 20
Chapter 21
Chapter 22
Chapter 23
Chapter 24
Chapter 25
Chapter 26

The Food of the Gods


BOOK I.


CHAPTER THE FIRST.
I.
II.
III.
IV.

CHAPTER THE SECOND.
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
VIII.

CHAPTER THE THIRD.
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
VIII.

CHAPTER THE FOURTH.
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.

CHAPTER THE FIFTH.
I.
II.
III.



BOOK II


CHAPTER THE FIRST.
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.

CHAPTER THE SECOND.
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.



BOOK III.


CHAPTER THE FIRST.
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.

CHAPTER THE SECOND.
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.

CHAPTER THE THIRD.
I.
II.
III.
IV.

CHAPTER THE FOURTH.
I.
II.
III.
IV.

CHAPTER THE FIFTH.
I.
II.
III.
THE END

In the Days of the Comet


PROLOGUE
THE MAN WHO WROTE IN THE TOWER


BOOK THE FIRST
THE COMET

CHAPTER THE FIRST
DUST IN THE SHADOWS
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5

CHAPTER THE SECOND
NETTIE
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6
Section 7

CHAPTER THE THIRD
THE REVOLVER
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6
Section 7

CHAPTER THE FOURTH
WAR
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6

CHAPTER THE FIFTH
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6


BOOK THE SECOND

CHAPTER THE FIRST
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6

CHAPTER THE SECOND
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6
Section 7
Section 8

CHAPTER THE THIRD
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3


BOOK THE THIRD

CHAPTER THE FIRST
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6

CHAPTER THE SECOND
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4

CHAPTER THE THIRD
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
THE EPILOGUE
The Time Machine
by H. G. Wells [1898]
I
The Time Traveller (for so it will be convenient to speak of him) was expounding a recondite matter to us. His grey eyes shone and twinkled, and his usually pale face was flushed and animated. The fire burned brightly, and the soft radiance of the incandescent lights in the lilies of silver caught the bubbles that flashed and passed in our glasses. Our chairs, being his patents, embraced and caressed us rather than submitted to be sat upon, and there was that luxurious after-dinner atmosphere when thought roams gracefully free of the trammels of precision. And he put it to us in this way—marking the points with a lean forefinger—as we sat and lazily admired his earnestness over this new paradox (as we thought it) and his fecundity.
'You must follow me carefully. I shall have to controvert one or two ideas that are almost universally accepted. The geometry, for instance, they taught you at school is founded on a misconception.'
'Is not that rather a large thing to expect us to begin upon?' said Filby, an argumentative person with red hair.
'I do not mean to ask you to accept anything without reasonable ground for it. You will soon admit as much as I need from you. You know of course that a mathematical line, a line of thickness nil , has no real existence. They taught you that? Neither has a mathematical plane. These things are mere abstractions.'
'That is all right,' said the Psychologist.
'Nor, having only length, breadth, and thickness, can a cube have a real existence.'
'There I object,' said Filby. 'Of course a solid body may exist. All real things—'
'So most people think. But wait a moment. Can an instantaneous cube exist?'
'Don't follow you,' said Filby.
'Can a cube that does not last for any time at all, have a real existence?'
Filby became pensive. 'Clearly,' the Time Traveller proceeded, 'any real body must have extension in four directions: it must have Length, Breadth, Thickness, and—Duration. But through a natural infirmity of the flesh, which I will explain to you in a moment, we incline to overlook this fact. There are really four dimensions, three which we call the three planes of Space, and a fourth, Time. There is, however, a tendency to draw an unreal distinction between the former three dimensions and the latter, because it happens that our consciousness moves intermittently in one direction along the latter from the beginning to the end of our lives.'
'That,' said a very young man, making spasmodic efforts to relight his cigar over the lamp; 'that … very clear indeed.'
'Now, it is very remarkable that this is so extensively overlooked,' continued the Time Traveller, with a slight accession of cheerfulness. 'Really this is what is meant by the Fourth Dimension, though some people who talk about the Fourth Dimension do not know they mean it. It is only

  • Accueil Accueil
  • Univers Univers
  • Ebooks Ebooks
  • Livres audio Livres audio
  • Presse Presse
  • BD BD
  • Documents Documents