Summary of Wilma Mankiller & Michael Wallis s Mankiller
38 pages
English

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris

Summary of Wilma Mankiller & Michael Wallis's Mankiller , livre ebook

-

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus
38 pages
English

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus

Description

Please note: This is a companion version & not the original book.
Sample Book Insights:
#1 This book is the story of Wilma Mankiller, but it is also the story of the Cherokee people and their indomitable courage. The chapters weave together the story of one Cherokee woman with the history of all the people of the Cherokee Nation.
#2 Wilma Mankiller, the woman of the house, is barefoot and wearing a brightly colored dress. She sips a mug of coffee on the porch. The surrounding forests and hills conceal the animal life native to this eastern region of Oklahoma.
#3 The Cherokees were the first tribe to publish a newspaper in both English and their native Cherokee language. Wilma Mankiller, the first female chief of a major Native American tribe, was elected in 1980.
#4 Mankiller, who was elected chief of the Cherokee Nation in 1987, loved her land and her family. But she also loved serving the thousands of people she serves.

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 24 mars 2022
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9781669363712
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 1 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0150€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

Insights on Wilma Mankiller & Michael Wallis's Mankiller
Contents Insights from Chapter 1 Insights from Chapter 2 Insights from Chapter 3
Insights from Chapter 1



#1

This book is the story of Wilma Mankiller, but it is also the story of the Cherokee people and their indomitable courage. The chapters weave together the story of one Cherokee woman with the history of all the people of the Cherokee Nation.

#2

Wilma Mankiller, the woman of the house, is barefoot and wearing a brightly colored dress. She sips a mug of coffee on the porch. The surrounding forests and hills conceal the animal life native to this eastern region of Oklahoma.

#3

The Cherokees were the first tribe to publish a newspaper in both English and their native Cherokee language. Wilma Mankiller, the first female chief of a major Native American tribe, was elected in 1980.

#4

Mankiller, who was elected chief of the Cherokee Nation in 1987, loved her land and her family. But she also loved serving the thousands of people she serves.

#5

After the Trail of Tears, the Cherokee tribe was scattered and forced to live in small reservations. The years of good fortune and revival ended with tribal division over the Civil War. By 1907, the federal government had dismantled the tribal government and divided up the land in individual allotments.

#6

Mankiller was ten years old when her family was relocated to California as part of the federal government’s relocation program. She went on to become an activist, focusing on Native American issues. In 1979, she was seriously injured in a freak automobile accident, and she never allowed herself to become discouraged or to sink into despair.

#7

Mankiller was elected to be the principal chief of the Cherokee tribe in 1985. She has led the tribe to many successes, including the attraction of new businesses to eastern Oklahoma, the acquisition of more than $20 million in construction projects, and the establishment of a $8 million Job Corps training center.

#8

Wilma Mankiller was a major influence in many different circles of America. She was a strong leader who had helped the Cherokee Nation thrive, and she had a spiritual presence among all Americans.

#9

Mankiller has become a leader who can play easily to a variety of audiences. She is a female leader who has been as comfortably embraced by men as by women.

#10

My Cherokee name is Mankiller. It is an old Cherokee name that was originally not a name at all, but a rank or title used only after one had earned the right to it. My ancestors came from near Tellico, Tennessee, and were listed as Ah-nee-ska-yah-di-hi on record.

#11

The Cherokee Nation was destroyed in 1907, when Oklahoma became a state, and land was given out in individual allotments. My father, Charley Mankiller, was born in 1914.

#12

Native Americans were not considered official citizens of the United States until 1924, when Congress passed the Indian Citizenship Act. Only two children attended Sequoyah Training School with my father, Charley and his sister Sally. Sally was a beautiful girl who liked to wear fine dresses with her black hair piled on her head.

#13

The Bureau of Indian Affairs operated boarding schools for native children, like the Sequoyah School in Oklahoma, to try and acculturate them into mainstream white society.

#14

My father, who was raised in a boarding school, developed lasting friendships there with other Cherokee children and youths from other tribes. He also acquired his love of books there.

#15

My mother’s family history goes back to North Carolina, where her kin were some of the first iron makers. They also had a tradition of being Robin Hood-style bandits. After a few moves, my grandparents settled in Adair County, Oklahoma, where my mother was born.

#16

My mother, Irene, had come to learn the culture of the Cherokees. The name Mankiller, which sounds strange to most white people, was not foreign to her because she had lived in Cherokee country all her life and had attended school with many Cherokee people.

#17

I learned that Mankiller was a military title, but I also heard that there was another kind of Mankiller in my family’s past. I learned that many distinguished leaders from the past held the title of Mankiller throughout the various tribal towns.

#18

I am a Cherokee woman, and I am proud of my name and the history it carries. I am also proud of the long line of men and women who have been called Mankiller.

#19

The name Cherokee is a corruption of Tsa lagi, which is a Muskogean word that means people of a different speech. Our people were mountaineers who lived in the Allegheny region in what is now the southeastern United States.

#20

The Cherokee people are believed to have migrated from the Great Lakes region to the Southeast. However, others believe that they migrated south from Iroquoian-speaking tribes around the Great Lakes.

#21

The Cherokee people had a very strong women’s council, which was led by a very powerful woman named the Ghigau. This oral history is often dismissed by Western historians as mere myth.

#22

The Cherokee people were extremely militaristic, and women frequently accompanied men to the battlefield. They were also extremely religious, and believed that the world existed in a precarious balance.

#23

The so-called Columbus discovery, which is a myth, launched an era of cultural decimation and murder. Columbus and those who followed him are responsible for genocide, slavery, colonialism, cultural plunder, and environmental destruction.

#24

The Spanish invaders proved to be just as lethal on this continent. They believed that the natives were not human beings, but savages or simply some sort of animal.

#25

The first white trader to marry a Cherokee was Cornelius Dougherty, a stalwart Irishman from Virginia who apparently settled among the Cherokee people and spent the rest of his life with them.

#26

The Cherokee tribe was brought into contact with the European traders in the 1700s, and they began to become dependent on the trade goods the whites brought with them. The old tribal customs and native attire still prevailed, but some Cherokees yearned for more of the traders’ utensils and trinkets.

#27

The Cherokee tribe was heavily influenced by white settlers and traders, and they began to adopt many of their customs. The tribe developed a taste for white food and drink, and they began taking more animals than they needed for sustenance.

#28

The Cherokee Nation was weakened by constant warfare with other tribes and whites, as well as infectious diseases and alcoholism. The tribe never gave up, and they continue to strive to return to the harmony they once had.

#29

I was born in 1945 in Oklahoma. I had eleven siblings, and my parents had rented a house from other people until 1948, when we settled there on the family land. We had a few pieces of furniture, and no electricity. We used coal-oil lamps to light the rooms.

#30

We were not well off, at least when it came to money. We were dirt poor, and we lived in a small house with a tin roof.

  • Univers Univers
  • Ebooks Ebooks
  • Livres audio Livres audio
  • Presse Presse
  • Podcasts Podcasts
  • BD BD
  • Documents Documents