Gleanings from Gloucestershire Housewives - Traditional Recipes
204 pages
English

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204 pages
English

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Description

Originally published in 1936.Contents Include: Useful Kitchen Measures Gloucestershire Dishes and Old Recipies Soups Fish Meat Breakfst and Supper Dishes Salads and Salad Dressings Vegetarian Dishes Bread and Tea Cakes Buns and Scones Cakes Biscuits Puddings, Hot and Cold Pastries Cheese Dishes Sauces Jams and Jellies Pickles and Cordials Sweets Herbs Milk Miscellaneous Care of the Invalid Household Hints Keywords: Supper Dishes Vegetarian Dishes Cheese Dishes Jams And Jellies Tea Cakes Salad Dressings Household Hints Fish Meat Cordials Puddings Scones Hot And Cold Recipies Buns Pastries Pickles Gloucestershire Biscuits Sauces Soups

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Publié par
Date de parution 28 juin 2021
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9781528761130
Langue English

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0500€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

GLEANINGS FROM GLOUCESTERSHIRE HOUSEWIVES.

Published by The Gloucestershire Federation of Women s Institutes, Community House, Gloucester.

P RICE 1/- NETT .
P OSTAGE 2d.

S ECOND E DITION 3,000 C OPIES . 1936.

Obtainable from W.I. Office, Community House, Gloucester.
PREFACE.

This book is dedicated to those who, since June, 1916, have laboured unceasingly to establish the Women s Institute Movement for the betterment of life in the Gloucestershire countryside.
It is an attempt to place before Women s Institute members and friends, a record of old and tested recipes in use in Gloucestershire homes.
We hope that it may prove of interest and help, and we wish to thank those who have given helpful suggestions and kindly advice.
Especially do we wish to tender our grateful thanks to Viscount Bledisloe for the honour that he has done the Gloucestershire Women s Institutes in writing the Foreword.
H. H ODGES ,
S. C. H ARDING ,
Compilers.
FOREWORD.

Shakespeare makes Macbeth say before the appearance of Banquo s Ghost:-

Now, good digestion wait on appetite
And health on both.
And the Victorian poet Robert Buchanan, in speaking of a homely woman, says:-

In her very style of looking,
There was cognisance of cooking!
From her very dress were peeping
Indications of housekeeping.
It may well be questioned whether good digestion always follows the ingestion of viands whose recipe is of foreign origin and whose foreign titles on our British menus convey to the average Britisher no information whatever as to their nature and ingredients. Would not, moreover, there be greater contentment and comfort in the average British home if the housewife (be she of high or low degree) had fuller cognisance of cooking ? And should not cognisance of cooking, as also of the history of the culinary art and of the dishes served in old days to our forefathers, begin, like charity, at home? Our home is Gloucestershire, and, like other counties, we are gradually developing an interest in the past history of our own beautiful and romantic territory, its Saxon, Roman and Gothic treasures, and its folk-lore. If folk-lore, why not culinary lore? Oxfordshire, Wiltshire, Cornwall and other counties have, under the aegis of their Women s Institutes, assembled in booklet form, from among their members, old recipes of kitchen output of every description as well as of beverages, perfumes, cosmetics, cures for common ailments and useful wrinkles in the sphere of domestic management. That Gloucestershire has now done the same delights my heart, being (at any rate in these respects) a laudator temporis acti, and at the same time a profound admirer of the invaluable work of our county Women s Institutes in bridging social gaps, in the spirit of mutually helpful comradeship, and in pooling the knowledge of their members for the benefit of all. In wishing this informative and quaintly interesting little book wide-spread patronage and study, I feel certain that many good old Gloucestershire recipes, if more generally utilised by our county housewives, will improve, rather than impair, our digestions, and at the same time feed our imaginations generously with pictures of old-time housewifery and of the domestic art, as well as the self-reliant resourcefulness, of by-gone generations.
BLEDISLOE.
Lydney Park,
November, 1935.
INDEX.

P REFACE
F OREWORD BY V ISCOUNT B LEDISLOE
I NDEX
U SEFUL K ITCHEN M EASURES
G LOUCESTERSHIRE D ISHES AND O LD R ECIPES
S OUPS
F ISH
M EAT
B REAKFAST AND S UPPER D ISHES
S ALADS AND S ALAD D RESSINGS
V EGETARIAN D ISHES
B READ AND T EA C AKES
B UNS AND S CONES
C AKES
B ISCUITS
P UDDINGS , H OT AND C OLD
P ASTRIES
C HEESE D ISHES
S AUCES
J AMS AND J ELLIES
P ICKLES AND C HUTNEYS
W INES AND C ORDIALS
S WEETS
H ERBS
M ILK
M ISCELLANEOUS
C ARE OF THE I NVALID
H OUSEHOLD H INTS
USEFUL KITCHEN MEASURES.
The following measures are only intended as a guide when scales are not available:-
Solids -
1 heaped tablespoonful (tbls.)
1 oz.
1 level tablespoonful
1/2 oz.
1 heaped teaspoonful (tsp.)
1/4 oz.
1 level teaspoonful
1/8 oz.
A cup holding 1/2 pint of water when brimful = flour
6 oz.
Liquids -
1 teacupful
= 1 gill or 1/4 pint.
1 breakfastcup
= 2 gills or 1/2 pint.
1 tumblerful
= 2 gills or 1/2 pint.
GLOUCESTERSHIRE DISHES AND OLD RECIPES.
NOTES.

GLOUCESTERSHIRE DISHES AND OLD RECIPES.
GLOUCESTERSHIRE BLACKBERRY PIE.
Take a shallow pie dish and line with thin pastry, made with lard; do not make too light. Place a layer of ripe blackberries in the bottom, draining all juice away as they are put in. Add a layer of brown moist sugar, a grating of nutmeg, and small pieces of butter at even intervals on top; repeat this till the dish is full, putting rather more butter on the top. Put the juice into a small saucepan with 1 tablespoonful of Sherry, warm together and pour into dish, taking care not to wash the butter from the top. Cover with a rather thick pastry and bake in a moderate oven. This should be served hot.
M ITCHELDEAN AND A BENHALL W.I.
BADMINTON EGGS.
( Very delicious-a Kingly Dish. )
Boil 3 new laid eggs quite hard, and when cooked, place them for a minute in cold water. Remove the shells, and cut the eggs in halves lengthways; take out the yolks and chop them finely with six pickled mushrooms, two good sized truffles that have been previously boiled till tender in good stock. Put all this in a stewpan with a wineglassful of stock that the truffles were cooked in, a tablespoonful of ketchup, pepper, salt, and a tablespoonful of port. Let all simmer together for 10 minutes; then thicken with a little fresh butter that has been rolled in flour. Lay the whites of the eggs hollow part up, fill them with fried breadcrumbs, dust them over lightly with cayenne, and pour over them the mixture from the saucepan.
C IRENCESTER W.I.
BLACKBERRY WINE.
( Taken from a very, very old Cookery Book. )
To one gallon of Blackberry juice add one quart of water and three pounds of sugar; stir occasionally; when finished working, bottle it off. It is a lovely colour and like port.
T YTHERINGTON W.I.
GLOUCESTERSHIRE COTTAGE PIE.
1 lb. cooked beef, cold
1/4 lb. cooked bacon or fat ham
1 cup of cold potatoes
1 cup of breadcrumbs
1 oz. butter
1 egg
2 onions, seasoning, gravy
Mince the beef and bacon, season well. Fry chopped onion in butter until brown, then add gravy and boil 10 minutes. Mix egg, meat, bacon, potatoes and breadcrumbs. Add to the gravy, etc. Mix well. Turn into a greased pie-dish, bake 30 minutes. Serve cold with salad.
W ESTBURY - ON -S EVERN W.I.
CURRIED RABBIT.
1 rabbit
2 large onions
1 large apple
1 tablespoonful curry powder
1 1/2 tablespoonful flour
Sultanas
Demerara sugar
Stock
Butter
Pepper and salt to taste
Skin and joint rabbit, flour and fry in butter until golden brown, place in fire-proof dish, fry onion, chop apple, lay over rabbit. Mix flour and curry powder with milk, add stock, bring to boil, pour over rabbit, add handful of sultanas, and sprinkle well with demerara sugar. Cook in a good oven for 2 1/2 to 3 hours. 10 minutes before serving add a good lump of butter (not margarine).
(This Recipe is over hundred years old.)
S LAUGHTER W.I.
CHELTENHAM CAKES.
2 lbs. flour
1/4 lb. butter
1 pint warm milk
Yolks of 2 eggs
1 oz. yeast
Melt butter in the milk, then mix all ingredients together. Set to rise for an hour in warm place. Make into round buns about the size of a small tea saucer. Set to rise again. Bake in sharp oven about 15 minutes.
(Recipe extract from Recipes of Old England.)
M ATSON W.I.
CHELTENHAM PUDDING.
6 ozs. chopped suet
6 ozs. flour
2 ozs. breadcrumbs
3 ozs. raisins (stoned)
3 ozs. currants
3 tablespoonfuls sugar
1 teaspoonful baking powder
Half a nutmeg grated
A pinch of salt
A little lemon rind
2 eggs and a little milk
Mix all well together and make a stiff smooth batter. Butter a dish and bake 1 1/2 hours in a good oven. Turn out and serve with sweet sauce.
C OATES W.I.
CERNEY CAKE.
3/4 lb. flour
6 ozs. castor sugar
6 ozs. butter
1/4 lb. fruit
1 1/2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder
2 eggs
Beat well butter and sugar, add eggs beaten separately with flour alternately. Bake in a moderate oven for 1 1/2 hours.
B ROCKWORTH AND W ITCOMBE W.I.
GLOUCESTERSHIRE CHEESE AND ALE.
Cut some good Gloucestershire cheese into thin flakes, removing first any rind. Put in fire-proof dish, spread some mustard over and cover with strong ale. Cook until tender and cheese dissolved. Have ready some slices of thick brown toast, pour hot ale over toast sufficiently to moisten it, then the cheese. Serve very hot.
(Recipe extract from Recipes of Old England.)
M ATSON W.I.
DANDELION WINE.
( Recipe 34 years old. )
6 pints of Dandelion blossoms
2 oranges
2 lemons
3 1/2 lbs. sugar
A little root ginger to 1 gallon of water
Wash the dandelions and put into a pan or tub. Pour on 1 gallon of cooled water which has been boiled. Allow to stand for 14 days, stirring every day. Let stand another 7 days without stirring, then strain, squeez

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