A Collection of Woodwork Projects; Designs for the Making of Furniture, Furnishings and Accessories for the Home
183 pages
English

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183 pages
English

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Description

This book contains a fantastic collection of woodwork designs for the making of furniture, furnishings and accessories for the home. Including tables, shelving, storage solutions and much more, this book provides the handyman with enough furniture to beautifully furnish any home.

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Publié par
Date de parution 28 juin 2021
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9781528764902
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 2 Mo

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A Collection of Woodwork Projects
Designs For the Making of Furniture, Furnishings and Accessories For the Home
Copyright 2013 Read Books Ltd. This book is copyright and may not be reproduced or copied in any way without the express permission of the publisher in writing
British Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library
Making and Restoring Furniture
Furniture is the mass noun for the movable objects intended to support various human activities, such as seating, storing, working and sleeping. Most often, at least in the present day - furniture is the product of a lengthy design process and considered a form of decorative art. In addition to furniture s functional role, it can also serve a symbolic or religious purpose, for instance in churches, temples or shrines. It can be made from many materials, including metal, plastic, and wood, using a variety of techniques, joins and decoration, reflecting the local culture from which it originated. Furniture construction can be extremely technical, or very simple, dependent on the desired end product and skills of the maker.
Numerous courses are available to provide a grounding in furniture making, generally designed to broaden practical (as opposed to art historical) knowledge of materials, tools and design. For the amateur maker, such options can be an extremely useful route into building and restoring their own furniture. Typically, restoring furniture has been seen as a job solely for the trained craftsman, however with the advent of readily available courses, books and online tutorials, it has never been easier to start yourself. Furniture construction and restoration does take a good deal of preparation and persistence, not to mention a keen eye for detail, but can be successfully achieved by any enthusiastic individual.
One of the first things to assess, is what to look out for when purchasing (or evaluating your own) old furniture. As a general rule, if you are restoring furniture yourself, look for older mass-produced items, produced after the mid-nineteenth century. These (with some exceptions) will not have very high values, but are incredibly well made - able to last a long time in the family home. If in doubt, do ask an expert however! One should also be aware, that there are certain more recent styles and designers of furniture which are incredibly rare, for example Art Deco, Arts and Crafts, De Stijl and Bauhaus. Another key thing to look out for are dovetail joints ; they are strong and require skill to assemble, and are thereby generally a good sign of a well-constructed piece of furniture. Solid wood or plywood backing, for instance on the back or inside of drawers, are also good indicators of age, as solid wood will generally tell you that it is pre-twentieth century, whereas plywood was only utilised after this date. Perhaps more obviously, inscriptions and manufacturer s stamps can tell the owner a lot about their piece of furniture.
Painting and stencilling wood furniture is probably the most common, and easiest starting activity for the amateur furniture restorer. When finishing wood, it is imperative to first make sure that it has been adequately cleaned, removing any dust, shavings or residue. Subsequently, if there are any obvious damages or dents in the furniture, wood putty or filler should be used to fill the gaps. Imperfections or nail holes on the surface may be filled using wood putty (also called plastic wood; a substance commonly used to fill nail holes in wood prior to finishing. It is often composed of wood dust combined with a binder that dries and a diluent (thinner), and sometimes, pigment). Filler is normally used for an all over smooth-textured finish, by filling pores in the wood grain. It is used particularly on open grained woods such as oak, mahogany and walnut where building up multiple layers of standard wood finish is ineffective or impractical.
After the furniture is thus smartened, it should then be sanded (without entirely removing the finish) and primed before a base coat of paint is applied. Aerosols will provide a smoother finish than paintbrushes. If stencilling afterwards, make sure that the base colour is completely dry before the final step is embarked upon.
Recovering dining room chairs is another popular activity, involving skills with fabric as well as woodwork - also fashionable is metal furniture restoration. Metal work provides slightly different problems to those of traditional wood and chair restoring; one of the main questions is - do you actually want to make the piece as good as new? Rust and signs of wear can be removed to varying degrees, with many choosing to leave their pieces of furniture worn and torn; achieving the industrial look , popular in design circles. This is especially the case for small-scale furniture like lighting, various ornaments such as candlesticks and even larger pieces such as cast-iron beds. If a metal piece is going to be painted, it is imperative to first remove the rust however. This is a time consuming, but ultimately rewarding task to complete, and can be done by a professional for larger objects. Once the metal is rust free, all that remains is to prime and paint! Antiquing effects can also be used, i.e. sanding off layers of paint (of differing colours if the maker prefers) - finished off with a clear protective finish.
Today, British professional furniture makers have self organised into a strong and vibrant community, largely under the organisation The Worshipful Company of Furniture Makers , commonly referred to as the Furniture Makers or the Furniture Makers Company. Its motto is Straight and Strong ! Members of the Company come from many professions and disciplines, but the common link is that all members on joining must be engaged in or with the UK furnishing industry. Thus the work of the Company is delivered by members with wide ranging professional knowledge and skills in manufacturing, retailing, education, journalism; in fact any aspect of the industry. There are many similar organisations across the globe, as well as in the UK, all seeking to integrate and promote the valuable art that is furniture making. Education is a key factor in such endeavours, and maintaining strong links between professional practitioners, didactic colleges and the amateur maker/restorer is crucial. We hope the reader enjoys this book.
Contents
Living Room Furniture
A Table For the Television
A Folding Party Seat
Built-In Writing Table
Tripod Coffee Table
Holder For Radio Times and Licence
Many-Purpose Table
Ideal Room Divider
A Comfortable Padded Stool
A Useful Stool
Movable Bookshelves
Kitchen Furniture
Cabinet With Drawer
Kitchen Corner Cabinet
Scullery Sink Fitment
Pastry Table
A Table For the Kitchen
A Vegetable Rack
Make This Rack For Bottled Wines
Plate-Draining Rack
Miscellaneous and Outdoor Furniture
Making a Baby s Basket
Attractive Bathroom Cabinet
A Strong First-Aid Cabinet
A Filing and Storage Cabinet
Make a Billiards Table
A Paper-Hanger s Table
The Cosy-Corner Garden Seat
Make Your Own Deck Chairs
A Picnic Chair
Lightweight Seat For the Garden
Four Foot Garden Seat
Garden Table and Seats
Furnishings and Accessories
Decorative and Novel Bookends
The Otter Bookends
Shelves For All Purposes
Movable Workroom Light
Letter Rack
A Birthday Card In Wood
Prickles the Pencil Porcupine and Sharpener
A Spill Holder
A Useful String Box
Vintage Car Clock Case
TV Savings Cabinet
Index Record Card Holder
Decorative Inkwell Stand
A Handy Box For Buttons
A Dog s Lead Tidy
An Ashtray In Parian Marble
Horse Picture Frame
A Galleon Wall Plaque In Plywood
Buffalo Wall Bracket
A Decorative Pin Tray
Boys Brigade Watch Stand
Decorative Cosmetic Tray
A Miniature Mirror
God Bless This Home Plaque
Making the Fruit Bowl
Table Mats
Make a Handy Rack
A Useful Crumb Tray
Make a Squeezer For Wine Corks
An Expanding Clothes Airer
A Fitment For Toilet Requisites
Dutch Clog Plant Holder
Make a Window Garden
Junior Jigsaw Puzzle
Instructions For Making a Rowing Machine
Jack For Removing Boots
A Serviceable Coal Hod
Model Maker s Paint Box
Holder For a Power Drill
Handy Trolley For a Dust Bin
A Stand For Your Car Can Be Very Handy
Garden Trellis Work
Lawn Quoits
Living Room Furniture
A TABLE FOR THE TELEVISION


ALTHOUGH this table was designed specifically for a television set, it would be ideal as an occasional table about the house.
Dowel joints have been used instead of haunched mortise and tenon joints, as most households have a carpenter s brace or mechanic s drill, and a mortise gauge and mortise chisels may not be available.
The main framework consists of four legs and four top rails. These are all made from 1 7/8 in. by 1 in. material, and if this can be obtained dressed to these sizes, so much the better. The top rails are cut to the sizes indicated in Fig. 1 (two at 12 7/8 in. and two at 14 in.). Care should be taken to ensure that the ends of these rails are quite square.
The legs are 20 in. lengths of the same material and tapered to the sizes shown in Fig. 2 . How the legs can be economically cut from a 6 in. by 1 in. board is shown in Fig. 5 . Sixteen 1 1/2 in. lengths of 1/4 in. dowel rod are used to assemble the framework.
In order to make sure that the joints fit neatly the procedure shown in Fig. 2 should be employed. Mark a letter (A, B, C, etc) at each end of each top rail then similarly mark the top of each leg. It is important that rail A goes with leg A and so on.
Mark the dowel positions at the end of each top rail and knock in a small (say 3/4 in.) panel pin on each mark. Allow the head to protrude slightly. Nip off the heads of these nails with pliers so that they still protrude sufficiently to allow them to be pulled out later.
Press the end of each top rail on to its corresponding leg and two small dents will be made on the legs. These indicate the centre of the holes for the dowels. When the pins are removed from the top rails the pinholes give the centres of the top rail dowels. Drill all the holes 1/4 in. diameter and slightly more than 3/4 in. deep. Fig. 3 shows how to ensure drilling to the correct depth.
The front and rear frames of the table may be glued and assembled. When the glue is dry the top and bottom of each leg may be angled; that is the bottom is level with the floor and the top of the frame is straight.
Drill holes in the top rails for the screws which secure the table top from underneath. These screws should protrude 1/2 in. above the top rails. Note that Fig. 2 shows these holes counter-drilled so that a 1 1/2 in. by 8 screw may be used. These holes may be plugged with 1/2 in. diameter dowel when the table is assembled.
Next drill the holes in the legs to accommodate the 1/2 in. dowel rails. Note that these holes are blind ; that is, they do not pass right through the wood. They are in fact 3/4 in. deep ( Fig. 2 ).
The five lower rails are cut to size ( Fig. 1 ), and the holes carefully drilled, so that the distance between their centres is identical in every one and also identical with the distance between the two 1/2 in. holes in the frames.
The lower rails are now threaded on to two 15 1/2 in. lengths of 1/2 in. dowel. They are secured to the dowels by fine panel pins on the underside (see Figs. 1 and 2 ).
The complete framework may now be put together, taking care that everything is square before allowing the glue to set. Four fine beheaded panel pins secure the 1/2 in. dowels in their sockets.
The original table was constructed in mahogany (with the exception of the birch dowels), so a piece of 5/8 in. thick mahogany-faced ply was used for the top. The edges are bevelled to 10 and the corners slightly rounded, taking care to maintain a constant bevel all the way round. Do not fix on the top until all the polishing is finished.
Glasspaper all surfaces thoroughly. Lightly dampen the whole structure and top and allow to dry out completely. This allows the fibres of the wood to swell, and they may be cut down with glasspaper. Dust the wood with a dry cloth and apply four or five coats of white french polish, allowing each coat to dry. Glasspaper lightly and dust between each coat.
Carefully paint the edge of the plywood top black or some neutral colour. Do not use a cellulose paint or dope , as this will attack the french polish.
Finally go over all the surfaces with clean, rust-free steel wool dipped in furniture wax. Burnish the wood with a hard material, such as nylon or silk, until a smooth, hard finish is obtained.
The table will not have a high-gloss finish, but the satin smooth durable surface may be easily maintained.


Fig. 1


Fig. 2


Fig. 3


Fig. 4


Fig. 5
For those extra visitors
A FOLDING PARTY SEAT


LACK of seating accommodation is often a problem at party gatherings. A good long seat, capable of holding three or four persons, can be of real use at such a time, especially if it can be folded up and put away when the party is over.
A front view of our design is given in Fig. 1 , and a side or end view in Fig. 2 , with suggested dimensions. The legs are fitted to fold inwards, so as to allow the seat to be easily stored away. When let out, a stretcher bar is fixed across the legs to keep the seat firm and stable.
Cut the long rails to length given in the cutting list, and, at the distance shown, groove across for the cross rails at each end, and at the centre. The grooves need not be more than 1/8 in. deep, and the rails should be glued and nailed across. Punch these nail heads down to a trifle below the surface. At points A and B, in Fig. 1 , 1 in. square fillets are nailed across. Saw off the extreme corner angles at the ends of the long rails.
For the seat board, cut 1/2 in. plywood to the full length, and width of the seat, and screw to rails. Use flat-head countersunk screws. Divide the seat board into four divisions, roughly, with pencil lines, and in each division bore three holes with a gimlet, as shown in Fig. 3C . Now clean up the edges of the seat board and long rails to be level all round.
The construction of the legs will be plain from Fig. 4 . Each pair are connected with cross rails as shown, simply halved in and screwed or nailed. If the latter, then glue the joints as well. At the centre of each lower cross rail, saw out a notch as shown, 1 in. deep, for the stretcher bar D.
Turn the seat over, and holding each pair of legs firmly against its respective cross rail under the seat board, fix the legs in place with a pair of 2 in. back flap hinges. These will allow the legs to be folded under the seat, and when opened out, they will butt up against the end cross rails. For the stretcher bar, cut a strip of 2 in. square wood to the same length as the seat. Lay this across the lower cross rails, letting it rest in the notches. With assistance from a friend to keep the legs out, and flat up against the rails under the seat, mark with a pencil where they contact the leg rails, and there cut out notches 1 in. deep. A tight fit is desirable, and pressing the bar down in the notches should hold the legs firmly enough to ensure the stability of the seat.
A little padding to the seat board is desirable. A simple but quite effective method, calling for no particular skill in upholstery work, is as follows. Cut a piece of sheeting or close woven canvas a few inches larger than the dimensions of the seat board, and tack down one side to the front long rail. Now with a strip of 1/2 in. by 1 1/4 in. wood under the material, tack down about 12 in. of the opposite edge of canvas to the back rail. A look at C, Fig. 3 , will explain this. Remove wood strip, and then force the padding material (flock or kapok, perhaps) in the space between seat and covering.
Level the padding by application of the wood strip, working to an even thickness all over. Repeat this every foot or so to the end of the seat, then tack the ends down, and cut away all surplus. With a long stout needle, pushed through the holes in the seat board, make long stitches of twine to keep the padding from shifting about ( Fig. 3, E ). Cover the whole with a single layer of cotton wool to even out the surface, and then give a final covering of American or plastic cloth to finish off. Add a final touch by hiding the tack heads with matching banding, such as you can purchase from upholstery stores.


Fig. 1


Fig. 2


Fig. 3


Fig. 4
An alcove fitting
BUILT-IN WRITING TABLE


MANY houses today have small alcoves which are difficult to furnish because of their size. The writing table and cupboard described here should look well in any alcove not more than 3 ft. wide, and give the owner very useful service.
The framework should be constructed with lengths approximately 1 3/4 in. wide by 3/4 in. thick. First cut two lengths which, when fixed to the wall above the skirting, come to a height of 2 ft. 6 in. This is how high your writing table will be. It may, of course, be varied to suit individual taste. In these two lengths cut two grooves 1/2 in. deep and 3/4 in. wide, some 5 in. from the ends. These are to take the top crosspiece shown in Fig. 1 . To obtain a well-finished look, file or saw the bottoms of the two pieces to the same shape as the skirting top. Having made sure that the two lengths are level in height and exactly opposite each other, fix them to the wall, using three Rawlplugs and screws for each. It must be emphasized here that the frame must protrude from the wall to the same extent as the skirting when fixed.
The end members may now be screwed into place. These should run the depth of the alcove, and will support the shelves. The top pair should run at right angles to the top of the frame. The second pair should be 5 in. below these with their tops level with the tops of the grooves. The third pair should be some 12 in. below these.
Now prepare the top crosspiece, but before fixing, cut a groove in its centre 1 3/4 in. wide and 1/2 in. deep. This is to take the centre piece, which is shown in Fig. 1 .
The shelves are made of 1/4 in. ply or similar material. Cut the top shelf to the required size, sawing off the two front corners in order to clear the two side pieces of the frame. The shelf may now be nailed or screwed to the two end members and the crosspiece. In the same way, fix the bottom shelf.
At floor level insert a further length of framework extending from one skirting to the other immediately in line with the crosspiece holding the top shelf. In this piece cut a similar groove (1 3/4 in. wide, 1/2 in. deep) and insert a length of framework, extending into the groove previously cut in the top crosspiece. This length should be glued level with the backs of the two crosspieces, leaving a space in order that the doors close flush. A small right angle metal bracket may be screwed to the back of this piece, extending under the bottom shelf in order to give it additional support.
The writing top proper may now be slid into position along the two top end members. This should be 3/4 in. chipboard or plywood, extending some 6 in. out of the alcove when screwed into position. The front corners can be rounded for neatness.
Hardboard is used to make the doors, backed by frames of wood 1/4 in. thick and 2 in. wide ( Fig. 3 ). Cut out two pieces of hardboard and place them on top of each other to ensure complete uniformity. When placed side by side, the total length of the doors should be about 3/4 in. shorter than the length from the inside of one wall frame to the inside of the other. Fix the backing to the hardboard with panel pins.
Attach the doors to the wall frames by hinges and provide suitable ball catches and handles. A colourful appearance can be obtained by covering the unit in a modern plastic material.


Fig. 1


Fig. 2


Fig. 3
TRIPOD
COFFEE TABLE
This coffee table has been designed to fit in with any modern furniture scheme; it is easy to construct, is economical in timber, and strong although light in weight
THE top may be of plywood, laminated board, or any of the veneered chip boards provided it is of the right thickness. Alternatively, it could be of sound, dry hardwood, pieces being glued together to give the width. If plywood or plywood substitute is used the edge could be veneered. The rest of the table can be in any good hardwood, free from twist or knots, and can either be a match with the top, or can form a contrast.
One piece 6 in. wide by 5/8 in. will be enough for the three legs if they are marked out with the top of the first leg to the right, the top of the second to the left and so on, with 1/8 in. clearance between each for the sawcut. The mortise in the leg should be marked in pencil on the side of the leg, to give a guide for chiselling, as the mortise is not cut square to the leg, but at an angle. Assemble and glue each cross-bearer and leg together, and, after drying, clean up each face and top so that each leg unit is ready to fit into the centre block.


FIG 1 ( right ). SKETCH OF THE COMPLETED TABLE


FIG. 2. PLAN, ELEVATIONS, AND DETAILS
The leg units may be glued and cramped to the centre block, either singly or all together, depending on the cramps available. Clean up and level the top of the cross-bearer and legs, and scribe off the bottom of the legs so that the unit stands level. If desired, the outside edge of each leg could be given decorative treatment, as shown in the cross sections, either fully down the leg or tapering from the top of the leg to a full bevel at the bottom.
When completed the table should be wax polished after a sealing coat of white french polish. ( 162 )
CUTTING LIST


Working allowance has been made in lengths and widths. Thicknesses are net.
HOLDER FOR RADIO TIMES AND LICENCE


THIS useful fitment holds the current issue of Radio Times, and any other similar publication, and also accommodates the licence in a glass-fronted pocket. Also incorporated is a drawer for saving small sums during the year to defray the licence fee, and other expenses.
Fretwood or plywood, 1/4 in. thick, is suggested for making the article, and a coat of Japanese lacquer makes it an attractive and colourful wall fixture.
In Fig. 1 a front view D and side view E are given. Dimensions are shown in Fig. 2 . The front and back A are practically alike, the only difference being that the back piece is 1 in. longer, to provide for the top and bottom semicircular projections for screw-fixing to the wall.
When marking out these parts, the semi-circular projections are struck with compasses, the radius being 1/2 in. Draw two pairs of lines across, each 1/4 in. apart, as guides for cutting the mortises for the horizontal divisions shown at B. The tenons on these should fit their respective mortises tightly. In what will subsequently be the top division, cut out a 1/8 in. by 1 1/2 in. slot, for dropping any savings into the box below.
The space between the divisions is to receive the money box, and two end parts are required, one to be permanently fixed at one end of the space, and the other to the front of the box. These are cut to the size shown at C ( Fig. 2 ). Now round off the corners of parts A, and lightly glasspaper. Fit the licence pocket in position before gluing the article together.
The licence pocket is shown in Fig. 1 . A rebate is formed by three strips of 1/8 in. by 3/8 in. wood glued to 1/8 in. by 1/2 in. strip, and cut to length, then glued to the front. Mitred joints can be used effectively. A piece of thin clear glass is cut to fit in. For this, 1/16 in. clear plastic could be substituted.
The parts can now be glued together, and the end piece C glued to cover one end of the drawer opening. The top and bottom edges of the latter part should be filed to a quarter round. Any projecting portion of the tenons, showing at the front, should be glasspapered level.
The simple construction of the drawer is shown in Fig. 3 . Any thin wood can be used to make it, and the front, which is the second piece C, should have its top and bottom edges quarter rounded to match its fellow at the other end. Glasspaper the drawer, as necessary, to make it a good fit.


Fig. 1


Fig. 2


Fig. 3
MANY-PURPOSE TABLE


HOUSEWIVES will welcome this easily-made piece of furniture for its many uses as well as for its neat appearance. Although designed as a coffee table with bookshelves, it can be used to hold the interval sandwiches and cakes during a television session. In the summer it can serve at tea in the garden .
Two Hobbies Furniture Panels No.

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