Sensei Secrets
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69 pages
English

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Description

This study examines the developmental interactions between Japanese senseis (mentors) and early American leaders at Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky (TMMK). More specifically, this study examines why and how these early American leaders transitioned from the initiation phase of a mentor relationship to the active and transforma- tional participation of the cultivation phase. This research identifies characteristics of developmental interactions so that other leaders and mentors can effectively adapt Toyo- ta-style management practices and thinking.


Though the professionalization of Toyota Production Systems (TPS), also known as lean manufacturing, or sim- ply lean, has proven to be vast, the success rate of emula- tion and adaptation of sustained TPS has been low. One of the many problems that organizations face when adapting TPS is executive resistance and misunderstanding of lean management and leadership (Emiliani, 2018; Sherman, 1994). Toyota faced a similar problem of resistance when it hired leaders from other automotive companies into Toyota during the initial years at TMMK. Understanding how Toy- ota overcame this resistance offers insight into better mento- ring for adapting TPS.


This study performs qualitative interviews using oral history and grounded theory techniques. It specifically identifies characteristics of the transition from the initiation to cultivation phases of mentor relationships within TMMK from 1986 to 1992. This research illustrates how leaders who never before experienced the Toyota culture experienced transformation within mentor relationships, which enabled them to adopt Toyota's frame of reference for solving prob-lems and ultimately Toyota's culture. The findings may prove adaptable and beneficial for other leaders and execu- tives adopting TPS.


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Publié par
Date de parution 26 décembre 2020
Nombre de lectures 1
EAN13 9780999189757
Langue English

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0025€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

© 2020 Steven R. Leuschel
All Rights Reserved
ISBN: 978-0-9991897-5-7
Title: Sensei Secrets: Mentoring at Toyota Georgetown: A Qualitative Study of the Sensei-Protégé Relationship at Toyota
Author: Steven R. Leuschel
Dissertation Chair:
Dr. John A. Anderson
Dissertation Committee Members:
Dr. Erin L. Conlin
Dr. Ramesh G. Soni
This study examines the developmental interactions between Japanese senseis (mentors) and early American leaders at Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky (TMMK). More specifically, this study examines why and how these early American leaders transitioned from the initiation phase of a mentor relationship to the active and transformational participation of the cultivation phase. This research identifies characteristics of developmental interactions so that other leaders and mentors can effectively adapt Toyota-style management practices and thinking.
Though the professionalization of Toyota Production Systems (TPS), also known as lean manufacturing , or simply lean, has proven to be vast, the success rate of emulation and adaptation of sustained TPS has been low. One of the many problems that organizations face when adapting TPS is executive resistance and misunderstanding of lean management and leadership (Emiliani, 2018; Sherman, 1994). Toyota faced a similar problem of resistance when it hired leaders from other automotive companies into Toyota during the initial years at TMMK. Understanding how Toyota overcame this resistance offers insight into better mentoring for adapting TPS.
This study performs qualitative interviews using oral history and grounded theory techniques. It specifically identifies characteristics of the transition from the initiation to cultivation phases of mentor relationships within TMMK from 1986 to 1992. This research illustrates how leaders who never before experienced the Toyota culture experienced transformation within mentor relationships, which enabled them to adopt Toyota’s frame of reference for solving problems and ultimately Toyota’s culture. The findings may prove adaptable and beneficial for other leaders and executives adopting TPS.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
F irst and foremost, I would like to thank my wife, Mary, for her support during this process as well as my four children who came into this world during my Ph.D. journey: Edith, Henry, Augustine, and Gloria. My close mentors and advisors over the years that encouraged the Toyota Production System and its variations, including Rodger Lewis, Gary Quinlivan, David Adams, and Dr. Richard Kunkle. Without the work of the Kennametal Center for Operational Excellence and all those involved, my journey would not exist. To my advisors and professors at IUP, especially Dr. Valerie Gunter, Dr. John Anderson, Dr. Erin Conlin, and Dr. Ramish Soni, as well as my classmates in Cohort 16. Special thanks to Dr. Steven Phillips who helped with editing and input into the final version of this dissertation. Most importantly, I would like to thank all of those who participated in this research and those who will participate in future research.
Contents
1 INTRODUCTION
Background
Statement of the Problem
Purpose Statement and Research Questions
Research Design
Significance of the Study
Definition of Terms
Assumptions, Limitations, and Delimitations
Summary
2 LITERATURE REVIEW
Historical Context
United States Automobile Industry
From Craft to Mass Production
The U.S. Production System
The Role of the Automobile in the U.S. Society and Economy
The Challenges of the 1970s
Toyota Motor Company
Toyota Production System
Toyota Manufacturing Comes to the United States
The Diffusion of TPS in the United States
Toyota Supplier Support Center
Academia Promotes Kaizen
Professionalization: Experts and Consultants
Healthcare
Organizational Theory and Change
Scientific Management
Quality Management Theory
Leadership in Organizations
Leadership at Toyota
Mentoring: A Developmental Interaction
Types of Developmental Interactions
Mentoring
Mentoring and Coaching
Action Learning and Mentoring
Traditional Mentoring
Formal and Informal Mentoring
Characteristics of Mentoring
Phases of Mentoring
Initiation Phase
Cultivation Phase
Separation Phase
Redefinition Phase
Organizational Benefits of Mentoring
Mentoring in Japanese Culture
Summary
3 METHODOLOGY
Qualitative Research Methods
Case Study Techniques
Oral History Techniques
Grounded Theory Techniques
Narrative Analysis Techniques
Research Design
Research Questions
The Interview Process
Obtaining Accurate Oral History
Participants and Sampling
Setting
Instruments
Informed Consent and Final Release
Data Analysis
Sensei-Protégé Characteristics
Demographic and Other Characteristics
Emotional Behaviors and Negative Experiences
From Initiation to Cultivation
Mentoring Perspective
Considerations
Ethical Risks
Credibility and Trustworthiness
Confidentiality, Anonymity, and Privacy
Summary
4 RESULTS
Study Participants
Early Mandatory Developmental Relationships
Organizational Structure and Participant Roles
Characteristics of the Mentor Relationships at Toyota
Age and Gender of Participants
Perception of Knowledge/Experience
Duration, Purpose, and Timeframe
Schedule of Interactions, Organizational Distance, Direction, and Span
Location
Structure, Initiation, and Matching
Developmental Coordinator, Support, and Preparation
Trustworthiness of Senseis and Toyota
Separation and Redefinition
Summary of Early Mandatory Developmental Relationships
Mentoring and Protection
Stories of Protection
Story Number One: Americans Experience Frustration
Story Number Two: American Leader Protecting the Workforce
Story Number Three: Frustration of American Worker
Story Number Four: Mentee Stopped Production
Story Number Five: Protection from Inadvertent Neglect of Team Members...
Story Number Six: Introduction of Total Preventative Maintenance (TPM)
Story Number Seven: Participant Experienced Negative Japanese Emotion
Story Number Eight: Come With What You Have
Story Number Nine: Protection From Negative Consequences of Failure
Summary of Emotionally Charged Stories
The Mentoring Process
Initiation and Scientific Management
Learning to See and Listen
Standing in the Circle
Perfect the Standard
Initiation Summary
Cultivation
Problem Solving
Challenging
Self-Learning
Turning Points to Cultivation
Cultivating Quality Management
Summary
5 DISCUSSION
Research Questions
The Path to Self-Learning
Characteristics of the Sensei Relationship
The Theme of Protection
Scientific Management Application and Quality Management Learning
Engineer the Product and Process
The Continual Search for Quality
Transformational Learning
Limitations and Future Research
Summary
The House of TPS
REFERENCES
APPENDICES
Appendix D – Toyota Oral History-Style Questions
Appendix E – Sensei Characteristics
Turning Points for Cultivation
Appendix F – Semi-Structured Interview Questions Regarding Mentors
LIST OF TABLES
1 General Motors ƒFramingham Assembly Plant versus Toyota Takaoka Assembly Plant, 1986
2 Categories of Developmental Interactions
3 Career and Psychosocial Functions
4 Categories, Attributes, and Specific Characteristics of the Mentor-Protégé Relationships
5 Negative Mentoring Experiences, Categories, and Examples
6 Phases, Turning Points, and Characteristics of Mentoring Relationships
7 Names, Roles, and Interview Dates of Participants
8 Data Analysis Methods
9 Key Words for Separating Experience
10 Characteristics of Early Mandatory Relationships
11 Emotional Experiences
12 Mentoring Characteristics
13 Turning Points to Quality Management
LIST OF FIGURES
1 United Auto Workers Strikes 1946–1979
2 General Motors and Toyota Learning at and From NUMMI
3 Transferring Knowledge of TPS From Japanese Sensei to Early U.S. Leaders at TMMK
4 Types of Developmental Interactions
5 Transition to Cultivation: TMMK 1986–1992
6 Structure of Formal Mentoring at Toyota
7 Structure of Informal Mentoring at Toyota
8 Formal Mentoring at Toyota’s Suppliers
9 Reporting and Mentoring Relationships at TMMK
10 The Process From Initiation to Cultivation at Toyota
11 Path of Self-Learning Quality Management Model
12 Engineer the Standard and Develop Standards...
13 Full Self-Learning Quality Management Model..
CHAPTER ONE
INTRODUCTION
T he Arab oil embargo and the ensuing oil crisis of 1973 had major consequences on the global automobile market. In the U.S., the oil embargo (1973-1974) drew attention to foreign automobiles, resulting in Japanese and other economical imports increasing nearly three percent in market share (Treece, 2013). This was in part due to the higher quality of small fuel-efficient imports compared to “hasty, illplanned and poorly executed attempts” into making small cars by the U.S

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