Affective Images
192 pages
English

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192 pages
English

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Description

Affective Images examines both canonical and lesser-known photographs and films that address the struggle against apartheid and the new struggles that came into being in post-apartheid times. Marietta Kesting argues for a way of embodied seeing and complements this with feminist and queer film studies, history of photography, media theory, and cultural studies. Featuring in-depth discussions of photographs, films, and other visual documents, Kesting then situates them in broader historical contexts, such as cultural history and the history of black subjectivity and revolves the images around the intersection of race and gender. In its interdisciplinary approach, this book explores the recurrence of affective images of the past in a different way, including flashbacks, trauma, "white noise," and the return of the repressed. It draws its materials from photographers, filmmakers, and artists such as Ernest Cole, Simphiwe Nkwali, Terry Kurgan, Thenjiwe Niki Nkosi, Adze Ugah, and the Center for Historical Reenactments.
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction

1. Mapping Context and Place

2. Affective Images
2.1. Photographs of Black Suffering and Violence
2.2. Affective Images in the “New” South Africa

3. Burning Questions
3.1. The “Burning Man”
3.2. The Afterlife of Nhamuave’s Photograph
photo gallery follows page 118

4. Photographic Speech Acts
4.1. Migrant Life and the Image
4.2. Documentary Participatory Photography and Politics

5. In/Visibilities and Reenactments
5.1. De-identification and Multiplication?
5.2. From Documentary to Fiction—and Back: District 9

6. Conclusion: Affective Images of Belonging

Notes
Glossary
Bibliography
Filmography
Index

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 04 décembre 2017
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9781438467863
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 2 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,1648€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Exrait

AFFECTIVE IMAGES
AFFECTIVE IMAGES
POST-APARTHEID DOCUMENTARY PERSPECTIVES
MARIETTA KESTING
Cover image courtesy of the author.
Published by State University of New York Press, Albany
© 2017 State University of New York
All rights reserved
Printed in the United States of America
No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without written permission. No part of this book may be stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means including electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tape, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise without the prior permission in writing of the publisher.
For information, contact State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
www.sunypress.edu
Production, Eileen Nizer
Marketing, Fran Keneston
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Name: Kesting, Marietta.
Title: Affective images: Post-apartheid Documentary Perspectives / Marietta Kesting.
Description: Albany : State University of New York Press, [2017] | Includes bibliographical references and index.
Identifiers: ISBN 9781438467856 (hardcover : alk. paper) | ISBN 9781438467863 (ebook)
Further information is available at the Library of Congress.
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Contents
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Chapter 1 Mapping Context and Place
Chapter 2 Affective Images
2.1. Photographs of Black Suffering and Violence
2.2. Affective Images in the “New” South Africa
Chapter 3 Burning Questions
3.1. The “Burning Man”
3.2. The Afterlife of Nhamuave’s Photograph
photo gallery
Chapter 4 Photographic Speech Acts
4.1. Migrant Life and the Image
4.2. Documentary Participatory Photography and Politics
Chapter 5 In/Visibilities and Reenactments
5.1. De-identification and Multiplication?
5.2. From Documentary to Fiction—and Back: District 9
Chapter 6 Conclusion: Affective Images of Belonging
Notes
Glossary
Bibliography
Filmography
Index
List of Illustrations
Introduction
0.1 A “pass burning” demonstration, Soweto, SA, 1961, Magnum Photos, Ian Berry.
Chapter 1
1.1 Reenactment of Great Trek, “Piet Retief’s Manifesto, a float in the 1952 Jan van Riebeeck Festival,” Courtesy of the Cape Times.
1.2 Still from Lionel Rogosin’s Come Back, Africa , street scene in Johannesburg 1959.
1.3 Drum Cover from June 1951, Bailey History Archive (in gallery).
1.4 Still from the music video “Got Till It’s Gone” (in gallery).
1.5 Still from the music video “Got Till It’s Gone” (in gallery).
Chapter 2
2.1.1 Ernest Cole, Handcuffed Black Men 1967, House of Bondage. The Ernest Cole Family Trust and the Hasselblad Foundation.
2.1.2 Poster to end the conscription campaign of the SADF 1985, SAHA.
2.1.3 Hector Pietersen shot by police, carried by Mbuyisa Makhubo, on the left his sister, 1976. Photograph by Sam Nzima.
2.1.4 Poster by the Student Union for Christian Action 1985, SAHA.
2.1.5 Greg Marinovich, Inhlazane, Soweto, September 15 1990 (original in color).
2.1.6 Still from the music video “I ain’t gonna play Sun City” (in gallery).
2.1.7 Still from the music video “I ain’t gonna play Sun City” (in gallery).
2.2.1 Still of female witness in tears at TRC hearing, Facing the Truth , 1995, by Gail Pellett, gailpellettproductions.com; last accessed 8/9/2014 (original in color).
2.2.2 Fatima’s testimony in tears, still from Conversations (original in color).
2.2.3 Martiné’s daughter, still from Martiné and Thandeka (original in color).
2.2.4 Martiné’s daughter inside the tent, still from Martiné and Thandeka .
2.2.5 A single tear from Martiné’s daughter, still from Martiné and Thandeka .
2.2.6 Silent female protestors during Zuma’s speech at the ROC 2016.
2.2.7 Fatima refuses the conversation (still from Conversations ).
Chapter 3
3.1.1 “The Burning Man,” Photographer Simphiwe Nkwali, March 2008 (original in color).
3.2.1 The portrait photo of Ernesto Nhamuave, which was widely published after his death, still from The Burning Man (original in color).
3.2.2 Newspapers of the event, still from the film The Burning Man.
3.2.3 The filmmaker Adze Ugah, still from the film The Burning Man.
3.2.4 Road and landscape in Vuca, still from The Burning Man .
3.2.5 Ernesto’s son seen from behind, still from The Burning Man .
3.2.6 Striking a match, still from Man on Ground (in gallery).
3.2.7 The statement “Too many foreigners,” still from Man on Ground (in gallery).
3.2.8 Car burning with Femi inside, still from Man on Ground (in gallery).
3.2.9 Shack burning, still from Man on Ground (in gallery).
3.2.10 Stills from music video “Powa” by Tumi Molekane, South Africa 2011.
3.2.11 Stills from music video “Powa.”
Chapter 4
4.1.1 Boarded-up door with signs in Hillbrow, 2011, Marietta Kesting.
4.1.2 Example of a correct South African passport photo, source Passport Agency Website.
4.1.3 Nelson Mandela burning his pass, photo by Eli Weinberg 1960. University of the Western Cape, Robben Island Mayibuye Archives.
4.1.4 Zimbabwean Nationals waiting at Home Affairs in Johannesburg, photographer Believe Nyakadjara 2011 (in gallery).
4.1.5 Flyer of the IOM and SACTAP Campaign Against Trafficking (original in color).
4.1.6 Poster for exhibit by Médecins Sans Frontières, 2011 (original in color).
4.1.7 Poster by the Black Women Studies Group, 1982, SAHA (original in color).
4.1.8 Example of the self-labeling as a foreigner. The author is wearing the “Kwerekwere” campaign T-shirt, Marietta Kesting.
4.2.1 Self-portrait and text of Patience produced at Hotel Yeoville (in gallery) © Terry Kurgan Hotel Yeoville.
4.2.2 Self-portrait and text taken in the photo booth at Hotel Yeoville (in gallery) © Terry Kurgan Hotel Yeoville.
4.2.3 Working the City, poster presentation of Mimi. African Centre for Migration Society (ACMS), the Market Photo Workshop (MPW) and, the Sisonke Sex Worker Movement (in gallery).
Chapter 5
5.1.1 Stills from We Are Nowhere (original in color).
5.1.2 Simon’s ID Photo (reenactment), Marietta Kesting.
5.1.3 At Lindela Detention Center, women hiding—a still from Conversations .
5.1.4 At Lindela Detention Center, women lying on the floor and hiding—a still from Conversations.
5.1.5 Stills from Border Farm (in gallery).
5.1.6 Still from Border Farm, crossing of the Limpopo River, reenacted (in gallery).
5.1.7 Still from Border Farm, crossing of the Limpopo River, reenacted (in gallery).
5.1.8 A staged demonstration, still from Conversations .
5.1.9 A staged demonstration, still from Conversations .
5.2.1 The aliens on Earth, and the camps that they have to stay in, stills from District 9 (original in color).
5.2.2 Staged news cast, still from D9 .
5.2.3 Staged news cast, still from D9 .
5.2.4 Poster District 9 (original in color).
5.2.5 Poster by the APF “Stop Xenophobia,” 2008, SAHA (original in color).
5.2.6 Spaceship over Johannesburg, stills from D9 .
Conclusion
6.1 Still from Nando’s “Diversity Clip” (original in color).
6.2 Still from Nando’s “Diversity Clip.”
6.3 Still from Michelle Monareng’s Removal to Radium .
6.4 Still from Michelle Monareng’s Removal to Radium .
6.5 Still from Michelle Monareng’s Removal to Radium .
6.6 Still from Michelle Monareng’s Removal to Radium .
Acknowledgments
Preparation of this book was undertaken while I was part of the research group “Gender as a Category of Knowledge” at Humboldt-University, Berlin, and it would not have been possible without the support and resources I found there.
In the final phase Beth Boulokos and Rafael Chaiken of SUNY Press have advised me on all issues ranging from the practical to the conceptual, and I am deeply thankful for that.
Moreover, three anonymous peer reviewers have read my manuscript and offered detailed and thoughtful suggestions for changes and edits that the book benefited from immensely and that widened its scope.
A big thank you to the Hasselblad Foundation and the Ernest Cole Family Fund as well as the South African History Archive, UWC Robben Island Museum Mayibuye Archive, and to all other photographers and filmmakers, who have allowed me to publish their work.
While it is impossible to name all of those who have helped me with their discussions and insights or by their reading more or less developed drafts of this book, I want to thank particularly Christina von Braun, Gabriele Dietze, Claudia Bruns, Alisa Lebow, Julia Schoen, Katrin Köppert, Kirstin Mertlitsch, Nana Adusei-Poku, Todd Sekuler, Käthe von Bose, Aljoscha Weskott, Ole Graf, Thenjiwe Niki Nkosi, Pamela Phatsimo Sunstrom, Rangoato Hlasane, Darryl Els, Ulrike Kistner, Steven Brimelow, Avital Nates, Terry Kurgan, Michelle Monareng, Caroline Kihato, Loren Landau, Martin Ebner, Nanna Heidenreich, Diedrich Diederichsen, Daniel Hendrickson, Henriette Gunkel, Ulrike Auga, and Sophia Kunze.
In addition, Helga Kesting-Rathmann, Herwig Rathmann, Frank Dörwaldt and Dagmar Weiß, Gerhard and Anne Weiß, and Wolfgang Kesting have provided support in innumerable ways.
Parts of chapter 4 have been published in the essay “Photographic Portraits of Migrants in South Africa” in Social Dynamics. A Journal African Studies , vol. 40, (Cape Town: Taylor and Francis) 2014, 471–494, and ar

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