Summary of John West s Fry The Brain
92 pages
English

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92 pages
English

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Description

Please note: This is a companion version & not the original book.
Sample Book Insights:
#1 The Belfast brigade had been lying low, recovering from a string of successful British raids based on intelligence from ‘touts’ - what the PIRA turncoats were called. They were ready to act as they had just finished training a new urban sniper cell.
#2 The group met at a pub, but not Reilley’s. Reilley’s was just the code word for meeting at a prearranged location. If the authorities were listening to their phone lines, the police would have no idea where they were actually meeting.
#3 The four men, who had never met before, sat down at a table in the pub. They casually scanned the pub, taking stock of who was in it and what they were doing. Nothing out of the ordinary stood out.
#4 The four men left the pub and followed Gerry to a van parked outside. The van was stolen the day before from an airport long-term parking lot by a separate PIRA unit specializing in obtaining vehicles for combat operations. The men were briefed on the key characteristics of the battlefield.

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 23 juillet 2022
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9798822546646
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 1 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0200€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

Insights on John West's Fry The Brain
Contents Insights from Chapter 1 Insights from Chapter 2 Insights from Chapter 3 Insights from Chapter 4 Insights from Chapter 5 Insights from Chapter 6 Insights from Chapter 7 Insights from Chapter 8 Insights from Chapter 9 Insights from Chapter 10 Insights from Chapter 11 Insights from Chapter 12 Insights from Chapter 13 Insights from Chapter 14 Insights from Chapter 15 Insights from Chapter 16 Insights from Chapter 17 Insights from Chapter 18 Insights from Chapter 19 Insights from Chapter 20 Insights from Chapter 21 Insights from Chapter 22 Insights from Chapter 23
Insights from Chapter 1



#1

The Belfast brigade had been lying low, recovering from a string of successful British raids based on intelligence from ‘touts’ - what the PIRA turncoats were called. They were ready to act as they had just finished training a new urban sniper cell.

#2

The group met at a pub, but not Reilley’s. Reilley’s was just the code word for meeting at a prearranged location. If the authorities were listening to their phone lines, the police would have no idea where they were actually meeting.

#3

The four men, who had never met before, sat down at a table in the pub. They casually scanned the pub, taking stock of who was in it and what they were doing. Nothing out of the ordinary stood out.

#4

The four men left the pub and followed Gerry to a van parked outside. The van was stolen the day before from an airport long-term parking lot by a separate PIRA unit specializing in obtaining vehicles for combat operations. The men were briefed on the key characteristics of the battlefield.

#5

The Belfast unit separated its intelligence collection activities from its ASU activities. The van only idled in place for two minutes when Gerry drove back to the pub. He stopped a mile short at a small parking lot near several shops.

#6

Mike and Shawn went into the pub. They knew they had to kill or be killed, so they wanted to go out feeling good. They knew they would be dead or in prison an hour from now, so they decided to go out drinking.

#7

The operation was executed, and the trio returned to Tom, who had a can of Coke waiting for him. He opened it and took a long swig. Don’t drink and drive! he warned. Tom had half of the job done.

#8

Shawn was ten minutes away from the shoot. He secured a disassembled AR-15 in a plastic bag and placed it in the cooler. He poured water into a suppressor and soaked it, before putting it on the end of the rifle’s barrel.

#9

The police were able to see the back of the van as it drove past, but not the gunman. The gunman was wearing a woman’s nylon mask and a black nylon balaclava, which completely covered his hair and face.

#10

The gang was able to dump the body at the intersection without being seen. Two Land Rovers arrived to collect the body, and Jimmy gave early warning of them like instructed. It was now up to the trigger man to do the rest.

#11

The police officer saw the body of a man on the side of the road. He was wearing black body armor over his smartly pressed uniform, and he had an MP-5 submachine gun. The policeman knew that the PIRA often dumped the bodies of British informers so they could be easily found.

#12

Shawn shot the Peeler in the pelvis, trying to hit an artery or at least the intestines. He knew this was the right answer. His instructors had been in the same situation before. It’s called a body armor drill, men. You have no idea what kind of armor they have on at a distance and at more than a hundred meters, the head is a difficult target.

#13

After the mission, Shawn began the counter-forensic process, removing any incriminating evidence like fingerprints and gunpowder residue. He even cleaned his ears and nostrils, which could contain incriminating gunshot residue.

#14

After the operation, Shawn was glad it was over. He had just seriously wounded a man, maybe even taken his life. He would burn his clothes in the chimney, eliminating any forensic link connecting the shooting to him.

#15

The IRA had to step up the tempo in the cities, and they needed to provide the British with casualties. If they could provide the steady stream of casualties, there was plenty of work for them.
Insights from Chapter 2



#1

Urban guerrilla sniping is a drastic departure from traditional concepts of sniping. In fact, traditional sniper methodology falls flat in the arena of urban guerrilla warfare for a variety of reasons.

#2

A person who is educated in their field has an advantage over someone who is not, but this is not always the case. Some of the world’s best snipers are self-taught.

#3

The Ghillie Suit is a rural-centric camouflage method that only works in the woods. It makes a sniper stick out in an urban environment. For example, Urban sniper/mass murderer Charles Whitman calmly walked to the observation deck of the Texas Tower in Austin, Texas on August 1, 1966 wearing a pair of coveralls.

#4

A high-powered rifle is not required for effective sniping, especially in an urban environment where a long-barreled, bulky weapon is more of a liability than an asset. In Chechnya, guerrillas were successful at killing Russian soldiers with head shots fired from. 22 caliber rifles.

#5

A high-powered scope is not a requirement for effective sniping. Simo Hayha, the most successful sniper of all times, was a Finnish soldier who killed 542 Russian soldiers over the course of only three months during the Russo-Finish War in 1940. He did not use a scope on his Finnish M28, 7. 62 mm, bolt-action rifle because he thought he created too great a silhouette when he raised his head to look through the scope.

#6

Urban combat ranges are often much smaller than those found in a rural setting. In many situations, soldiers are so close to their enemy that they cannot take a long distance shot even if they wanted to.

#7

The sex of the sniper is important in guerrilla warfare. Since men are typically expected to be snipers, deviations from this stereotype help a guerrilla remain undetected. Women all over the world receive less scrutiny from security forces and the general public than do men, enabling them to move more easily in government controlled areas.

#8

The conventional sniper lives a life of simplicity. They do not have to conceal their profession since they live and work in the open. The guerrilla sniper, on the other hand, must live a life of secrecy and never allow the public to know their true discipline.

#9

Guerrilla snipers have to deal with checkpoints, random searches, nighttime raids, and trained guard dogs trying to sniff them out. They have to find ways to bypass a security force’s population control measures in order to remain anonymous and retain an acceptable level of movement.

#10

The guerrilla sniper cannot operate like this. Everything they do must be done in absolute secrecy. They must hide the fact they are going to take a shot, the shot itself, and the fact they just took a shot.

#11

The guerrilla sniper has a difficult task because they are burdened with conducting every aspect of their operation in complete secrecy. They must possess a variety of skills that go far beyond making a bullet hit its intended target, but that are as much a part of their job as squeezing the trigger.

#12

The guerrilla sniper must conceal their weapon, their intentions, and the actual taking of their shot. This is difficult, and requires a detailed methodology and strict discipline.

#13

The number and variety of vehicles in a city can be an asset for the sniper because they can hide in the sea of cars just as they disappear in an ocean of people. The vehicle is its own microenvironment, providing complete concealment from the rest of the urban surroundings.

#14

The guerrilla sniper can choose from a large variety of vantage points to shoot from in a city. Buildings, which are their own isolated microenvironments, allow the sniper to observe their target and make a shot completely isolated from the surrounding populace.

#15

The urban environment is one of obstacles and a shooter will most likely have to fire through various urban mediums such as car doors and windshields, windows and doors of structures, and body armor and helmets. The sniper must be able to penetrate these mediums.

#16

The urban sniper cannot hide in the woods or a clump of bushes to conceal themselves from the enemy and prepare for their shot. In the urban world, different shooting platforms are required to be successful.

#17

The guerrilla sniper is a very difficult foe to fight, because they intentionally blend in with the population. They do this by appearing as a normal citizen, wearing civilian clothes, and then taking a shot at an unsuspecting soldier or policeman.

#18

The laws of land warfare states that it is legal to impersonate the enemy as long as you do not fight while in their uniform. With this as a legal baseline, consider a Polish sniper who fought in Warsaw in 1944 wearing a German uniform and carrying a Mauser K98 sniper rifle.

#19

The laws of land warfare do not apply to guerrilla snipers, as they are not wearing a recognized uniform. However, the laws of camouflage do apply, and these snipers are still abiding by them.

#20

The Ghetto Jews were supposed to calmly walk to the gas chambers, but they instead snuck into the sewers and took out their oppressors. The Russian invasion of Afghanistan in 1979, the Israeli takeover of the West Bank and Gaza Strip in 1967, and the American invasion of Iraq in 2003 all claimed to be conducting lawful military operations in support of national security interests.

#21

Guerrilla snipers are a powerful tool that can be used to discriminate and avoid collateral damage. They are also a means for attrition warfare, steadily picking off security forces

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