The Truth of the Russian Revolution
240 pages
English

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240 pages
English

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Description

Bronze Medalist, 2018 Independent Publisher Book Awards in the World History Category
Gold Winner, 2017 Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards in the History category

Major General Konstantin Ivanovich Globachev was chief of the Okhrana, the Tsarist secret police, in Petrograd (now St. Petersburg) in the two years preceding the 1917 Russian Revolution. This book presents his memoirs—translated in English for the first time—interposed with those of his wife, Sofia Nikolaevna Globacheva. The general's writings, which he titled The Truth of the Russian Revolution, provide a front-row view of Tsar Nicholas II's final years, the revolution, and its tumultuous aftermath. Globachev describes the political intrigue and corruption in the capital and details his office's surveillance over radical activists and the mysterious Rasputin. His wife takes a more personal approach, depicting her tenacity in the struggle to keep her family intact and the family's flight to freedom. Her descriptions vividly portray the privileges and relationships of the noble class that collapsed with the empire. Translator Vladimir G. Marinich includes biographical information, illustrations, a glossary, and a timeline to contextualize this valuable primary source on a key period in Russian history.
List of Illustrations
Translator’s Preface
Translator’s Acknowledgments

Introduction: Zinaida I. Peregudova and Jonathan Daly

1. Introduction to My Memoirs
General Globachev

2. The Globachevs’ Early Years
Vladimir G. Marinich

3. Our Years in Poland
Sofia Globacheva

4. Nizhni Novgorod and Sevastopol
Sofia Globacheva

5. Petrograd
Sofia Globacheva

6. The Organization of the Okhrana
General Globachev

7. The Role of the Central War Industry Committee
General Globachev

8. Alexander Kerensky
General Globachev

9. The Politics of the Miasoedov Affair
General Globachev

10. Rasputin
General Globachev

11. Many Ministers
General Globachev

12. Khvostov, Komissarov, Kamenev
General Globachev

13. Sturmer
General Globachev

14. Protopopov and the Eve of Revolution
General Globachev

15. Political Unrest—the Regiment Rebels
General Globachev

16. Globachev’s Track Record: A Description and Commentary of Globachev’s Tenure and Track Record as Head of the Petrograd Okhrana
Zinaida I. Peregudova, Jonathan Daly, and Vladimir G. Marinich

17. Turmoil
Sofia Globacheva

18. Allies and Adversaries
General Globachev

19. My Husband under Arrest
Sofia Globacheva

20. Imprisonment in the Tauride Palace
General Globachev

21. Incarcerated Life
General Globachev

22. Imprisonment Continues and the Bolsheviks Rise Up
General Globachev

23. My Husband’s Release, but Now Fear
Sofia Globacheva

24. The Revolution Deepens
General Globachev

25. Our Flight South
Sofia Globacheva

26. The Situation in Ukraine
General Globachev

27. Odessa’s Defense and Evacuation
General Globachev

28. Evacuation from Russia
Sofia Globacheva

29. A Short Return to Russia
Sofia Globacheva

30. Refugees on the Prince’s Islands
General Globachev

31. Our Homeland Deteriorates
General Globachev

32. Return to Odessa and to Turkey
General Globachev

33. Life on Prinkipo and in Constantinople
Sofia Globacheva

34. The High Command in Turkey
General Globachev

35. Last Days in Constantinople
Sofia Globacheva

36. Waning Hopes
General Globachev

37. Epilogue
Vladimir G. Marinich

Appendix A Globachev Timeline
Appendix B Globachev’s Transfer to Nizhni Novgorod
Notes
Glossary
Annotated List of Names
Bibliography
Index

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 12 avril 2017
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9781438464640
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 3 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,1698€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

THE TRUTH OF THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION
THE TRUTH OF THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION
THE MEMOIRS OF THE TSAR’S CHIEF OF SECURITY AND HIS WIFE
Konstantin Ivanovich Globachev
and
Sofia Nikolaevna Globacheva
Translated by
Vladimir G. Marinich
Published by State University of New York Press, Albany
© 2017 State University of New York
All rights reserved
Printed in the United States of America
No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without written permission. No part of this book may be stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means including electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tape, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise without the prior permission in writing of the publisher.
For information, contact State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
www.sunypress.edu
Production, Ryan Morris
Marketing, Michael Campochiaro
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Names: Globachev, K. I. (Konstantin Ivanovich), author. | Globacheva, Sofia Nikolaevna, co-author.
Title: The truth of the Russian Revolution : the memoirs of the Tsar's Chief of Security and his wife / by Konstantin Ivanovich Globachev and Sofia Nikolaevna Globacheva ; translated by Vladimir G. Marinich.
Description: Albany : State University of New York Press, 2017. | Includes bibliographical references and index.
Identifiers: LCCN 2016031451 (print) | LCCN 2016053682 (ebook) | ISBN 9781438464633 (hardcover) | ISBN 9781438464640 (ebook)
Subjects: LCSH: Globachev, K. I. (Konstantin Ivanovich) | Globacheva, Sofia Nikolaevna. | Soviet Union—History—Revolution, 1917–1921—Personal narratives. | Soviet Union—History—Revolution, 1917–1921—Influence. | Nicholas II, Emperor of Russia. 1868–1918—Friends and associates. | Russia. Okhranny otd lenī —Biography. | Secret service—Russia—History—20th century. | Political culture—Russia (Federation)—Saint Petersburg—History—20th century. | Political corruption—Russia (Federation)—Saint Petersburg—History—20th century. | Saint Petersburg (Russia)—History—20th century.
Classification: LCC DK265.7.G56 A3 2017 (print) | LCC DK265.7.G56 (ebook) | DDC 947.084/1—dc23
LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2016031451
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
This work is dedicated to three Babas: Oleg’s and Vladimir’s Baba Their children’s Baba Pax and Thea’s Baba
Contents List of Illustrations Translator’s Preface Translator’s Acknowledgments Introduction Zinaida I. Peregudova and Jonathan Daly Chapter 1 Introduction to My Memoirs General Globachev Chapter 2 The Globachevs’ Early Years Vladimir G. Marinich Chapter 3 Our Years in Poland Sofia Globacheva Chapter 4 Nizhni Novgorod and Sevastopol Sofia Globacheva Chapter 5 Petrograd Sofia Globacheva Chapter 6 The Organization of the Okhrana General Globachev Chapter 7 The Role of the Central War Industry Committee General Globachev Chapter 8 Alexander Kerensky General Globachev Chapter 9 The Politics of the Miasoedov Affair General Globachev Chapter 10 Rasputin General Globachev Chapter 11 Many Ministers General Globachev Chapter 12 Khvostov, Komissarov, Kamenev General Globachev Chapter 13 Sturmer General Globachev Chapter 14 Protopopov and the Eve of Revolution General Globachev Chapter 15 Political Unrest—the Regiment Rebels General Globachev Chapter 16 Globachev’s Track Record: A Description and Commentary of Globachev’s Tenure and Track Record as Head of the Petrograd Okhrana Zinaida I. Peregudova, Jonathan Daly, and Vladimir G. Marinich Chapter 17 Turmoil Sofia Globacheva Chapter 18 Allies and Adversaries General Globachev Chapter 19 My Husband under Arrest Sofia Globacheva Chapter 20 Imprisonment in the Tauride Palace General Globachev Chapter 21 Incarcerated Life General Globachev Chapter 22 Imprisonment Continues and the Bolsheviks Rise Up General Globachev Chapter 23 My Husband’s Release, but Now Fear Sofia Globacheva Chapter 24 The Revolution Deepens General Globachev Chapter 25 Our Flight South Sofia Globacheva Chapter 26 The Situation in Ukraine General Globachev Chapter 27 Odessa’s Defense and Evacuation General Globachev Chapter 28 Evacuation from Russia Sofia Globacheva Chapter 29 A Short Return to Russia Sofia Globacheva Chapter 30 Refugees on the Prince’s Islands General Globachev Chapter 31 Our Homeland Deteriorates General Globachev Chapter 32 Return to Odessa and to Turkey General Globachev Chapter 33 Life on Prinkipo and in Constantinople Sofia Globacheva Chapter 34 The High Command in Turkey General Globachev Chapter 35 Last Days in Constantinople Sofia Globacheva Chapter 36 Waning Hopes General Globachev Chapter 37 Epilogue Vladimir G. Marinich Appendix A Globachev Timeline Appendix B Globachev’s Transfer to Nizhni Novgorod Notes Glossary Annotated List of Names Bibliography Index
Illustrations
Maps 1 Map of Petrograd. 2 The Black Sea, showing some of the major locations mentioned in the Globachev memoirs: Sevastopol during the outbreak of World War I, Odessa, Rostov-on-Don, and Novorossiysk during the Civil War, and Istanbul (Constantinople) after the evacuation of the White Army. 3 Constantinople could be seen from the Princes’ Islands, which are between one and two hours by ferry from the city. The largest island is Prinkipo; the second largest is Halki.
Figures 2.1 Konstantin Globachev, about ten years old. 2.2 Globachev as a Junior Lieutenant. 2.3 Nikolai Korneleevich Popov. 2.4 Sofia, circa 1898. 2.5 The newlywed Globachevs, 1898. 2.6 Globachev as Staff Captain. 3.1 A commercial street in Byalystok. 3.2 Petrovskii Avenue in Lodz. 3.3 Lieutenant Colonel Globachev. 3.4 Sofia Nikolaevna Globacheva, circa 1910. 3.5 A major avenue in Warsaw. 4.1 Colonel Globachev and staff of the Nizhni Novgorod Gendarme Administration. 4.2 A major avenue in Nizhni Novgorod. 4.3 Nizhni Novgorod straddling the Volga. From W. Chapin Huntington, The Homesick Million. 4.4 Visit to Nizhni Novgorod by Tsar Nicholas and family. 4.5 The Tsar’s riverboat. 4.6 A view of Sevastopol from the sea. 4.7 The German Battleship Goeben in Constantinople. 5.1 Gregory Efimovich Rasputin. 5.2 Major General Globachev, circa 1916. 6.1 An office within the Special Corps of Gendarmes in Petrograd, approximately 1913 to 1915. 7.1 Alexander Ivanovich Guchkov. 8.1 Alexander Fedorovich Kerensky. 9.1 Colonel Sergei Nikolaevich Miasoedov. 10.1 Rasputin (left), Bishop Iliodor (center), Priest Germogen (right). 10.2 Rasputin entertaining ladies and gentlemen of Petrograd society. The Empress’ Lady-in-Waiting, Anna Vyrubova, is fifth from the left. 11.1 Nicholas Alexeevich Maklakov. 11.2 Major General V. F. Nikol’skii, Chief of Staff Corps of Gendarmes (on left); General V.F. Dzhunkovskii, Deputy Minister of Interior (in center); V. A. Brune de St.-Hyppolite, Director of Department of Police. Approximately 1913. 12.1 Alexei Nikolaevich Khvostov. 12.2 Stepan Beletskii, Director of the Department of Police and subsequently Assistant Minister of the Interior. 13.1 Boris Vladimirovich Sturmer. 13.2 General Evgenii Konstantinovich Klimovich. 13.3 Alexander Alexeevich Khvostov. 14.1 Alexander Dmitrievich Protopopov. 15.1 Revolutionaries destroying police archives. 15.2 Dispersion of a demonstration in the streets of Petrograd as a result of machine gun fire. 16.1 Maj. Gen. Alexander Ivanovich Spiridovich. 19.1 Tavricheskii (Tauride) Palace—the meeting place of the Duma. The Petrograd center of the Revolution in March, 1917. 20.1 Vladimir Lvovich Burtsev. 23.1 Moisei Solomonovich Uritskii. 25.1 A major avenue in Kiev, approximately 1900 to 1915. 26.1 Hetman Pavel Petrovich Skoropadskii. 27.1 Major General Alexeii Nikolaevich Grishin-Almazov. 27.2 One of the main streets of Odessa. 27.3 French ships ready to evacuate Odessa. 29.1 One of the evacuation ships overloaded with Russian refugees 31.1 General Anton Ivanovich Denikin. 32.1 The White Army evacuating Crimea. 33.1 Russian refugees arriving at Prinkipo. 33.2 Main entrance to the Russian Embassy in Constantinople. 33.3 The Globachevs with friends on a quay in Constantinople, August 1921. 33.4 The Galata Bridge. 34.1 General Alexander Sergeevich Lukomskii. 35.1 The Globachevs in Constantinople, 1920. 35.2 Evacuees boarding a ship, dates from 1919 to 1921. 35.3 Baron General Peter Wrangel, the last Commander in Chief of the White Army. 35.4 The ship Constantinople that brought the Globachevs to the United States. 36.1 Alexander Vasilievich Krivoshein, assistant to General Wrangel for civilian affairs, General Peter Nikolaevich Wrangel, General Pavel Nikolaevich Shatilov, Chief of Staff to General Wrangel. 37.1 General Evgenii Karlovich Miller. 37.2 General Abram Mikhailovich Dragomirov. 37.3 Outside the St. Alexander Nevskii Cathedral in Paris on a Sunday. 37.4 Samples of Globachev’s watercolors. 37.5 The last portrait photo of the General, ca. 1940. 37.6 Sofia Nikolaevna Globacheva in 1947.
Translator’s Preface
Over a decade ago, I was home in the evening when the telephone rang. I answered, and the voice on the other end introduced himself and asked if I had any information on General K. I. Globachev. I responded that I knew a lot about the general because he was my maternal grandfather. Thus began my acquaintance with Dr. Jonathan Daly, Professor of History at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His call prompted me to search through family materials, most of which were in boxes not opened in years. I discovered a treasure trove of photos and letters, some of which were faded with age, but others still in good condition, and also th

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