Summary of Libby Copeland s The Lost Family
39 pages
English

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris

Summary of Libby Copeland's The Lost Family , livre ebook

-

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus
39 pages
English

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus

Description

Please note: This is a companion version & not the original book.
Sample Book Insights:
#1 Alice Collins Plebuch is a retired teacher who loves to sew. She is very short, and her grandchildren call her Grandma Nerd for her love of technology. She warned me not to take my shoes off, because sewing pins were scattered all over her house.
#2 Alice’s brain was trained to solve problems and find solutions years before she was asked to answer the most important question of all. She was not wealthy when she was growing up, so she put herself through college by washing dishes and tutoring kids in math and sewing her own clothes.
#3 Alice was a career woman in the field of information systems and data processing. She was promoted constantly, and she always made sure the systems she worked on were better. She was also an early adopter of new technologies.
#4 Alice had long had questions about her family. Her mother, who was also named Alice, was into genealogy, and kept an old family bible from the 1840s with birth, death, and marriage notations that traced back her English roots.

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 15 août 2022
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9798822589476
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 1 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0200€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

Insights on Libby Copeland's The Lost Family
Contents Insights from Chapter 1 Insights from Chapter 2 Insights from Chapter 3 Insights from Chapter 4 Insights from Chapter 5 Insights from Chapter 6 Insights from Chapter 7 Insights from Chapter 8 Insights from Chapter 9 Insights from Chapter 10 Insights from Chapter 11 Insights from Chapter 12 Insights from Chapter 13 Insights from Chapter 14 Insights from Chapter 15 Insights from Chapter 16 Insights from Chapter 17
Insights from Chapter 1



#1

Alice Collins Plebuch is a retired teacher who loves to sew. She is very short, and her grandchildren call her Grandma Nerd for her love of technology. She warned me not to take my shoes off, because sewing pins were scattered all over her house.

#2

Alice’s brain was trained to solve problems and find solutions years before she was asked to answer the most important question of all. She was not wealthy when she was growing up, so she put herself through college by washing dishes and tutoring kids in math and sewing her own clothes.

#3

Alice was a career woman in the field of information systems and data processing. She was promoted constantly, and she always made sure the systems she worked on were better. She was also an early adopter of new technologies.

#4

Alice had long had questions about her family. Her mother, who was also named Alice, was into genealogy, and kept an old family bible from the 1840s with birth, death, and marriage notations that traced back her English roots.

#5

Jim Collins, the son of Irish immigrants, knew little of his parents. His mother had died when he was a baby, and his father had given him and his siblings away to a Catholic orphanage.

#6

When Alice began researching her father, she knew it would not be as easy as it was for her mother. She knew her father was Irish, and that he had left the orphanage as a young teenager. But she didn’t know much about his childhood or his parents.

#7

Alice was able to learn about her father’s family history, but was unable to find out much about her grandmother Katie’s death certificate. She learned that her grandmother had died of insanity.

#8

Before autosomal DNA testing came onto the market, two types of genetic testing dominated the consumer market: Y-DNA testing examines the Y chromosome a man inherits from his father’s father, and mtDNA testing examines mitochondrial DNA. They can tell you about one particular genetic line, but not about your maternal or paternal side as a whole.

#9

Alice, who was testing her DNA, noticed that her results seemed to overestimate her Scandinavian heritage. This was reassuring, but it also indicated that the company was capable of making mistakes.

#10

The majority of our DNA is identical to that of every other human being on the planet. Only a small portion of our DNA is what determines our physical appearance and characteristics, and this is what companies like Ancestry are looking at when they examine our DNA sequences.

#11

The AncestryDNA test was still in beta testing, and Alice was skeptical of its accuracy. She sent the company a nasty note explaining that her genealogy, family stories, and life experience all indicated she was Irish, Scottish, and English, but the science wasn’t up to the task yet.

#12

I had no idea how difficult it would be to solve this mystery, or how long it would take. I had no idea how many people I would pull into the effort.
Insights from Chapter 2



#1

The world of genealogy has changed dramatically since the 1980s, when Roberta Estes first got into it. DNA testing has become much cheaper and better at finding close relative matches, and now, for 99 dollars, the idly curious can stumble into genealogy.

#2

America has become a nation obsessed with genealogy. The existence of so many genealogical materials digitized, indexed, and searchable online comes from a suite of personal and cultural motivations, as well as a complex history around the search for lineage.

#3

Gregor Mendel, a priest and naturalist, developed a theory of genetic inheritance in the 1850s and ’60s. He bred garden peas in the monastery garden at Brno, and studied their traits. His work was rediscovered in 1900, and he was seen as a prophet because of all that had happened in the sciences in the decades between.

#4

The rediscovery of Mendel’s laws coincided with political and social movements advocating genetic determinism, which led to the theory of eugenics and the principles of Mendelian genetics being used to justify racism and discrimination.

#5

Eugenics was not a fringe movement; its assumptions shaped what both scientists and reformers thought they were seeing. There was panic about the degradation of the human race by the unfit.

#6

I went to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to look into their genealogy practices, which explain the importance of genealogy to members of the Church.

#7

FamilySearch, though, is not a business. It is a massive project dedicated to the idea that we’re all better off if we know our ancestors. It maintains more than five thousand family history centers around the world, and operates the website FamilySearch. org.

#8

The revolution of information about the dead is just as amazing and makes you consider the ways we’re giving up our privacy not only in this life but in the afterlife. DNA testing has made the past accessible in a way it never had seemed before.

#9

I knew that the FamilySearch libra

  • Accueil Accueil
  • Univers Univers
  • Ebooks Ebooks
  • Livres audio Livres audio
  • Presse Presse
  • BD BD
  • Documents Documents