Weedon s Skin Pathology E-Book
3354 pages
English

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris

Weedon's Skin Pathology E-Book , livre ebook

-

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus
3354 pages
English

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus

Description

Thoroughly revised and up-dated, this comprehensive, authoritative reference will help both the experienced and novice practitioner diagnose skin diseases and disorders more accurately and effectively. A superb full colour art programme illustrates the salient pathological features of both neoplastic and non-neoplastic conditions and will help the reader easily interpret key clinical and diagnostic points. This single–authored text incorporates the wealth of Dr Weedon’s own personal observations and experience in his approach to the diagnosis and interpretation of skin biopsies and is full of useful diagnostic clues and pearls. This remarkable book is an indispensable resource for all those involved in the identification and evaluation of skin disorders.
  • Encyclopedic reference work that discusses established disorders, unusual and rare disease entities as well as incompletely defined entities.
  • The book is comprehensive enough to meet the requirements of trainee and practicing dermatopathologists or pathologists when reporting on the histopathology of skin specimens.
  • A single authored text that presents an internationally recognized master diagnostician’s personal philosophy and skill in dealing with the diagnosis of skin biopsies.Provides a uniformity, clarity and internal consistency of approach and style that other books cannot match.
  • Over 1,200 large-sized, high quality illustrations.
  • Will facilitate an accurate diagnosis by accurately reproducing in the book what is seen through the microscope and thereby help identify the characteristic features of the lesion demonstrated.
  • For many of the features listed there will be practical advice on pitfalls and how to avoid them drawn from Dr Weedon’s unrivalled personal experience.Will facilitate the daily practice of dermatopathology and save the practitioner a lot of time and money.
  • Tables and boxes that organize diseases into groups, synthesize diagnostic criteria and list differential diagnoses makes the book user friendly and the information easy-to-access.
  • Remarkably authoritative, comprehensive, current and relevant reference list for each entity. There are over 35,000 references in the text.This degree of inclusivity facilitates the identification of both key articles and more rare and unusual reports. References only available online in this single volume version.
  • New sections on treatment that highlight recent treatment trials and guidelines.
  • Clinical descriptions updated.
  • Brand new illustrations incorporated throughout.
  • 14,000 new references.
  • Latest IHC and molecular techniques set within context of histopathological diagnosis.
  • OMIM (online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) numbers added for all relevant diseases to provide access to continous update on the scientific basis of hereditary disease.
  • Text and images available online via Expert Consult.

Sujets

Ebooks
Savoirs
Medecine
Hyaluronan
Neoplasm
Benign fibrous histiocytoma
Seborrheic keratosis
Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans
Lichen sclerosus
Inborn error of metabolism
Sebacic acid
Hyperpigmentation
Supernumerary nipple
Nevus
Urticaria
Lichen planus
Hemangioma
Cutaneous conditions
Elastin
Cellulitis
Melanoma
Light therapy
Basal cell carcinoma
Panniculitis
Mendelian Inheritance in Man
Vasculitis
Immunodeficiency
Ichthyosis vulgaris
Ichthyosis
Lysosomal storage disease
Blackhead
Amyloidosis
Erythema
Xanthoma
Itch
Fibrous connective tissue
Renal cell carcinoma
Folliculitis
Sarcoptes scabiei
Squamous cell carcinoma
Arthralgia
Parasitic disease
Biopsy
Hypersensitivity
Box jellyfish
Epidermis
Lesion
Carcinoma
Multiple myeloma
Lipoma
Sarcoidosis
Lipodystrophy
Adenocarcinoma
Extracellular matrix
Alopecia
List of human parasitic diseases
Cyst
Alopecia areata
Metastasis
Tissue (biology)
Impetigo
Porphyria
Dermatology
Anaphylaxis
Edema
Skin neoplasm
Eczema
Obesity
Melanocytic nevus
Melanin
Parasitism
Infection
United Kingdom
Tuberculosis
Systemic scleroderma
Radiation therapy
Paranasal sinuses
Mechanics
Genetic disorder
Chemotherapy
Collagen
Albinism
Antibody
Antibacterial
Amoeboid
Arthrodermataceae
Eczéma
Cubozoa
Calcification
Scleroderma
Antibodies
Pathology
Pemphigus
Sarcopte
Coral
États-Unis
Infliximab
PubMed
Parasites
Acanthosis nigricans
Neurosyphilis
Lésion
Australia
Impétigo
Viewpoint
Méthotrexate
Blister
Vitiligo
Ulcération
Pustule
Héritage mendélien chez l'Homme
Prednisone
Contact
Mutation
Mite
Treponema pallidum
Inflammation
Acné
Maladie infectieuse
Psoriasis
Nematoda
Zinc
Copyright
Virus
Royaume-Uni
Ghana
Epidermis (anatomía)
Mucocele
Derecho de autor
United States of America
Herpes zóster
Vitíligo
Rizópodo
Herencia Mendeliana en el Hombre
Lesión
Eccema
Reino Unido
Actinic elastosis
Hodgkin's lymphoma
Cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis
Mucinosis
Septal panniculitis
Trichoepithelioma
Guttate psoriasis
Alopecia mucinosa
Spindle cell lipoma
Pseudopelade of Brocq
Pemphigus foliaceus
Myocardial infarction
Nematode
Arthropod
Spongiosis
Kaposi's sarcoma
Protozoa
Fungus
Lichenoid eruption
Chickenpox
Acne
Lupus erythematosus
Viral disease
Bacterial infection
Ulceration
Collagen disease
MITES
Benignity
Rickettsiosis
Types of volcanic eruptions
Papular mucinosis
Schwannoma
Neuroendocrine tumor
Androgenic alopecia
AIDS
Granuloma annulare
Necrobiosis
Angiokeratoma
Pyogenic granuloma
Morphea
Mucous cyst of the oral mucosa
Erythema nodosum
Neuroma
Bullous pemphigoid
Atopic dermatitis
Dermatitis
Connective tissue disease
Parasitic worm
Autoantibody
Dysplastic nevus
Trombicula
Neuroblastoma
Photosensitivity
Mycosis
Elastic fiber
Mycosis fungoides
Epidermoid cyst

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 30 octobre 2009
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9780702047749
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 9 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,1105€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

Table of Contents

Cover Image
COPYRIGHT
PREFACE
1. An approach to the interpretation of skin biopsies
2. Diagnostic clues
3. The lichenoid reaction pattern (‘interface dermatitis’)
4. The psoriasiform reaction pattern
5. The spongiotic reaction pattern
6. The vesiculobullous reaction pattern
7. The granulomatous reaction pattern
8. The vasculopathic reaction pattern
9. Disorders of epidermal maturation and keratinization
10. Disorders of pigmentation
11. Disorders of collagen
12. Disorders of elastic tissue
13. Cutaneous mucinoses
14. Cutaneous deposits
15. Diseases of cutaneous appendages
16. Cysts, sinuses, and pits
17. Panniculitis
18. Metabolic and storage diseases
19. Miscellaneous conditions
20. Cutaneous drug reactions
21. Reactions to physical agents
22. Cutaneous infections and infestations – histological patterns
23. Bacterial and rickettsial infections
24. Spirochetal infections
25. Mycoses and algal infections
26. Viral diseases
27. Protozoal infections
28. Marine injuries
29. Helminth infestations
30. Arthropod-induced diseases
31. Tumors of the epidermis
32. Lentigines, nevi, and melanomas
33. Tumors of cutaneous appendages
34. Tumors and tumor-like proliferations of fibrous and related tissues
35. Tumors of fat
36. Tumors of muscle, cartilage, and bone
37. Neural and neuroendocrine tumors
38. Vascular tumors
39. Cutaneous metastases
40. Cutaneous infiltrates – non-lymphoid
41. Cutaneous infiltrates – lymphomatous and leukemic
Index



COPYRIGHT


© 2010, Elsevier Limited All rights reserved.
First Edition 1997
Second Edition 2002
The right of David Weedon to be identified as author of this work has been asserted by him in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988.
No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Permissions may be sought directly from Elsevier's Rights Department: phone: (+1) 215 239 3804 (US) or (+44) 1865 843830 (UK); fax: (+44) 1865 853333; e-mail: healthpermissions@elsevier.com . You may also complete your request on-line via the Elsevier website at http://www.elsevier.com/permissions .
ISBN: 978-0-7020-3485-5
British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data
A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library
Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data
A catalog record for this book is available from the Library of Congress
Notice
Medical knowledge is constantly changing. Standard safety precautions must be followed, but as new research and clinical experience broaden our knowledge, changes in treatment and drug therapy may become necessary or appropriate. Readers are advised to check the most current product information provided by the manufacturer of each drug to be administered to verify the recommended dose, the method and duration of administration, and contraindications. It is the responsibility of the practitioner, relying on experience and knowledge of the patient, to determine dosages and the best treatment for each individual patient. Neither the Publisher nor the author assumes any liability for any injury and/or damage to persons or property arising from this publication.
The Publisher


Printed in China
Last digit is the print number: 9   8   7   6   5   4   3   2   1
For Elsevier
Commissioning Editor: Michael Houston
Development Editor: Ben Davie
Editorial Assistant: Kirsten Lowsen
Project Manager: Joannah Duncan
Design: Stewart Larking
Illustration Manager: Bruce Hogarth
Marketing Manager(s) (UK/USA): John Canelon/Radha Mawrie



PREFACE
Completing the third edition of this book has been a Herculean task, not made any easier by a high reporting load, another myocardial infarct in July 2008, and my computer illiteracy in an era when competency in this skill is almost essential for proper functioning as a dermatopathologist and author. I must thank my colleagues, particularly Dr Richard Williamson and Dr Nick Mellick who commenced work at midnight during my absences. They also did some reference and OMIM hunting for me.
This new era is not without its shortcomings. Some of the medical graduates seem to lack the breadth and depth of knowledge that characterized earlier generations, but this reduced knowledge does not seem to interfere with the ability of recent graduates to practice medicine. One recent graduate proudly told me that she had ‘Googled her way through medical school’, something that I could never achieve. Many pathologists are now ‘PubMed-ing’ their way through the daily sign-out. As a consequence, the need for a comprehensive textbook in any field has probably lessened. Notwithstanding this view, the last edition of this book contained a valuable collection of references, and as this is likely to be the last edition of this book by the current author, it seemed appropriate to build on, rather than purge, this bank of references. PubMed-ing one's way to a diagnosis is seemingly not without its problems. To use an analogy from the old days of warfare: ‘if one feeds in the wrong coordinates, one hits the wrong target’. Hopefully, this comment does not sound like ‘sour grapes’ from an acknowledged troglodyte, unable to do the same. In a similar vein, the undersigned marvels at the reliance placed on immunoperoxidase markers to reach a presumptively-correct diagnosis. Automation of these tests appears to have lessened rather than strengthened their specificity. It is often forgotten that the specificity of an antibody for a particular tumor is only as specific as the last paper to be published. I watch with interest as D2-40, one of the newer markers, goes the same way as vimentin, CD34, and CD10 before it.
Since the last edition of this book, Professor W. St C. (Bill) Symmers, who was instrumental in getting me to write the precursor volume to this book, has ‘passed on’. He was truly inspirational, and from the old school of language perfection. I still recall vividly his hand-written comments on some proofs admonishing me for my use of the word ‘prominent’ to describe the magnitude of an inflammatory infiltrate. Hopefully not too many ‘prominents’ have crept into this edition. The recent death of A. Bernard (Bernie) Ackerman has been described as the ‘end of an era’. Few others contributed so much to dermatopathology. Other mentors of mine have now retired, some more fully than others, such as John Sullivan, John Kerr, Robin Cooke, and Alistair Burry. Hopefully I am wiser for their counsel, and for their interest in my career. The work of Professor Kerr in establishing apoptosis as a concept was monumental, as evidenced by its basic role in many aspects of carcinogenesis. As a consequence of my interest in this concept since the 1970s, I still cringe when I hear the term ‘necrotic keratinocytes’ used for apoptotic cells.
Medical writing style has also changed enormously in the last 20 years. No longer are the titles of articles short and succinct. Some are mini-abstracts. Everyone seems to be a co-author these days; 17 authors for a letter to the Editor seems somewhat excessive, but I have heard many times the justification for this event. Also, the possessive apostrophe is going the way of the dodo. There seems little point in retaining eponymous designations without one, although I appreciate the reasoning that the person does not own the disease. The possessive apostrophe has been with us since the 17th century, so it will be retained here for syndromes that have traditionally been named in this style. This edition has sections on treatment. As I am not a dermatologist, doses of drugs have not been given. These sections are intended to highlight recent treatment trials and guidelines as well as some successful treatments of an anecdotal nature.
I would like to thank and acknowledge the assistance once again of Dr Geoffrey Strutton, and for this edition, the help of Dr Adam Rubin for some of the photomicrographs. I also thank Alyson Coxon and Cleo Wilkinson for their assistance. Michael Houston, Executive Publisher at Elsevier Ltd, and Ben Davie, the Development Editor, provided sound advice. Their patience during the long gestation period of this volume was amazing. Finally, once again my secretary and friend Pam Kent typed every word of the text and all the references and tables, not to mention her role as my proxy computer operator.
David Weedon

Brisbane, Australia



1. An approach to the interpretation of skin biopsies

Introduction 4

Major tissue reaction patterns 4

The lichenoid reaction pattern (‘interface dermatitis’) 4

The psoriasiform reaction pattern 5

The spongiotic reaction pattern 6

The vesiculobullous reaction pattern 7

The granulomatous reaction pattern 7

The vasculopathic reaction pattern 11

Combined reaction patterns 12

Minor tissue reaction patterns 12

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis 12

Acantholytic dyskeratosis 12

Cornoid lamellation 12

Papillomatosis (‘church-spiring’) 15

Acral angiofibromas 15

Eosinophilic cellulitis with ‘flame figures’ 15

Transepithelial elimination 15

Patterns of inflammation 16

Superficial perivascular inflammatio

  • Univers Univers
  • Ebooks Ebooks
  • Livres audio Livres audio
  • Presse Presse
  • Podcasts Podcasts
  • BD BD
  • Documents Documents