A Bird Watchers Note Book - Woodcock and Snipe
11 pages
English

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A Bird Watchers Note Book - Woodcock and Snipe

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En savoir plus
11 pages
English

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Description

This text contains a collection of the author's notes on woodcock and snipe. This is an account of the author's personal experiences with these birds primarily on his own land, and includes a wealth of information from their habits and habitats, to their history, diets, and ailments. This is a great little book sure to appeal to anyone with an interest in woodcock and snipe, very much worthy of a place in any collection of ornithological literature. Many antique books such as this are increasingly rare and costly. We are proud to republish 'A Bird Watchers Note Book - Woodcock And Snipe' here complete with a new introduction to bird watching.

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Publié par
Date de parution 16 octobre 2020
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9781528762892
Langue English

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0017€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Exrait

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A BIRD WATCHER S NOTE BOOK
WOODCOCK AND SNIPE
BY
J. W. SEIGNE
Copyright 2013 Read Books Ltd.
This book is copyright and may not be reproduced or copied in any way without the express permission of the publisher in writing
British Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data
A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library
Contents
Bird Watching
WOODCOCK AND SNIPE
Bird Watching
Bird watching is, very simply, the observation of birds as a recreational activity. It can be done with the naked eye, through binoculars and telescopes, or by listening for bird sounds. Although characterised as watching , bird watching often involves a significant auditory component, as many bird species are more easily detected and identified by ear than by eye. Recognition of bird vocalizations - bird listening is an important part of a birder s toolkit. Many birdwatchers occupy themselves with observing local species (birding in their local patch ), but may also make specific trips to observe birds in other locales. Birdwatchers partake in many differing activities, including monitoring and conservation, especially taking part in censuses of bird populations and migratory patterns. Such activities are incredibly important, a form of citizen science , they assist in identifying environment threats to the well being of birds, thereby raising awareness of environmental issues more broadly. Birding can also be a competitive event, with events encouraging individuals or teams to accumulate large numbers of species within a specified time or area. There is more to bird watching than first meets the eye!
The whole etymology of bird watching is a highly contested area. The first recorded use of the term birdwatcher was in 1891, and bird was introduced as a verb in 1918. The term birding was also used for the practice of fowling or hunting with firearms as in Shakespeare s The Merry Wives of Windsor (1602): She laments sir . . . her husband goes this morning a-birding. The terms birding and bird watching are today used by some interchangeably, although some participants prefer birding , partly because it does not exclude the auditory aspects of enjoying birds. At the most basic level, the distinction between the two terms is perceived as one of dedication or intensity, though this is a subjective differentiation. Generally, self-described birders perceive themselves to be more versed in minutiae like identification (aural and visual), molt, distribution, migration timing, and habitat usage. Whereas these dedicated birders may often travel specifically in search of birds, birdwatchers have been described by some enthusiasts as having a more limited scope, perhaps not venturing far from their own yards or local parks to view birds.
Twitching is another common term, of British derivation, used to mean the pursuit of a previously located rare bird. In North America it is more often called chasing , though the British usage is starting to catch on there, especially among younger birders. It was originally used in the 1950s, for the nervous behaviour of Howard Medhurst, a British pioneer of the activity. The term twitcher , sometimes misapplied as a synonym for birder, is reserved for those who travel long distances to see a rare bird that would then be ticked , or counted on a list. Prior terms for those who chased rarities were pot-hunter, tally-hunter , or tick-hunter . The main goal of twitching is often to accumulate species on one s lists, with some participants actively challenging one another to accumulate the longest species list.
The earliest interest in observing birds for their aesthetic rather than utilitarian (mainly food) value is traced to the late eighteenth century in the works of Gilbert White, Thomas Bewick, George Montagu and John Clare. The study of birds and natural history in general became increasingly prevalent in the Britain during the Victorian Era, often associated with collection, eggs and later skins being the artefacts of interest.

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