Race and Rurality in the Global Economy
181 pages
English

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181 pages
English

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Description

Issues of migration, environment, rurality, and the visceral "politics of place" and "space" have occupied center stage in recent electoral political struggles in the United States and Europe, suffused by an antiglobalization discourse that has come to resonate with Euro-American peoples. Race and Rurality in the Global Economy suggests that this present fractious global politics begs for closer attention to be paid to the deep-rooted conditions and outcomes of globalization and development. From multiple viewpoints the contributors to this volume propose ways of understanding the ongoing processes of globalization that configure peoples and places via a politics of rurality in a capitalist world economy, and through an optics of raciality that intersects with class, gender, identity, land, and environment. In tackling the dynamics of space and place, their essays address matters such as the heightened risks and multiple states of insecurity in the global economy; the new logics of expulsion and primitive accumulation dynamics shaping a new "savage sorting"; patterns of resistance and transformation in the face of globalization's political and environmental changes; the steady decline in the livelihoods of people of color globally and their deepened vulnerabilities; and the complex reconstitution of systemic and lived racialization within these processes. This book is an invitation to ask whether our dystopia in present politics can be disentangled from the deepening sense of "white fragility" in the context of the historical power of globalization's raced effects.
List of Tables and Illustrations

Foreword
Philip McMichael

Introduction
Michaeline A. Crichlow, Patricia Northover, and Juan Giusti-Cordero

1. Global Economies and Historical Change: Rethinking Social Struggles and Transformations in Africa’s Zones of Rurality (1500–1800)
Ray A. Kea

2. Making Development through Rural Initiative “Unthinkable”: Tanzania in the Time of Ujamaa
James Giblin

3. Racialization and the Historical Production of Contemporary Land Rights Inequalities in Upland Northern Thailand
Daniel B. Ahlquist and Amanda Flaim

4. Making Things for Living, and Living a Life with Things
Olivia Maria Gomes da Cunha

5. Race and Class Marginalization in the Globalization of the Rice Industry
Wazir Mohamed

6. At the Margins of Citizenship: Oil, Poverty, and Race in Esmeraldas, Ecuador
Gabriela Valdivia

7. Racing the Reservation: Rethinking Resistance and Development in the Navajo Nation
Dana E. Powell

8. Rediscovering Afro-American Ruralities: The Mississippi Delta and Loiza (Puerto Rico) as Cultural Hot Spots
Juan Giusti-Cordero

9. Race in the Reconstruction of Rural Society in the Cotton South since the Civil War
Jeannie Whayne

Contributors
Index

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 26 septembre 2018
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9781438471327
Langue English

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0005€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Exrait

Race and Rurality in the Global Economy
FERNAND BRAUDEL CENTER STUDIES IN HISTORICAL SOCIAL SCIENCE
Series Editor: Richard E. Lee
The Fernand Braudel Center Studies in Historical Social Science will publish works that address theoretical and empirical questions produced by scholars in or through the Fernand Braudel Center or who share its approach and concerns. It specifically seeks to promote works that contribute to the development of the world-systems perspective engaging a holistic and relational vision of the world—the modern world-system—implicit in historical social science, which at once takes into consideration structures (long-term regularities) and change (history). With the intellectual boundaries within the sciences/social sciences/humanities structure collapsing in the work scholars actually do, this series will offer a venue for a wide range of research that confronts the dilemmas of producing relevant accounts of historical processes in the context of the rapidly changing structures of both the social and academic world. The series will include monographs, colloquia, and collections of essays organized around specific themes.
VOLUMES IN THIS SERIES:
Questioning Nineteenth-Century Assumptions about Knowledge, I: Determinism
Richard E. Lee, editor
Questioning Nineteenth-Century Assumptions about Knowledge, II: Reductionism
Richard E. Lee, editor
Questioning Nineteenth-Century Assumptions about Knowledge, III: Dualism
Richard E. Lee, editor
The Longue Durée and World-Systems Analysis
Richard E. Lee, editor
New Frontiers of Slavery
Dale W. Tomich, editor
Slavery in the Circuit of Sugar: Martinique and the World-Economy, 1830–1848
Dale W. Tomich
The Politics of the Second Slavery
Dale W. Tomich, editor
The Trade in the Living
Luiz Felipe de Alencastro
Race and Rurality in the Global Economy
Michaeline A. Crichlow, Patricia Northover, and Juan Giusti-Cordero, editors
Race and Rurality in the Global Economy
Edited by
Michaeline A. Crichlow, Patricia Northover, and Juan Giusti-Cordero

FERNAND BRAUDEL CENTER STUDIES IN HISTORICAL SOCIAL SCIENCE
On the cover: Traditional round mud and thatch houses forming a family compound in Northern Ghana, near Tamale. Photo by ZMS. Wikimedia Commons.
Published by State University of New York Press, Albany
© 2018 State University of New York
All rights reserved
Printed in the United States of America
No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without written permission. No part of this book may be stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means including electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tape, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise without the prior permission in writing of the publisher.
For information, contact State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
www.sunypress.edu
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Names: Crichlow, Michaeline A., editor. | Northover, Patricia, editor. | Giusti-Cordero, Juan A., editor.
Title: Race and rurality in the global economy / edited by Michaeline A. Crichlow, Patricia Northover, and Juan Giusti-Cordero.
Description: Albany : State University of New York Press, [2018] | Series: SUNY series, Fernand Braudel Center studies in historical social science | Includes bibliographical references and index.
Identifiers: LCCN 2017053070 | ISBN 9781438471310 (hardcover : alk. paper) | ISBN 9781438471327 (ebook)
Subjects: LCSH: Rural development. | Rural population—Economic conditions. | Race—Economic aspects. | Globalization.
Classification: LCC HN49.C6 R325 2018 | DDC 330.9173/4—dc23
LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2017053070
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CONTENTS
List of Tables and Illustrations
Foreword
Philip McMichael
Introduction
Michaeline A. Crichlow, Patricia Northover, and Juan Giusti-Cordero
1 Global Economies and Historical Change: Rethinking Social Struggles and Transformations in Africa’s Zones of Rurality (1500–1800)
Ray A. Kea
2 Making Development through Rural Initiative “Unthinkable”: Tanzania in the Time of Ujamaa
James Giblin
3 Racialization and the Historical Production of Contemporary Land Rights Inequalities in Upland Northern Thailand
Daniel B. Ahlquist and Amanda Flaim
4 Making Things for Living, and Living a Life with Things
Olivia Maria Gomes da Cunha
5 Race and Class Marginalization in the Globalization of the Rice Industry
Wazir Mohamed
6 At the Margins of Citizenship: Oil, Poverty, and Race in Esmeraldas, Ecuador
Gabriela Valdivia
7 Racing the Reservation: Rethinking Resistance and Development in the Navajo Nation
Dana E. Powell
8 Rediscovering Afro-American Ruralities: The Mississippi Delta and Loíza (Puerto Rico) as Cultural Hot Spots
Juan Giusti-Cordero
9 Race in the Reconstruction of Rural Society in the Cotton South since the Civil War
Jeannie Whayne
Contributors
Index
TABLES AND ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure 3.1 Land rights in northern uplands, by ethnicity of household, 2010
Figure 4.1 Bolls of pemba doti , September 2015
Figure 4.2 Foodstuffs from the goon in the Cottica, after a workday
Table 5.1 Number of rice farmers in Guyana, 1954, autumn crop
Table 5.2 Number of rice farmers/cultivation area in Guyana, first crop, 2009
Map 6.1 Map of location of case studies
Map 8.1 The Mississippi Delta, US Geological Survey
Map 8.2 Puerto Rico, showing the Municipality of Loíza
Map 8.3 The Municipality of Loíza, reflecting present-day urbanization
Table 8.1 Cultivated acreage (improved land) in the core counties of the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta, 1850–1900
Map 8.4 Barrios in the Municipality of Loíza, showing the Los Frailes area
Map 8.5 Birthplaces of recorded blues performers, 1890–1920
Figure 8.1 Mouth of the Rio Grande de Loíza
Figure 8.2 North-south view of the cane fields in the eastern section of Loíza
Figure 8.3 Western section of Loiza (Piñones), on the west side of the Rio Grande de Loíza
FOREWORD
I n organizing the Race and Rurality in the Global Economy Conference at Duke University in spring 2015, the organizers, Michaeline Crichlow, Anne-Maria Makhulu, Patricia Northover, and Caela O’Connell, sought to link historic agrarian transformations to a reformulation of “development” as a process with substantive rural and racial foundations. This is a prescient intervention that refocuses attention on the racial implications of the rural-urban divide in development outcomes and intentions. By advocating a longue durée methodological approach, the organizers encourage a scholarly taking stock of the racialized history of the modern world. Such an approach is quite undeveloped in the chronicling of the rise of capitalist modernity, and what is outstanding about this set of essays is the way in which historic divisions of labor, enclosures, and displacements construct and/or implicate rural spaces in unique ways as havens and/or hells for racially marginalized peoples.
Each of the chapters answers this proposal in distinctive ways, providing an overall kaleidoscopic glimpse of the multiple experiences of disadvantaged communities across racialized time/space relations.
The overall theme here is entirely apposite in an era of coordinated assault on so-called “people of the land” in the contemporary “land grab” (Liberti 2013). The organizers’ insistence on the longue durée perspective enables recognition of the historical legacy of enclosure—which has etched the devaluation of rural communities into the process of “emptying of the countryside” as an instrument of racial domination. Interestingly, classical Marxism’s approach to the “agrarian question” treats the fate of the peasantry as an economic question, ignoring its racial/ethnic dimensions and to all intents and purposes naturalizing a process of “de-peasantization” (Araghi 1996; McMichael 2013). The intent of the organizers is to reopen this question to historical and cultural analysis that both transcends economism and pays attention to specific historical experiences faced (and acted upon) by racialized rural inhabitants.
Karl Marx’s observation that slavery was the “pedestal” of wage labor was not simply a theoretical statement regarding the stimulus of the slave trade to the rise of industrial capitalism (1965). It also signaled the centrality of slavery to capitalism (Tomich 2004; Eric Williams 1944)—a relationship that has not only endured with countless forms of forced labor still in existence, but importantly for this project underscoring the racialized foundations of capitalist modernity. Given present political circumstances across the world, and especially in the United States, it is not difficult to view racism as the more significant and durable legacy of modernity than democracy (cf. Winant 2001). There is an irony in conventional historiography of modernity—perhaps best expressed in the disjuncture between Barrington Moore’s methodological nationalist account of the history of English democracy depending on the elimination of the English peasantry (1966), paired with Mike Davis’s world-historical account of how the Indian peasantry was supplying 20 percent of England’s bread by the turn of the twentieth century

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