Scientific Bibliography of the Drakensberg, Maloti and Adjacent Lowlands, A
552 pages
English

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552 pages
English
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Description

This bibliography includes scientific articles on the Drakensberg, Maloti and Adjacent Lowlands published between 1808 and 2019. Although focussing on material appearing in accredited journals, there is such a wealth of information in the form of unpublished, yet traceable, reports, documents, presentations and dissertations, these are also included. The bibliography has two parts – a complete list arranged alphabetically, and the same references arranged in 33 different disciplines. These range from Palaeobotany with 17 entries, to Rock Art with 502 entries.

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Publié par
Date de parution 19 avril 2021
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9781928424451
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 10 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,1000€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

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ascientific bibliography of the DRAKENSBERG, MALOTI& ADJACENT LOWLANDS
Rodney Moffett
ascientific bibliography of the DRAKENSBERG, MALOTI& ADJACENT LOWLANDS
Rodney Moffett
AScientiIcBibliography of the Drakensberg, Maloti & Adjacent Lowlands
Published by Sun Media Bloemfontein (Pty) Ltd.
Imprint: SunBonani Scholar
All rights reserved
Copyright ©2020 Sun Media Bloemfontein and the author
This publication was subjected to an independent double-blind peer evaluation by the publisher.
The author and the publisher have made every effort to obtain permission for and acknowledge the use of copyrighted material. Refer all inquiries to the publisher.
No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any electronic, photographic or mechanical means, including photocopying and recording on record, tape or laser disk, on microfilm, via the Internet, by e-mail, or by any other information storage and retrieval system, without prior written permission by the publisher.
Views reflected in this publication are not necessarily those of the publisher.
ISBN 978-1-928424-44-4 ISBN 978-1-928424-45-1 (e-book) https://doi.org/10.18820/9781928424451
Set in Optimum 8/11 Cover design, typesetting and production by Sun Media Bloemfontein Cover image: Emil Von Maltitz. Cathedral Peak Range, Kwazulu-Natal.
Research, academic and reference works are published under this imprint in print and electronic format.
This printed copy can be ordered directly from: media@sunbonani.co.za The e-book is available at the following link: https://doi.org/10.18820/9781928424451
Table of Contents
FOREWORD ................................................................................................................................................
INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ..........................................................................................................................
PART1:COMPLETELIST..........................................................................................................................
i
v
xi
1
PART 2: SECTIONS ..................................................................................................................................... 249
Section1
ANTHROPOLOGY ...................................................................................................................... 249
ARCHAEOLOGY .......................................................................................................................... 253
ROCK ART ..................................................................................................................................... 266
PALAEOBOTANY ......................................................................................................................... 292
PALAEONTOLOGY ..................................................................................................................... 293
Section2
BIODIVERSITY ............................................................................................................................... 303
APPLIED BOTANY ....................................................................................................................... 308
PLANT ECOLOGY ........................................................................................................................ 321
FIRE .................................................................................................................................................. 324
VEGETATION ................................................................................................................................ 330
GRASSLAND ................................................................................................................................. 339
WETLANDS .................................................................................................................................... 347
FLORA ............................................................................................................................................. 353
PLANT SYSTEMATICS/TAXONOMY ....................................................................................... 364
FORESTRY ...................................................................................................................................... 373
HYDROBIOLOGY & LIMNOLOGY ......................................................................................... 377
SOIL SCIENCE ...............................................................................................................................
GEOMORPHOLOGY ..................................................................................................................
MINERALOGY AND MINING ..................................................................................................
GEOLOGY .....................................................................................................................................
MAMMALOGY .............................................................................................................................
ORNITHOLOGY ..........................................................................................................................
ICTHYOLOGY ...............................................................................................................................
HERPETOLOGY ............................................................................................................................
INVERTEBRATES ...........................................................................................................................
516
492
434
471
BEARDED VULTURE ............................................................................................................
ICE RAT ....................................................................................................................................
SPIRAL ALOE ..........................................................................................................................
MALOTI MINNOW ..............................................................................................................
DESCRIPTIVE HISTORY ..............................................................................................................
ICONIC BERG BIOTA .................................................................................................................
SOCIAL ISSUES .............................................................................................................................
DISSERTATIONS ...........................................................................................................................
RECREATION AND TOURISM ..................................................................................................
LEGAL ISSUES ...............................................................................................................................
CIVIL ENGINEERING ...................................................................................................................
MOUNTAIN MANAGEMENT ...................................................................................................
METEOROLOGY (CLIMATE & WEATHER) ............................................................................
HYDROLOGY ...............................................................................................................................
392
397
505
Section5
500
512
530
508
453
489
482
446
474
401
422
380
530
531
530
534
Section8
Section3
Section6
Section7
Section4
F
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Mountain research is passion-driven research. Regardless of the field of discipline – ecological, anthropological, physical – mountains draw specific people across all disciplines, often to leading to a life-long obsession. This Bibliography shows how the Maloti–Drakensberg has done this, wooing generation after generation of people from across racial, tribal and linguistic groups to generate a body of incredibly valuable work collated in this Bibliography.
In an era where there is a global drive to integrate disciplines, mountains help us along: it is much easier, perhaps, to drive an inter-disciplinary group around something iconic and inspiring as mountains than in other fields? Perhaps islands and the ocean come close! Regardless of whether or not this is so, mountains lift us out of our research silos into a common cause.
2 Spanning 40,000 km , straddling two countries, and comprising great internal socio-ecological complexity, the Maloti–Drakensberg is immense. It offers a vibrant and challenging living laboratory for exploration, research, and translation of results into policy and practice – ultimately leading to the holy grails of trans-disciplinarity and sustainability. Although easy to define as an orographic entity, the Maloti–Drakensberg is extremely variable within itself. In KwaZulu-Natal we have the eastern escarpment frontage, made famous by the Ukhahlamba–Drakensberg Park and UNESCO World Heritage Site. In the Eastern Cape we have the coldest and least-researched components, comprising enticing destinations for the adventurous academic. In Lesotho we have vast, snow-flecked alpine plateaux dissected by steep gorges and arid valleys, with their own dramatic western escarpment – the latter perhaps underappreciated, except by local communities basking in its afternoon sun or waiting for a violent summer thunderstorm to pass.
The socio-economic landscape varies tremendously – a complex mosaic of incredibly poor rural communities living simple agrarian lives, modern economic activities, massive engineering works (including dams and open-cast mines), commercial farming and forestry, vast protected area networks, and areas close to ecosystem collapse. All this in the shadow of a complex and fluid transboundary relationship between South Africa and Lesotho. It is a region where peoples and cultures have met, fought and mingled over the past 200 years; where terrified clans fleeing King Shaka’s persecution fled seeking refuge and slipped out of desperation, into cannibalism; where intricate cross-cultural conflicts played out between the San and later Nguni and European groups; and where the modern Basotho nation was
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A scientific bibliography of the Drakensberg, Maloti & Adjacent Lowlands
melded under Morena (King) Moshoeshoe. The soaring ramparts of the escarpment look out over diverse groups going about their daily business – Zulus in the east, Sothos in the centre and west, Xhosas, Griquas and Pondos in the south, with Europeans and Asians scattered in between. The Maloti–Drakensberg could be said to be a place of both unity and division, and perhaps even of modern irony: Big South Africa increasingly dependent on water from Little Lesotho, and it might be said (in an era of rapid climate change) that he who has the water has the last word….
It is comprehensive and excellently compiled Bibliographies such as these that enable us to stand on the shoulders of giants – past and present – as we move rapidly into a future of major global change and uncertainty, in which it is increasingly important to integrate disciplines to find real-time solutions. Whether the conundrum is political, ecological, biophysical or social, past research guides us when we consider the future. After all, ‘there is nothing new under the sun’! In addition, such Bibliographies provide an opportunity for us to avoid the mistakes of the past. This Bibliography will help us to build on the efforts of others as we strive towards addressing complex problems – ‘Wicked Problems’ – in the Maloti–Drakensberg, problems that threaten the unique services this area provides; its irreplaceable genetic diversity; and the socio-cultural landscape that has responded to the call of these mountains over centuries. It will also help us in our mission to grow a robust community of practice for the sustainable development of southern African mountains, and to facilitate better links between local actors in academia, traditional and elected governance, non-governmental organisations, and local communities.
In terms of research in the Maloti–Drakensberg, the Afromontane Research Unit (ARU) – based at the Qwaqwa Campus of the University of the Free State (UFS) – is a relatively new kid on the block (the very northern corner of the Maloti–Drakensberg block to be precise!). While research groups from many other local and international universities have undertaken robust and excellent work in the Maloti–Drakensberg since the early 1900s, the ARU is the first dedicated, well-supported mountain research group focusing on inter-disciplinary research on southern African mountains. Officially founded in 2015, the ARU is still a young enterprise – well behind most other research groups who have/are running research programmes in the Maloti–Drakensberg. However, despite this regional research momentum, the region still lacks a champion to drive the development of a rigorous, regional and cross-disciplinary community of practice for southern African mountains; and to place these mountains and their needs on the international stage. The ARU has taken up this mantle, its mission being to facilitate the development and capacity-building of an African-based mountain research ‘community of practice’ of high excellence that informs global mountain research theory and practice from an African perspective. With a large internal team of some 70 academics, post-graduates and post-doctoral fellows, combined with a constellation of external research associates, collaborations and relationships, the ARU is quickly growing a regional footprint with a strong focus on its own backyard: the Maloti–Drakensberg.
Prof. Rodney Moffett – one of the longest serving academics at the QwaQwa Campus, one of our ARU Research Associates, and a living treasure of Maloti–Drakensberg knowledge – has done a fantastic job of painstakingly collating this exhaustive Bibliography. It is a labour of love, and will inspire a new generation to take up the baton for excellent research in
ii
FOREWORD
this fantastic mountain system. We are proud to publish this Bibliography under the ARU banner as a contribution to growing and consolidating mountain-passionate relationships in southern Africa, and to encourage our journey towards developing a holistic understanding and sustainable use of these iconic mountain landscapes.
As first Director of the ARU, it is my great privilege to have been invited to write this Foreword and to commend this book to the Reader.
Dr V. Ralph ClarkDirector: Afromontane Research Unit
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Dr Ed Granger, formerly of the University of Kwazulu-Natal and currently a research associate of the South African Environment Observation Network (SAEON), is an ecologist with wide experience of the Drakensberg. In an e-mail dated 9 January 2019, he stated, “What you have proposed by way of compiling a bibliography of the Drakensberg and Maloti is without doubt a mammoth task but one which-- in my opinion -- is VERY long overdue and a VERY worthwhile project which can benefit much more than the scientific communities that have any interest in the Drakensberg and the Malotis.”
The purpose then of this bibliography is to gather as many scientific articles or presentations on the Drakensberg, Maloti and adjacent Lowland as possible, to enable researchers and managers to locate references relevant to their work. Likewise, students will be able to check whether they might be duplicating any previous work. The bibliography does not include annotations. With over 5 000 entries in part 1 alone and 251 000 words over all, including annotations would have made the work unmanageable. Annotations also tend to reflect an author’s bias.
Although the bibliography focuses on published material between 1806 (Barrow) and October 2019 (Kobisi), there is such a wealth of material in the form of unpublished, yet traceable, reports, documents, presentations and dissertations, that it was decided to include these as well.
The advantage of a bibliography such as this one, over the use of the various search engines available on the internet, is that the bibliography gives a wider and more complete picture of a particular subject. In the subject lists (part 2), ancillary articles and other articles by the same author(s) may also appear, providing possible further relevant information. It also provides information like statistics (in Tables 1–3) that would not be found on the internet. Another advantage of the list is that it identifies areas or subjects that are well researched, as well as areas or subjects in need of further study.
The bibliography was a desktop endeavour using existing bibliographies, major reference works and dissertation reference lists as the primary sources. Specific specialised internet sources such as Research Gate and Academia also provided more recent information. Bibliographies consulted included the following (full citations in the Bibliography itself):
Ambrose, D.P. 1998-2015.30 of the many annotated bibliographies on various subjects in Lesotho.
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