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Diocese of Bristol Deanery Mission Enabler, Kingswood & South Gloucestershire Deanery & Priest-in-Charge, Mangotsfield This is an imaginative, varied and demanding role enabling growth by both leading in the parish of Mangotsfield and supporting churches across the deanery of Kingswood & South Gloucestershire. The parish of Mangotsfield is at the heart of the deanery which surrounds the city of Bristol to the north and east. The community in the parish also reflects the way in which the area is changing: Emersons Green, a recent new housing community, has grown out of and around the original village of Mangotsfield with its parish church, as the greater Bristol conurbation spreads
  • service to the building of the kingdom
  • spiritual life with appropriate support networks
  • deanery
  • village centre
  • bristol
  • building
  • mission
  • church
  • community

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Nombre de lectures 13
Langue English

Exrait

FREEHOLD REGIONAL
HIGH SCHOOL
DISTRICT

Scholars’ Center for the
Humanities

Honors Literature and
Arts Studies III
Course Code #202250

Approved by the Board of Education
August, 2007

Curriculum Writing Committee
Carla Lounsbury

Board of Education
Mrs. Patricia Horvath, President
Ms. Diana Cappiello, Vice-President
Mrs. Bunny Hammer
Mrs. Kathie Lavin
Mr. Ronald G. Lawson
Mrs. Joan Leimbach
Mr. Christopher Placitella
Mrs. BonnieSue Rosenwald
Mr. Michael Wright, Sr.




Central Administration
Dr. James Wasser, Superintendent
Dr. Patricia Emmerman, Assistant Superintendent
Mr. Frank Tanzini, Assistant Superintendent
Dr. Joan Nesenkar Saylor, Assistant Superintendent
Dr. Suzanne Koegler, Assistant Superintendent





Humanities Learning Center
Supervisor

Stan Koba

2


Table of Contents

Humanities Program Philosophy and Course Description 4

Course Delineation 5

Scope and Sequence 6

New Jersey Core Content Standards 8

Literature and Arts III Course Proficiencies 12

Unit I Literary Criticism 14

Unit II Elements of Style 17

Unit III Decline of the Gilded Age and Rise of Realism 19

Unit IV Transition to the Modern Age 22

Unit V Modernism Part II 25

Unit VI Existentialism, The Search for Meaning 28

Unit VII AP Test Preparation 30

Unit VIII Counterculture to Contemporary 32

Unit IX Performance Task: Independent Project 34

Works Consulted 36

Literature and Arts Texts 37

Rubrics 38
3
Humanities Program and Course Description

The Scholars' Center for the Humanities, located at Howell High School, offers a four-year program that
assists highly talented and motivated students to develop advanced research skills, superior analytical and
critical thinking skills, and sophisticated written and verbal communication skills while studying the
many facets of American culture. Students experience an intensive, interdisciplinary approach to the
liberal arts through the following course work: Literature and Arts Studies I – IV, World Cultures, US
Cultures I & II, American Culture Seminar, Process Skills I & II, Modern Music in America, Modern Art
in America, and the Philosophy of Art and Aesthetics.


The Scholars' Center for the Humanities, currently located at Howell High School, offers a program that
will prepare students for numerous professional options through a curriculum which is both broad in
scope and comprehensive in content, focusing on the American experience. Through this multifaceted
program, students develop advanced research techniques, writing acuity, and sophisticated verbal
communication skills. In addition, the center provides students with an opportunity to explore the liberal
arts in an intensive, issues-oriented, interdisciplinary approach. Areas of study in the curriculum will
include: government, history, anthropology, philosophy, thought processes, literature, language, and the
arts. A concentrated emphasis is placed on developing analytical and critical thinking skills, research
capabilities, and proficiency in written and verbal communication in addition to traditional college
preparatory course work. Upon completion of the Scholars' Center's program, the student shall have
acquired, developed, and applied the following skills: analysis and argumentation, expository,
persuasive, and creative written and verbal communication techniques, problem solving through
inquiry, research design and methodology, critical thinking, multi-disciplinary strategies and
applications.
4 Course Delineation

Adaptations for different levels need to be made for every piece of literature and the activities
that are designed to teach the essential questions. Here are some guidelines to follow when
adapting programs:




Literature and Arts III
Read all required material, in full, in preparation for discussion and writing assignments.
Humanities students will be expected to work effectively and independently without prompting.
Finally, students will be expected to participate fully in class discussions and activities. Students
need to be clearly defined as maintaining a self-motivated work ethic. Students should maintain
the integrity of the core texts they read by not reading “parallel” versions, “partial text” versions,
or compromise the integrity of the original work in any other way.





Writing Portfolio: Each marking period students should complete a minimum of four essays that
include: two timed essays and two outside-of-the-classroom essays. Additionally, students will
be expected to work on developing and completing a research paper by the end of the year.
5
Literature and Arts Studies III (Honors) Scope and Sequence


Unit I – Understanding Literary Criticism (1 Week)
Various readings from:
Internet
Contemporary Literary Criticism
Twentieth Century Literary Criticism

Unit II – Summer Reading: An Exploration of Style (2 Weeks)
Ethan Frome, Wharton
Their Eyes Were Watching God, Hurston

Unit III – The Decline of the Gilded Age and Emergence of Realism (5 Weeks)
 A Doll House, Ibsen
 The Importance of Being Ernest, Wilde
 Roman Fever, Wharton

Unit IV – Transition to the Modern Age
 Selections from The Humanities, Volume II (10 Weeks)
 Dubliners, Joyce
 Selections from Ulysses, Joyce
 A Room of One’s Own, Woolf
 Mrs. Dalloway, Woolf
 The Metamorphosis, Kafka
 “The Hunger Artist, Kafka
 “The Secret Sharer,” Conrad

Unit V – Modernism
 Poetry Selections from Pound, Cummings, Eliot and others (6 Weeks)
 Snows of Kilimanjaro, Hemingway
 Brave New World, Huxley
 The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald

Unit VI – AP Language and Literature Test Preparation (4 Weeks)
 Key Terms
 Readings in preparation for the Synthesis Essay
 Practice Tests

Unit VII – Existentialism
 Overview of Philosophies (3 Weeks)
 The Stranger, Camus
 No Exit, Sartre


6 Unit VIII – Beat Generation / Counter Culture / Contemporary Literature (4 Weeks)
 One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Kesey
 Poetry Selections by A. Rich, Ginsberg, Plath, Sexton, Dylan
 Death of A Salesman, Miller

Unit IX – Performance Task (1 Week)
 Independent Project
7 Appropriate New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards in Language Arts:

Standard 3.1 (Reading) All students will understand and apply the knowledge of sounds,
letters, and words in written English to become independent and fluent readers, and will
read a variety of materials and texts with fluency and comprehension.

Enduring Understandings:
Students will understand that close reading a variety of materials and texts leads to a
better understanding of other literature, themselves, and the world at large.
Students will understand that reading critically; asking relevant questions about that
reading, recognizing assumptions and implications, and evaluating ideas are all important
steps to understanding literature, themselves, and their world.
Students will understand that the format of literature from various eras will differ, and it
is these differences which enhance comprehension of that literature.
Students will understand that there are relationships between form and content of all
literature.
Students will understand that the devices of language and structure contribute to the
meaning of literature.
Students will understand that there are techniques which lead to reaching reasonable,
well-reasoned conclusions about an author’s purpose and theme.
Students will understand that using the devices which contribute to the similarities of
thought and action will lead to successful comparisons of the components of selected
literature.
Students will understand that an author’s use of words to create tone and mood will
advance the overall theme or purpose of the work.
Students will understand that applying information from several sources, both print and
non-print, will aid in their ability to foster arguments, draw conclusions, or advance
positions both for exposition and research.

Standard 3.2 (Writing) All students will write in clear, concise, organized language that
varies in content and form for different audiences and purposes.

Enduring Understandings:
Students will understand that using clear, concise, and organized language when
composing and drafting text is essential to clear and productive written
communication.
Students will understand that writing an effective expository essay which is coherent and
unified around a central thesis is an important part of effective written communication.
Students will underriting is a method of discovering ideas.
Sstand that the principles advanced by the process of writing can be
applied to any issues suggested by literature or discussion and that they must vary their
techniques of writing according to purpose.
8 Students will understand that organizing and writing a timed essay which identifies,
develops, and evaluates major points is a major component of successful written
expression.
Students will understand that maintaining a consistency in tone through vocabulary and
syntax is necessary for effective communication.
Students will understand that the conventions of standard written English improve
communication.
Students will understand that producing an accurate summary of a piece of writing or an
oral discussion deepens and enriches communication.
Students will understand that proper use of research techniques, and correctly
documenting information from secondary and tertiary print and non-print sources aids in
the efficacy of a piece of written communication.
Students will understand that identifying and mastering essential parts, functions, correct
form, and basic patterns of sentences are necessary for effective writing.
Students will understand that language mechanics, mastery of spelling, vocabulary and
literary conventions can all be improved through recursive writing.
Students will understand that employing the reasoning techniques needed for written
argumentation will strengthen their persuasive writing.
Students will understand that analyzing and revising writing to improve style, focus and
organization, coherence, clarity of thought, sophisticated word choice and sentence
variety, and subtlety of meaning will promote clear and productive written
communication
Students will understand that using precise language, specific details, definitions,
descriptions, examples, anecdotes, analogies, and humor as well as anticipating and
countering concerns and arguments and advancing a position are all techniques which
result in rich, dynamic written communication.

Standard 3.3 (Speaking) All students will speak in clear, concise, organized
language that varies in content and form for different audiences and purposes.
Standard 3.4 (Listening) All students will listen actively to information from a
variety of sources in a variety of situation.

Enduring Understandings:
Students will understand that speaking confidently and fluently is necessary to deliver
their thoughts, ideas, and opinions clearly to a variety of audiences.
Students will understand that active listening is as important as speaking n order to gain
an understanding and an appreciation of language and communication to effectively
convey ideas.
Students will understand that body language, gestures, and voice inflection are keys to
clearly and lucidly communicate ideas.
Students will understand that demonstrating mastery of logical reasoning is key to
explicating text and supporting ideas.
Students will understand that presenting an oral report which is logical, coherent, and
effective, is the key to communicating efficiently.
9 Students will understand that reading passages aloud effectively so others can grasp
meanings through listening is an important skill towards understanding subtext, and
making literature come alive.
Students will understand that summarizing and evaluating tentative conclusions and
taking the initiative in moving discussions to the next stage is vital to understanding
depth of opinion and subject matter.
Students will understand that supporting a position integrating multiple perspectives
allows one to consider others’ points of view and to defend one’s own.
Students will understand that modulating tone and clarifying thoughts through word
choice makes for effective dialogue and communication.
Students will understand that using the conventions of standard English in speaking
allows for one to utilize language to one’s best advantage when communicating.

Standard 3.5 (Viewing and Media Literacy) All students will access, view, evaluate,
and respond to print, non-print, and electronic texts and resources.

Enduring Understandings:
Students will understand that effectively accessing, viewing, evaluating, and responding
to media is integral for awareness of contemporary societal issues.
Students will understand that messages are representations of social reality and vary by
historic time periods, parts of the world, and media dominance.
Students will understand that various media express the values of a culture, but those
values may reflect only a small segment of the population and should be viewed
critically.
Students will understand that their knowledge of influences on news media based on
political, historical, economical, and social contexts will lead them to be more informed
and aware citizens of the world.


Appropriate New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards in Technology:

STANDARD 8.1 (COMPUTER AND INFORMATION LITERACY) ALL STUDENTS
WILL USE COMPUTER APPLICATIONS TO GATHER AND ORGANIZE
INFORMATION AND TO SOLVE PROBLEMS.

A. Basic Computer Skills and Tools
Students will understand that technology is essential to communicate ideas and solutions.
Sstand that the integration of software is necessary to solve problems.
Students will understand that emerging technologies affects the way research is
conducted.
Students will understand that professionally formatted documents are necessary in the
today’s world.
Students will understand how to produce a multimedia project.
Students will understand the importance of formatting documents in order to
communicate effectively.
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