Hepatocellular Carcinoma in The Gambia and the role of Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C

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English
5 pages
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Objectives Hepatocellular Carcinoma is the commonest form of cancer in The Gambia, and although Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C are known risk factors, accurate baseline data on Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C distribution in the region are limited. Similarly data including information on the involvement of the viruses in HCC remains unknown. The current study was undertaken to estimate the risk of HCC in relation to HCV and HBV in The Gambia. Methods Thirteen patients with histological proven history of HCC and 39 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Each subject blood was screened individually for anti-HCV using ORTHO HCV 3.0 ELISA test system (Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics, Inc, U.S.A) and for HBsAg using QUADRATECH CHECK 4-HBs one step generation hepatitis B surface antigen test kit (VEDALAB, France) following the manufacturers instructions. Results HBsAg and anti-HCV was detected in 38.5 %(5/13) and 7.7% (1/39) of the persons with a history of HCC respectively. HBsAg but not anti-HCV was detected in 12.8% (5/39 of the case control subjects. HBsAg and HCV rates among the HCC patients were higher in men than women. Rates were highest in patients 48 years and above (37.5%; 3/8). No patient was found with anti-HCV and anti-HBV. Conclusion These results indicate that the involvement of HBV and HCV in HCC in the country is in a ratio of 5:1 and that these two viruses might be independently involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. The study revealed a statistically significant association (p = 0.04) between HBsAg and HCC patients. The results also indicate that up to 50% of HCC cases in the country may be due to non viral factors and calls for further studies in this regard. These findings call for provision of diagnostic facilities for these viruses in hospitals and for their routine screening in blood banks while intervention programmes should be put in place.

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Publié le 01 janvier 2005
Nombre de lectures 8
Langue English
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International Seminars in Surgical Oncology
BioMedCentral
Open Access Research Hepatocellular Carcinoma in The Gambia and the role of Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C 1 22 Clement Ibi Mboto, Angela DaviesRussell, Mark Fielderand 3 Andrew Paul Jewell*
1 23 Address: RoyalVictoria Hospital, Banjul, The Gambia,School of Life Science, Kingston University, Surrey KT1 2EE, UK andFaculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, Kingston University and St George's University of London, Surrey KT1 2EE, UK Email: Clement Ibi Mboto  cmboto@yahoo.com; Angela DaviesRussell  ajdavies.russell@kingston.ac.uk; Mark Fielder  m.fielder@kingston.ac.uk; Andrew Paul Jewell*  ajewell@hscs.sgul.ac.uk * Corresponding author
Published: 04 October 2005Received: 03 July 2005 Accepted: 04 October 2005 International Seminars in Surgical Oncology2005,2:20 doi:10.1186/1477-7800-2-20 This article is available from: http://www.issoonline.com/content/2/1/20 © 2005 Mboto et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Hepatitis Bhepatitis Chepatocellular carcinomaThe Gambia
Abstract Objectives:Hepatocellular Carcinoma is the commonest form of cancer in The Gambia, and although Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C are known risk factors, accurate baseline data on Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C distribution in the region are limited. Similarly data including information on the involvement of the viruses in HCC remains unknown. The current study was undertaken to estimate the risk of HCC in relation to HCV and HBV in The Gambia. Methods:Thirteen patients with histological proven history of HCC and 39 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Each subject blood was screened individually for anti-HCV using ORTHO HCV 3.0 ELISA test system (Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics, Inc, U.S.A) and for HBsAg using QUADRATECH CHECK 4-HBs one step generation hepatitis B surface antigen test kit (VEDALAB, France) following the manufacturers instructions. Results:HBsAg and anti-HCV was detected in 38.5 %(5/13) and 7.7% (1/39) of the persons with a history of HCC respectively. HBsAg but not anti-HCV was detected in 12.8% (5/39 of the case control subjects. HBsAg and HCV rates among the HCC patients were higher in men than women. Rates were highest in patients 48 years and above (37.5%; 3/8). No patient was found with anti-HCV and anti-HBV. Conclusion:These results indicate that the involvement of HBV and HCV in HCC in the country is in a ratio of 5:1 and that these two viruses might be independently involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. The study revealed a statistically significant association (p = 0.04) between HBsAg and HCC patients. The results also indicate that up to 50% of HCC cases in the country may be due to non viral factors and calls for further studies in this regard. These findings call for provision of diagnostic facilities for these viruses in hospitals and for their routine screening in blood banks while intervention programmes should be put in place.
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